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Thread: Steel V.S. Hevi-Shot

  1. #1
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    Default Steel V.S. Hevi-Shot

    I was wondering everyone's opinon on if it is worth spending the extra money for the mixed "heavi-shot" instead of the cheap steel shot. I think it would add up to a ton of extra money if I were to shoot just the good stuff.

  2. #2
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    Talking cheep steal shot?

    Where are you finding cheep steal shot?

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    Default cheap steel

    I suppose steel isnt the cheapest shot in the world but its pretty cheap when you compare it to the new shot that is on the market. I saw winchester 3" i think it was 4 shot for 1050 or 11 bucks at sportsmens.

  4. #4
    Member Michael Insko's Avatar
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    Default

    Well it's like you said, an 'opinion', so here's mine.
    I'm poor :-) And can't justify the $20/box of 10 for hevi-shot when I can get loads of steel between $10-$15/box of 25. Especially when I've taken a large number of waterfowl with steel shot just fine in the last 5 years in college.
    That being said, products like hevi-shot, bismuth, tungsten, etc. may extend your lethal shooting range, and reduce needs for follow up shots on cripples. I've heard great results from using hevi-shot, but I could not afford it shooting the amount I've shot duck/goose hunting.
    It also comes down to what loads pattern the best out of your gun. I had good/bad luck patterning different loads and found a game plan that was most economical. Here's how my loads changed with the season the last few years in Iowa:
    Early season when I was shooting smaller ducks like teal and woodies, I'd fire the cheap Winchester Xpert loads in 4 shot. Xpert didn't pattern as well as drylock, but most shots were close encounters and and a more open pattern worked just fine.
    Mid to late season on bigger ducks like mallards/pintails/divers I'd switch to my bettern patterning load of Winchester drylock 2shot.
    For geese (we had giants down there) I used a very well patterning Winchester Supreme in BBB or BB. Those big honks were tough to knock down sometimes, and once in a while I did wish I could afford hevi-shot for those thick breasted birds!

    If you've got the extra money, I've heard lots of people very happy with hevi-shot for it's lethality (usually their hit ducks were dead on impact). I just haven't brought myself to commit to the extra money involved. Maybe I'll try a box sometime and provide comments after using it.

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    I shot Kent tungsten matrix for one year, but only because I had to. I was stationed in California and didn't have my own gun so a friend loaned me an old Winchester that wasn't certified for steel shot. The tungsten matrix worked extremely well and there were few if any cripples for the season. Most birds were stone dead when they hit the water.

    On the same note.....I usually shoot between 2-3 cases of shot a year and there's no way I could afford that if I had to buy the non tox. The steel works fine for waterfowling especially for the younger generations who never knew the benefits of the lead shot era. Steel does limit your effective kill range, but for those that put in the time and effort to scout and locate birds getting them into the decoys should be relatively easy. Over the dekes the steel is more than efficient at killing waterfowl of any kind. You just have to know the limitations of youself, your gun, and your ammo.

  6. #6
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    I shot Kent tungsten matrix for one year, but only because I had to. I was stationed in California and didn't have my own gun so a friend loaned me an old Winchester that wasn't certified for steel shot. The tungsten matrix worked extremely well and there were few if any cripples for the season. Most birds were stone dead when they hit the water.

    On the same note.....I usually shoot between 2-3 cases of shot a year and there's no way I could afford that if I had to buy the non tox. The steel works fine for waterfowling especially for the younger generations who never knew the benefits of the lead shot era. Steel does limit your effective kill range, but for those that put in the time and effort to scout and locate birds getting them into the decoys should be relatively easy. Over the dekes the steel is more than efficient at killing waterfowl of any kind. You just have to know the limitations of youself, your gun, and your ammo.

  7. #7
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    I buy Hevi-Shot and Tungsten-Iron by the case load. But then again I get it at dealer cost.

  8. #8

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    I've dinked around with all the various loads, and for ducks at least settled on 3" #3's for the first half of the season and 3" #2's for later when the birds are more heavily feathered. It's a rare day I take shots past 40 yards though, so I simply don't need the premiums for ducks. On geese I've settled on 3 1/2" #1 Kent Tungsten Matrix, mostly because it kills as well as any of the other premiums and I found a bunch in a sporting goods store going out of business. I got two cases of it for "steel" prices and am still working on it. In my shooting it works so much better than BB, BBB or T steel that it's not even worth shooting the steel for geese.

    Still watching for another deal on premiums for geese, but haven't found it yet. When I do it won't matter to me if it's hevi, tungsten iron or tungsten matrix so long as the price is right. It all seems to work about the same in my hands. If you see any of this on sale at a good price, buy all you can afford and then watch for more to come along while you shoot that. Sure doesn't seem like the regular prices for the stuff are every going to go down again.

  9. #9
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Default Steel shot

    I have found that steel 2 and 3/4 inch #2's work well for all species of duck. And 3 inch BBB's work well for geese. I go through about a case and a half of shells every year. And can't stomach paying the price for 10 shells when you can buy 25 for the same price and they work just as well. You just have to wait until they get a little closer.

  10. #10
    Member blackcat's Avatar
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    Default Going to try the Hevi steel this year

    going to give this a shot ill let you know my thoughts after the 1st.

  11. #11
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    Ok heres my take on it. Two yrs ago I hunted snow geese in Texas. I am from NY and I figured this would most likely be the only time on a hunt like this so I bought nothing but heavi-shot. It helped I was able to use my Cabelas points from my credit card and get it all free, even had them ship it to Texas for me. In one week of heavy hunting with anywhere from 3-6 other hunters all using steel shot I blew them away. You could hear the differance when you hit the birds and it just folded them. I was very impresed with it. All the other guys wanted to get some. But I use nothing but steel shot at home for both the big Canadas and all my ducks from divers, puddlers to sea ducks. Maybe it isn't as good but it's all I can afford. And it works.

    just my 2 cents,

    Tom Lefebvre

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    Being the excellent wingshooter I am, I generally go through a box of steel every two days during the season, and sometimes, I get my limit of 6 birds. I used tungsten matrix, and had my limit in 5 shots the first time I used it. If you want to get a limit, without shooting a bunch, go with the new fangled stuff. If not, steel does just fine.(Just takes a little longer for some to get their limit)

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