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Thread: .280Rem cartridges

  1. #1
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Default .280Rem cartridges

    Hi all
    I recently picked up a .280Rem in a 50Th anniversery Rem. 700LSS, 24" barrel. I'm just fed up with the 7mm RM as an all arounder, too noisy, too much kick in a light rifle. Just my opinion
    Anyway, as i am new to this cal., anyone have any favourite ammuntion and bullet weights that they could steer me to for sheep and moose?
    Cheers
    Paul

  2. #2

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    150gr 7mm Nosler Partition and the 280 Rem were made for each other.

  3. #3
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    I like the 140 Accubond with H4350; can get 3000 fps out of my 22" barrel and it is very accurate. Excellent all-round cal; good luck J.

  4. #4

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    Never shot a 280, but Nosler just came out with a 150 gr E-tip. you might give it a look.

  5. #5

    Arrow 280s

    I think you will be pleased with your new caliber of choice if it's anything like the ones I've played with it will probably be accurate with anything you want to shoot mine will shoot anything from 130 to 160 grain bullets in an inch at a 100 yards and close enough to the same point of impact I could take any hunting with the same scope setting.If you handload any of the good quality premium bullets in the 140 to 160 range with any of the 4350 or 4831 powders will do you well if I were going to pick on a moose I'd probably lean towards a 150 or 160 grain bullet. If you aren't a handloader federal offers 150 partitions or 160 grain accubonds norma loads a 156 grain oxyx pp and the 170 grain vulkan pp any of these will do what you want to do, my guns really shot the federals the best but normas ammo was a close second.It's really great caliber and is a pleasure to shoot and reload for...Lot's of luck with your new toy.....Ronnie

  6. #6
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info gents. I spent a long time thinking about this caliber, and this rifle in particular, can't wait for sheep season.
    I don't handload, but a friend does, and he just happens to have all the dies etc for .280, so we'll have to shove some whiskey his way and see what happens.

  7. #7

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    I've had very good luck with both the 150 and 160 partitions. The 280 seems to push them at just the right velocity. Excellent weight retention at all ranges, but unlike the bronze premiums, they still expand very nicely at very long range. If I was going to specialize, I'd use the 150 for deer and sheep, and the 160 for goats, elk and moose. Pick only one bullet for all species, and I'd go with the 160. But I wouldn't stay home if all I had was 150's.

  8. #8
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Get a box of 140-grain Barnes TTSX bullets and give them a try.

  9. #9
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Ok, bear with me here, but why limit this cartridge to say 160 gr.?
    I'm not a reloader, and i certainly don't pretend to be a ballistics master, but if the .280 is based on a 30-06 cartridge, and the -06 can push a 200gr. bullet, shouldn't you be able to load a 180gr. (if it was made) in a .280, or a 7mmRM for that matter?
    I have seen some old hand loaded 7mmRM with 175gr. bullets that protruded out quite a long ways from the brass. What limits the grain size of the cartridge? Does it start to intrude into the powder space, or is it just that the ballistics start to get all weird? Does the sectional density just got to pieces when you start adding length to the bullet?
    I just need to know
    Thanks gents
    Paul

  10. #10

    Default Out of balance

    That would be a heavy bullet for the cartridge. Every cartridge has certain bullet weights that are a good balance with the case powder capacity for efficient power. The 175 grain bullet in the 7mm Rem Mag reduces velocity to the point where it won't do any better for energy/penetration than the 160 grain which is probably the best "heavy" bullet for a medium cased 7mm cartridge. 180 grain is actually a fairly heavy bullet for a non-magnum .30 caliber cartridge and in a 7mm cartridge, there would be no gains. Bullet construction is a more important factor, IMHO.

  11. #11

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    The .280 is a good round. I've had one for 18+ years in a Remmie 7600. You load it right and it'll do what you want it to do.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner View Post
    Ok, bear with me here, but why limit this cartridge to say 160 gr.?
    I'm not a reloader, and i certainly don't pretend to be a ballistics master, but if the .280 is based on a 30-06 cartridge, and the -06 can push a 200gr. bullet, shouldn't you be able to load a 180gr. (if it was made) in a .280, or a 7mmRM for that matter?
    I have seen some old hand loaded 7mmRM with 175gr. bullets that protruded out quite a long ways from the brass. What limits the grain size of the cartridge? Does it start to intrude into the powder space, or is it just that the ballistics start to get all weird? Does the sectional density just got to pieces when you start adding length to the bullet?
    I just need to know
    Thanks gents
    Paul
    The only reason I didn't go there is that he's talking about factory loads, which to my knowledge aren't available with the 175's. I've whacked just enough game with the Nosler 175 in the 280, 284, 7-08, 7x57mm, 7mm Remmie and 7x61 S&H to think of it as a closer range bullet. No reason for that but predjudice left over from way back when it was a semi-roundnose rather than a spitzer. The 160's shot so much flatter, that I've settle on it for the all-around bullet for all 5 of the 7mm rounds I currenly load for. Some old habits are hard to break, especially when I'm still working on a batch of 2000 160-grain partitions I bought for next to nothing in a store that was going out of business. I'd probably feel a lot different about the 175 if I had a bunch of cheap ones on hand.

  13. #13
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    What is the best rifling twist rate for the 280 Rem? 1:10 or 1:9.5 or 1:9, read that a faster twist is recommended for heavier bullets like the 175 grain. What twist rate would work best for bullets from 140 to 165 grain? Thanks

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