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Thread: BFR revolvers

  1. #1

    Default BFR revolvers

    I like single action revolvers for hunting and back-up. I was considering getting a 6 1/2" .475 Linebaugh and just shoot .480 Ruger in it. Has anyone had any actual personal experience with the BFR? It appears that they are several steps above the Super Blackhawk in fit and finish, the barrels are supposedly nicely done, hand-lapped and cut rifled. Anyone care to comment? Thanks....

  2. #2
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    Default

    Mine is the 7-1/2" and it is without a doubt my favorite revolver. I bought .480 brass before I could get .475 brass and they were not as accurate no matter how I loaded them. Just stick with .475 brass and even if you download it is better.
    I have a pile of molds that I made and the gun is the most consistantly accurate with any boolit I choose to load.
    The Lee 400 gr boolit shoots great with 26.5 gr's of 296 for full power and still groups like crazy with 15 gr's of HS-6. I use the Fed 155 primer.
    Since it is a primary deer hunting gun, I like the longer barrels. I wanted the 10" but it was a special order.
    If you don't handload, you should start so you can reach the full potential of accuracy the gun has. Save a LOT of money too. Recoil is not real bad and you will get used to it. My friends Freedom is WAY worse as is Whitworths converted SRH although the Freedom is the worst. A few shots with the pretty wood grips and my friend sent for the rubber ones! I would say the BFR with full house loads recoils like a Freedom with lighter .480 loads. You can also chamber any .475 boolit made in the BFR while the Lee boolit is the max boolit nose length that will go in the Freedom. Even then you need to seat to the very top of the crimp groove and if a boolit pulls a little, it will lock up the Freedom.
    Buy the BFR and don't look back, you will love it. I will never part with mine!
    Read some of the other posts here and you can see how my BFR's shoot.

  3. #3

    Default BFR

    I can't remember the last time I bought factory ammo. Been loading a while. Wish I was still casting. Thanks for the good advice. I wondered about the shorter cases, if they'd affect accuracy a lot in this gun. I'll get the longer cases and download, but will probably work up some too. Thanks.

  4. #4
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    I switched to Hornady dies for all of my revolvers long ago. They doubled my accuracy right off. They are made with the proper expanders for the best neck tension.
    I usually just use a spacer under the sizer and neck size to just below a seated boolit. When the brass gets hard to chamber I remover the spacer and full length.
    Some guys don't like them but I swear by them.

  5. #5

    Default Hornady dies

    I've used them too and like them. Does the crimping in the seater die crimp well enough for the Linebaugh?
    I looked at a couple BFRs today, one a long cylinder .500 S&W, slightly used, and a new 7 1/2" 454. They are fine looking guns, nicely finished. The new one was plenty tightly fitted. Kind of like a mega Super blackhawk. Did you ever try scoping yours?

  6. #6
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    Default Hornady dies...

    mauserboy-

    I bought the Hornady Custom Grade dies for my 475 LB off of midwayusa for about $60. They are a 4 die set and are working good for me. Definately worth your consideration IMO.

    If you don't have alot of experience with the 475 LB, talk to Murphy. He set me on a pretty good track with load data.

    Allen

  7. #7
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    I believe the .475 Hornady dies only come with the 4 die set. You can crimp with either the seating die or the separate crimp die.
    I use the Ultra Dot on my guns for hunting. www.ultradotwest.com About $135 and they pay shipping. One of the few that can take the recoil. I shredded a lot of scopes and cheap red dots.
    I can't see the crosshairs or deer through a scope in the mornings or evenings, they are too dark. Strange, but a cheap Tasco pistol scope can take the recoil and the tubes are real hard. Still too dark though because of the long eye relief.
    Pistol scopes are not bright because the exit pupil disperses and you lose the light.
    I bought a new Swift 2X scope after reading how tough they were.
    I never got the gun sighted before it was full of broken glass. They sent me a new one so I put it on a .22.
    By the way, don't mount a red dot with the rings over any glass. Use the front extension to mount to. Ask me how I know that!
    Someone gave me a laser so I mounted it on top of a scope for fun. Shredded that too.
    I ruined the tube on a Burris with my .44. They are dead soft and slip in the rings making the tube real skinny. The .475 would make it into a pretzel.
    The secret for heavy recoil is to use the lightest thing you can get for a scope. Stay away from the variables. You also need hard tubes.
    Last edited by bfrshooter; 07-10-2008 at 20:10. Reason: addition

  8. #8

    Default Ultradot is good

    Matter of fact, I had a 1" tube Ultradot on my first SRH .454. Held up surprisingly well.

  9. #9
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    mauserboy -- I have shot bfrshooter's .475 quite extensively and all I can say is that if I were on the market for another .475, I would look no further! Fit and finsih is very nice, but isn't FA nice, but who cares, particularly if you plan on using it in the field. It's a great revolver -- very accurate and it handles recoil very well -- much more pleasant to shoot than my .475 SRH!! Oh, and they are priced right to boot.........

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