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Thread: Dall Sheep: Meat

  1. #1

    Default Dall Sheep: Meat

    What do you do with your sheep meat? Lots of recipes on how to cook mutton, but any favorites that are specific to Dall Sheep?

    Thanks!

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    Default sheep

    Just get it to me and I will eat it for you! In other words many think that there is no better meat. It will be tender and won't be strong, if you care for it properly. It is not at all like mutton. Cook it as you would, elk, moose, venison, etc.

  3. #3

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    There is no comparison whatsoever to domestic sheep. Dall sheep is in a class all its' own. It is fantastic, as well it should be for the effort it takes to harvest such terrific fare !

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    Build a fire, grab a hunk out of the game bag, put it on a stick, roast it like a marshmallow and watch it sizzle like bacon. Then, enjoy the richness as the fat dribbles down your chin... repeat... Oh, add a little salt if you want.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default Sheep Fajitas...

    Slice up some sheep into thin strips. Mix it in a bowl with a little soy sauce and some whatsthishere sauce, a few chopped onions, some garlic powder and/or garlic and a little crushed red peppers (the spicy ones). Let sit for an hour so longer. Throw it in a pan with a little hot oil and get it sizzlin an poppin, stir in some red, orange and yellow peppers and stir fry until tender but not mushy. Then, get a large tortilla, lay on a layer of colby jack cheese, nuke it for 30 seconds, fill it up with sheep/pepper mix, give it a shot of spicy brown mustard roll it up and enjoy!

    Sheep make dishes like this very rich. Fabulous.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default sheep meat

    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Slice up some sheep into thin strips. Mix it in a bowl with a little soy sauce and some whatsthishere sauce, a few chopped onions, some garlic powder and/or garlic and a little crushed red peppers (the spicy ones). Let sit for an hour so longer. Throw it in a pan with a little hot oil and get it sizzlin an poppin, stir in some red, orange and yellow peppers and stir fry until tender but not mushy. Then, get a large tortilla, lay on a layer of colby jack cheese, nuke it for 30 seconds, fill it up with sheep/pepper mix, give it a shot of spicy brown mustard roll it up and enjoy!

    Sheep make dishes like this very rich. Fabulous.
    This may work, but I like sheep meat so much that I prefer to be able to taste it. This recipe would work with cottonwood bark......

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    Default chef

    I think he also apreciates it's flavor too, hence the fire roasting technique.

    Ya gotta do something with those trimmings after making up steaks and roasts.

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    Default Grill it

    My favorite is a simple marinade of worchester, beer, garlic, cajun seasoning (I use Emeril's) and some salt. Fell free to use your favorite steak marinade. I soak a whole roast (not more than 3 inches thick) for as long as I can, at least an hour, three or four is better. I then throw it on a hot grill and quickly sear both sides. I prefer mine just barely medium-rare. Anything past medium is a waste of great meat. Then, take the meat off the grill and let it sit for about 5 minutes before carving.

    To carve, cut the meat on a sharp diagnal into thin slices. Think London Broil. I will then sometimes serve with a little horseradish, sometimes not.

    I have used this with roasts from all over the animal and it has always turned out well. Slicing the meat on a diagnal makes even traditionally tough cuts as tender as you could want.

  9. #9

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    My absolute favorite way to cook Dall Sheep is to take a whole roast and put in on a bed of rock salt and place it in an oven at 450 degrees for about 1 minute then turn the oven down to 250. Let it cook to 141 degrees (use a meat thermometer left in the meat) and take it out and let stand for about 10 minutes. It will go up in temp to about 146. Slice it in 3/8 inch slabs and serve. I like it with homemade horseradish sauce.

    I also sprinkle the top of the roast with rock salt before it goes in the oven...not too much though.

    Enjoy...gbt

    p.s. The words "Dall Sheep" and m*&%#n should not be mentioned in the same posting...let alone the same sentence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by driveacub View Post
    This may work, but I like sheep meat so much that I prefer to be able to taste it. This recipe would work with cottonwood bark......
    I'm not in the habit of "doctoring up" any game meat I eat in order to cover up the taste. I usually do my sheep steaks and burgers on the barby with just a little salt and pepper, maybe some garlic powder and a little onion. But, we don't buy any red meat so we use game in all of our recipes including spaghetti, stews, etc. Dishes like that made with sheep burger or stew meat is much richer and better than beef, moose or caribou in my opinion. That was my point when I said "Sheep make dishes like this very rich. Fabulous." Much mo betta!

    But, this is my preferred method of consumption.... mmm heart and ribs here

    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default

    this guy asked an HONEST question

    quit goofing with him already

    poor guy ...........


    1911............ truth is Dall sheep is darn near inedible
    PM me and I'll take it off your hands............ maybe find a musher out there that needs some dog food or something

    kind of a hassle for me but............ helping people out is what I do

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default

    Sheep is the best game meat I've ever eaten. As said anyway you would prepare moose, caribou or other game only the taste and texture are much better. My old ram was over 12 yo and he tasted darn good after a hard day even cooked over a wet alder wood fire cooked on a couple old dirty pieces of rebar.


    Steve

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Default

    Dall sheep is nothing like mutton.

    Mutton is nasty and Dall sheep is the greatest game meat of all.

    I like to cook it medium rare with just a bit of pepper. No marinades needed the meat is tender and mild. Save the marinades and cover up recipes for the caribou, bear and goat.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Default PHAT Alpine BT

    I've gotta admit......there is a special place in my heart for August alpine Sitka Blacktail as far as table quality is concerned.

    I've also enjoyed an early Sept. 3yr old Mt. Goat (Billy). That goat was top notch eating!

    I've not tried sheep though so I'm not trying to compare.

    I agree with the above posters....keep the natural flavors intact by cooking med rare. Your not gonna have many chances in this life to enjoy quality mountain game. Eat it like a predator.

  15. #15

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    IMO, there is no finer game meat than dall sheep. Cook it like you would any other meat. My favorite is seasoned and grilled over an open fire.

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