Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Headed to the Haul Rd.

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    12

    Default Headed to the Haul Rd.

    Im new on here so please be patient, Im sure there is so much information on here about Bow Hunting the Haul rd. for Caribou that I could spend hours researching the topic.

    I am coming to Hunt from Aug. 23 to early Sept. with 2 friends, one used to live in Vladez and has hunted the Haul before with no luck.

    By reading some of the posts here it feels like there is very little strategy and more luck in locatiing the herd and then getting setup for a shot.

    We will be bowhunting and I guess what I am wondering is this.. is there anyway to make the best out of my time there other than driving up and down the road looking for the herd then trying to get setup ?

    Is it more productive to stay in one spot and glass and glass and glass or is driving up and down the road the way to do it??

    Then, once the herd is spotted.. is there really any stategy to try to get setup for a shot??

    Like I said, I bowhunt out of a treestand here in Michigan, here they come to us

    Any comments, good or bad would be appreciated..

    Thanks guys.

  2. #2

    Default

    First off I assume that you have read our regulations for that area and you are bowhunter certified.
    Assumeing that, I have found that if there are lots of caribou around, picking a good area that they are in (one with some cover) and staying there. Sit, glass and wait. If the heards are thin and hard to find, than driving up and down the road is about the only option. It is not fun when this happens though, because there will also be several other trucks doing the same thing.
    I will also be up there the same dates you have listed. I will be in a red Chevy, and have a two big tents set up. Stop in and say HI if you would like.
    Bryan

  3. #3
    Member RMiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    1,736

    Default

    When I went up in 2006 we drove the road. We were there for 6 days and stalked caribou non-stop for six days. Luckily I got mine on day two.

    We would drive north until we found a group and would put a stalk on them. Then we would turn around and on the way back to camp we would get into another stalk. Then we would go have lunch and after lunch we would do a stalk to and from the south side of the road. We only drove 20 miles each way and we really would do 2-4 stalk per day.

    Many times we would spot a group and then we would place hunters in front of the groups of caribou. It might take 20 minutes to an hour for most stalks to be a success or not (mostly not).

    The groups of caribou have many eyes and usually the one you want to shoot is in the middle of the group or near the end. The caribou that actually spook first are cows or calves.

    We had just drove onto a ridge in the road and did some glassing when we spotted my bull about 400 yards off the road feeding on a bluff above the river. The two bulls were directly behind a camp by the side of the road but the lay of the land allowed a line of sight view only from our vantage point. The camp could not see the caribou.

    I busted my butt over to the bulls and just happened to have enough bluffs and rises on the ground to get within 50 yards before the bulls had the higher ground. The bull never saw me when I released my arrow at 50 yards.

    I followed the bull to the river where it was dead and the other bull was still mulling around his dead bretheren. Had the limit been two at that time I would have had easily shot the other bull at around 20 yards down hill.(would have had to hold for ten yards because of the angle). I had an arrow drawn when I looked down on them. The pack to the road was around 400 yards.


  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    idaho
    Posts
    11

    Default see you up there

    I just found this site and I am trying to do research for bow hunting the haul road....sounds like there might be quite a crowd. Good luck.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    424

    Default

    Great looking bull RMILLER. What month was he taken?

  6. #6

    Default Just my thoughts

    I didn't see it previously mentioned, but you will be there during what may be one of the busiest times to hunt each year, labor day weekend, so be prepared, be willing to hike in a mile or so and you will probably be away from most of the crowds, yes it will take some time, but it may be worth the effort. Call the biologist for that area a few days or even a day in advance of your trip--we did last year and that is where I killed my bull. Realize that just because you saw the bull first--doesn't mean others won't try to get in on the action, last year we spotted a herd with about 30 bulls in it, i got set up close to the road--5yds--while my buddy hustled out into the field, within 15 minutes I had 5 other hunters around me, everything was safe and I pulled off a good shot, but several times this occured and it tends to scare the bulls more than it attracts them--don't get frustrated--just realize that it happens. If you see a group, figure out where they are going, get ahead of them and sit and hope--don't try to catch up to them, not possible, always have your head on a swivel--and don't give up hope, it seems totally flat there, but they show up in the weirdest places. The first year we went we saw 1Ks of bou, but didn't get close enough to any good bulls, last year we never saw any big herds, but we connected. Take a good camera and be prepared for anything.

  7. #7
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Very Nice Bou
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I truley appreciate all the help guys.. that time of the year (Aug 22-early sept. will the herd be more north yet or starting to come further south, just wondering how far we need to go before we start looking.

    As far as gear ...anything other than obvious that anyone can throw in as a possible essential.

    We are flying in to Anchorage so I guess we could pick something up at Sportsman warehouse if its too big to fly in with.

    Got most of the stuff covered, just wondering if there is anything kinda out of the ordinary that someone may want to mention... thanks again guys.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    64

    Default Meat rack

    you might want to bring some 2 x 4's, handsaw, hammer, nails, and a tarp.
    If its hot or raining you can make up a quick meat pole rack to keep your bou
    cool,dry, and get good air circulation. You won't find any trees.
    Oh, maybe some black pepper or a citric solution to keep insects away.
    I've had good luck with lemon juice and tabasco in a spay bottle.
    Good luck to you!

  10. #10
    Member Stogey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    561

    Default Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by JW2184 View Post
    I truley appreciate all the help guys.. that time of the year (Aug 22-early sept. will the herd be more north yet or starting to come further south

    Yes.

    It will depend upon the weather. LOTS.
    Warm? Critters will be on glaciers, ice, rivers, etc. Trying to stay cool and avoid the bugs.
    Cool? They will be moving around.

    That time of the year they could be anywhere between Galbraith lake and Deadhorse...

  11. #11
    Member Stogey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    561

    Lightbulb Comfort

    Quote Originally Posted by JW2184 View Post
    As far as gear ...anything other than obvious that anyone can throw in as a possible essential.

    Be comfortable.
    I assume you are driving from Anchor-town to the haul road.
    I won't go so far as to say that you have unlimited gear potential, but you can put some creature-comforts in there.

    It may be sunny.
    It may be raining.
    It will surely do both during the time that you are there.
    It might snow.
    The wind WILL blow.
    With that, you need a place to eat your meals, drink coffee (hot chocolate, tea, whatever) out of the elements -- basically a tarp with some sticks to break the wind and protect you from the elements.

    Chairs. Inexpensive, lawn chairs - $8 at Wal-Mart.

    Might want some firewood. There isn't ANY up there.
    Someone mentioned 2 x 4s and tarp for meat.
    Again, there is NO wood on the Dalton.

    Camera

    Fishing pole and light tackle - If you get yours first, why sit in camp, when you could be fishing! The Sag has great grayling fishing.

    When you're done, donate the chairs, tarps, etc to the Salvation Army, Red Cross, charity of your choice.

    Good luck! I plan to be there during that time frame as well.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •