Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Taking On Water - Seward

  1. #1
    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    560

    Default Taking On Water - Seward

    Saturday there was a call to the Coast Guard for a boat taking on water. The location was south of Pony cove. Following the radio discussion, it seemed that help came and they got back to Seward alright. Did any one ever hear what the cause was?
    2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Queen of Kings View Post
    Saturday there was a call to the Coast Guard for a boat taking on water. The location was south of Pony cove. Following the radio discussion, it seemed that help came and they got back to Seward alright. Did any one ever hear what the cause was?
    I was going to ask the same question. I was the first one at the scene (Scott Free). His bilge pump was putting out lots of water and it seemed like he was just barely able to keep up with the water that was coming in (where on a rather smallish boat with outboards could it come from?). A little disturbing that he had to call the Coast Guard twice on the radio before he got a response from them. Good that he lit a flare. Otherwise, it would have been impossible to know where he was. Also good to see so many people rush to the scene to lend assistance if needed. Originally I ran along side him on his starboard, then another came along side his port. Before too long, there were about another 5 boats following behind. I was trying to figure out how in the world we'd be able to transfer people from his boat to mine with the water as rough as it was. I radioed him that I'd follow him into Seward. He asked on the radio if anyone one else was going into Seward anyway so that I wouldn't have to go all the way in. There was, so I ended my part there. I haven't heard anything about the incident, so I assume that it all worked out. Goes to show you how having required (and common sense) equipment on board is a must in case you need them....flares, PFDs, bilge pump, vhf radio.

  3. #3

    Default Leak

    The boat made it back to the harbor and on to the trailer. When we were cleaning fish one of the occupants of the boat told my partner they thought something had broken in the washdown system letting water in. Haven't heard anything else.

  4. #4

    Default

    Maybe a thru-hull fitting (seacock). Glad he made it back ok. Lucky guy.

  5. #5
    Member jrogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,539

    Default

    I was in Agnes cove and listening on the radio, and saw the three boats heading back in. I was pretty impressed with the coast goard's response on the radio. They did a good job at getting the information that was necessary out of the guy. He was talking for several minutes before I ever heard his location and that he was near many other boats that could lend assistance without the need for the coastguard to mobilize. I don't mean to criticize him at all. I am sure he was flustered and I think it was his own idea to light a flare to identify himself. I was looking around as well to see if it might not be one of the boats close to me. There were so many boats around (30+) that it might have been the guy right next to me and I wouln't have noticed him. I am glad he made it back.

  6. #6

    Default Responed as well

    I too was in Pony Cove when the calls were put out for assistance. I ended up being the 3rd boat (22’ Searunner, “Faraway” to arrive for assistance. we tailed the distress boat into Agnes area before pulling off. I had five other passengers on my boat and we were all looking for him when the call went out for assistance. Not one of us saw the flare go up and we were all looking in his direction. From his calls we were sure which boat was having problems and we immediately took off to help, in fact I lost two set ups (trolling) because I made a decision to assist before our lines were pulled in. I consider this a minor loss as I am sure most reading this post would. As for the comment about the skipper of the troubled boat making the decision to shoot a flare off, I believe it was another boater who requested he fire it off. Again I did not see the flare but I remember it being requested a few times and the troubled boat’s skipper commented that he was working on it. I have to assume the flares were stored and out of immediate reach. That being said I made a conscious decision to make sure my kit is readily available and that all on board no how to access and use them. I am glad all turned out Ok, and was glad to see all the boaters respond for assistance.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    One has to wonder what would have happened if he did not have a radio and flares!

  8. #8

    Default He would have seen how good his bilge pump

    and bailing etq. were. If those failed him, Hopefully the dingy is in good order.
    Good on all you folks that helped this guy out.
    Rob
    simplyrugged.com

  9. #9

    Default

    I was waiting for a flare to go up, too. What end up happening was he lit a hand-held flare and held it up. Probably best, because if he'd shot up a flare with that many boats in the area then I don't know that I would have been able to figure out which boat the flare in the sky belonged to. As it was, it was still not terribly easy to see him holding the flare. One of my passengers (3 relatives visiting from Arizona) spotted the flare. They certainly got some excitement that day.

    One thing the boater said to the CG that threw me off was that he was in Cheval Narrows, south of Pony Cove. He was actually north of Pony Cove between Pony and Chevel Narrows. I thought it was kind of funny (later on) when the boater told the CG he was near Pony Cove, the CG asked if there were any other boats in the vicinity, and the boater said "yes, this is PONY COVE!". I also think it was a good idea he contacted the CG first (no mayday was sent) instead of asking assistance from nearby boaters. Kind of like if you come across someone needing first aid and there's a crowd of people around you don't just ask for someone to go get help. You ask a specific person to get help. Otherwise, everyone may assume that someone else is going to do it.

    gman - sorry you lost the rigs but it's good to see that if you need help out there, there are people who are willing to help right away.

  10. #10
    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    560

    Default Location

    I was a bit confused to the location as well. At first I thought he was between Pony and Cheval and then when he clearly stated he was South of Pony, I was confused? That would put him more near Aliak Pt. I think. watched for a sky borne flare and never saw one. I didn't look for a boat level flare tough. Any way all turned out good
    2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

  11. #11
    Member Torpedoshooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    41

    Default Damage Control Plugs

    A tapered soft wooden plug in your boats DC kit or better yet tied to each hull fitting can save you and your boat. What is in your DC Kit??

    Be safe,
    Rich

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Douglas Island
    Posts
    248

    Default Damage Control (DC) kit

    Here's a great brochure on damage control/flooding; you can also find it at http://www.amsea.org/ along with other great info! I also carry the wax toilet bowl rings; they're cheap and easy to find in any plumbing supply or hardware store. Works great in shattered fiberglass, I have personal experience...but that's another story! Mike
    Attached Files Attached Files

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Thanks, that is interesting, toilet bowl rings, who would have thought of it, not me, that's for certain. They also suggest nerf balls, that one I can't figure out?

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Douglas Island
    Posts
    248

    Default Nerf footballs

    All you need to do is squeeze the air out of the football and cram in in the hole; it'll expand back to it's original size and the hole will be (theoretically) plugged....in any damage control situation, the idea is to stem the flow of water enough that the boat's pumps can keep up until you can get out of the water. Most people panic pretty quickly and don't really do enough to stop the water coming in and on small boats, sometimes getting the water to stop coming in is tough because of cramped/restricted access plus the smaller the boat, the less water it takes to sink it. Once you've practiced stopping leaks, you'll gain quite a bit of confidence in your ability to keep the boat afloat. Mike

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •