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Thread: May seem an odd question...

  1. #1
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default May seem an odd question...

    Got a call from the Father-in-Law, says he's had three to a half dozen grey wolves hanging around his calf pens in the last couple months. They're finally letting wolf tags go for sale over the counter on the 1st of September here.
    I was thinking .257 Roberts with 100 grainer, .243 with a 100 gr. bullet, or on the light end, the 60 gr. Partition in .223 that my 1-9 twist AR likes. Any dedicated wolf hunters that have preferences for quick, humane kills? Big ones around these parts are around 100 to as much as 120 pounds, making me think that whatever would kill a whitetail in that weight range should work well. Sure don't wanna give the 'other side' any fuel.

  2. #2

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    They're talking about offering some wolf tags here too. I would think anything you shoot out of a 257 would do the trick effectively. A ballistic tip should put them down very quick but would probably damage the hide quite a bit. A partiton or TSX wont damage the hide much and should put them down fairly quick. My wolf load will probably be a 270 Win, 130 gr E-Tip or 110 gr TTSX.

  3. #3

    Default .270 Win?

    Wouldn't that be overkill if you wanted a good pelt?

  4. #4
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darreld Walton View Post
    Got a call from the Father-in-Law, says he's had three to a half dozen grey wolves hanging around his calf pens in the last couple months. They're finally letting wolf tags go for sale over the counter on the 1st of September here.
    I was thinking .257 Roberts with 100 grainer, .243 with a 100 gr. bullet, or on the light end, the 60 gr. Partition in .223 that my 1-9 twist AR likes. Any dedicated wolf hunters that have preferences for quick, humane kills? Big ones around these parts are around 100 to as much as 120 pounds, making me think that whatever would kill a whitetail in that weight range should work well. Sure don't wanna give the 'other side' any fuel.
    A shotgun with double "O" buck, is the first choice of any fur gather. Better small holes that sew easy, than big ones. My first choice in a rifle would be a
    .22 rf.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  5. #5

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    Concur. Shot lots of foxes on Kodiak over a call w/ 00 buck. Nice neat holes. Shot one (!) with a .243 and old style 100 Gr NP/ 37.0 gr IMR 4350 at about 20 yds out at Pasagshak while deer hunting.

    Salvaged the tail out of that one. What a mess.

  6. #6

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    I have never killed a wolf. However over the last 30 Iowa winters I have been in on hunts that have resulted in over a thousand dispatched coyotes (120 in one winter 4 years ago). The 22 rf will not not kill a coyote cleanly unless the muzzle is against its brain pan. Buckshot works well in close quarters! In my humble opinion your 243 our 257 would be just the checker for wolf.

    Humane kill should always take priority over pelt damage! Besides if your in it for the money then you might as well just leave the wolves alone and get a paper route because in the end you'll make more money! My guess is your motives are more on the line of ridding the wolf threat than making $. Again use your 243 or 257 with confidence!

  7. #7

    Talking

    Dareld: Is the wolf tag a done deal? Last I heard it was still in limbo because of some nit-wit judge. I sure hope it goes on as planned. My rifle of choice will be a Winchester XLR in 22-250, 3750 fps with a 55gr Zipedo. Topped with a 12X Burris.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  8. #8
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Sounds like...

    F&G hasn't said anymore since their last announcement that they'll be available Sep. 1.
    It's not a nitwit judge, well, maybe it is, but more the 'other' side that is trying to get an injunction before the hunt. It really doesn't appear that they're going to get it before the bench before the shooting starts.
    Not in it for bucks....I didn't draw any other special hunts this year, nor did the wife or kids, looks like the 'season' on wolves in the area I intend to hunt in runs from 10 Sep through 31 Dec. They have it in mind to shut it down after their target number is killed, including road kills, and all. It's my intention to try for a nice trophy, don't think they'll eat as well as the 'other' white meat.....

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    Default Never shot one either....but

    many of my buddies and aquaintances here in Dillingham do and have. Lots of 223/243 loads and some of the industrial guys on snowgos use the 22 mag exclusively. I wouldn't split hairs....especially if you are looking to clean up a threat versus make a rug.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    Wouldn't that be overkill if you wanted a good pelt?
    It would be more than needed, but it would give me a little more range and with an E-Tip or TTSX, it wouldn't leave a big exit hole. And, I will be getting a 270 before I get a 243

  11. #11
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    One of the favorite rounds of Frank Glaser aka Alaska's Wolf Man was the 220 Swift.....but over his career he used a number of different rounds.

  12. #12
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Up close I prefer a .22WMR to the heart or ear/temple if you can, almost no hole which is excellent for keeping the pelt. .223 works, .22/250, next choice I'd want to try is a Ruger .204 as the smaller the hole the better.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    A friend of mine in Fairbanks also liked the 22 WMR to the head. He said they are DRT at the shot. He said the wolves have a tendency to look back as they are running away and that is when he shoots.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  14. #14

    Talking longer range

    I think that most wolves that may be shot in Idaho, will be at longer ranges, similar to what you would expect coyote hunting. I think electronic calls and trapping for sure will be taboo. These wolves are already, for the most part, human shy. They'll probably be mostly taken in open areas and fields, till they wise up like coyotes. The most success will probably come from the skilled callers and baiting. I'll opt for longer range rifles.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darreld Walton View Post
    Got a call from the Father-in-Law, says he's had three to a half dozen grey wolves hanging around his calf pens in the last couple months. They're finally letting wolf tags go for sale over the counter on the 1st of September here.
    I was thinking .257 Roberts with 100 grainer, .243 with a 100 gr. bullet, or on the light end, the 60 gr. Partition in .223 that my 1-9 twist AR likes. Any dedicated wolf hunters that have preferences for quick, humane kills? Big ones around these parts are around 100 to as much as 120 pounds, making me think that whatever would kill a whitetail in that weight range should work well. Sure don't wanna give the 'other side' any fuel.
    I don't have first-hand experience, but I'll claim second-hand.

    Years ago a friend (actually a shirtail relative) wanted to use his 243, but was upset by the pelt damage. I rounded up some Barnes 90 grain solids and we set to testing those. As long as you keep impact velocity below about 2400 fps, the don't do a lot of pelt damage, but they shoot plenty flat and kill wolves like lightning. He's since used the load quite a bit for foxes and reports similar results with them. He's making noises about needing more, so it's time for me to check and see if Barnes still makes the solid. I dunno.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    As long as you keep impact velocity below about 2400 fps, the don't do a lot of pelt damage, but they shoot plenty flat and kill wolves like lightning.
    That's interesting... A TSX should stay together up to and over 3000 fps. Were these the original Barnes bullets?

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    That's interesting... A TSX should stay together up to and over 3000 fps. Were these the original Barnes bullets?
    They are (or were) made along the original Barnes classic line with copper jackets and lead cores. The butt was closed over as usual, but so was the nose. In the process the nose was fairly blunt rather than pointed. We compared results using 224 solids (military ball), and these always killed better, but were capable of larger exit holes if velocities at impact top around 2400 fps, along the lines of hard cast revolver bullets with large meplats. It's not a question of holding together, rather how much flesh and bone it starts pushing ahead of it I suspect. But hold the velocitied down a bit and it seems to take the animals right off their feet. Way out of proportion to their small size and modest velocity.

    I have the same concerns about a TSX doing a pencil drill as I do with military ball. In and out. I've shot too many deer with rifle bullets out of Contenders that failed to expand. Not much internal damage and quite a lot longer time before death. Kind of like shooting deer with a target arrow. Even a 357 hard cast at very modest velocities from a revolver kills way faster than a high velocity pointy bullet that stays pointy. If it was me chasing wolves, I'd be looking for a hard cast lead bullet with lots of meplat rather than any jacketed bullet. That would be a stone killer while not messing up hides.

  18. #18

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    I got to try on a full lenght wolf coat that a friend in Ontario had made for hides he took through the years. It still cost an arm and a leg to have the furier? make it for him. Very heavy and good looking all back pellets if said that right.

    Oh he used buck shot or SMG as they call it.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    They are (or were) made along the original Barnes classic line with copper jackets and lead cores. The butt was closed over as usual, but so was the nose. In the process the nose was fairly blunt rather than pointed. We compared results using 224 solids (military ball), and these always killed better, but were capable of larger exit holes if velocities at impact top around 2400 fps, along the lines of hard cast revolver bullets with large meplats. It's not a question of holding together, rather how much flesh and bone it starts pushing ahead of it I suspect. But hold the velocitied down a bit and it seems to take the animals right off their feet. Way out of proportion to their small size and modest velocity.

    I have the same concerns about a TSX doing a pencil drill as I do with military ball. In and out. I've shot too many deer with rifle bullets out of Contenders that failed to expand. Not much internal damage and quite a lot longer time before death. Kind of like shooting deer with a target arrow. Even a 357 hard cast at very modest velocities from a revolver kills way faster than a high velocity pointy bullet that stays pointy. If it was me chasing wolves, I'd be looking for a hard cast lead bullet with lots of meplat rather than any jacketed bullet. That would be a stone killer while not messing up hides.
    I can understand about the flesh and bone being pushed ahead and out. In my case, I'm not looking to sell the hide. Just get them tanned and maybe some day give them to my kids or grandkids. From what I've read about the TSX's, they are reliable openers over 1800-2000 fps depending on the bullet and start loosing petals over about 3000 fps or so. The slower velocites with cast bullets makes sense too, but not sure if I want to work up a load for just wolves since I probably wont get more than one tag a year and I want the flexibility of a long shot as I think that will be most common opportunity. I figure my antelope load will be my wolf load and right now I'm leaning toward E-Tips which might mak a slightly larger hole than the TSX's.

    And I don't too many wolves around here are gonna get shot with a 22 or buckshot. They are a little too smart for that.

  20. #20
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Dont forget that wolves are large critters and even large holes can be sewn together.

    I wonder if the Idaho wolf hides will be very nice anyway due to the warmer weather.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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