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Thread: Old Winchesters?

  1. #1

    Question Old Winchesters?

    Ever wonder what ever happened (if anything) to all the old Winchesters that were used in the old westerns that a lot of us grew up with? At one time, when I was younger, you couldn't hardly sell one cause it seems as though, everyone had "some". Now, a cheap old original Winchester starts around $3500 and goes up to $75,000 or beyond. Hard to imagine what they'd all be worth at today's market, wherever they may be resting.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  2. #2

    Default Old Winchesters

    I can certainly appreciate your romantic ideas about the old Winchesters, but truth to tell, the ones that were actually used in the westerns probably wouldn't be worth spit now. They were usually dropped down rocky outcroppings or flung wide when a rider went down off his horse. The actual movie guns were rebuilt and repaired after every movie.
    The ones that are relatively well kept certainly do bring some bucks, but the ones that goe for $15,000 and up are pretty unique. What I appreciate is the way the old Marlins are finally gaining value as collectibles. Always though they were better then the Winchesters.

  3. #3
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maydog View Post
    Ever wonder what ever happened (if anything) to all the old Winchesters that were used in the old westerns that a lot of us grew up with? At one time, when I was younger, you couldn't hardly sell one cause it seems as though, everyone had "some". Now, a cheap old original Winchester starts around $3500 and goes up to $75,000 or beyond. Hard to imagine what they'd all be worth at today's market, wherever they may be resting.
    The company that sold off through auction in the late 70's was Jay Curtis Earl. Upon his death the company was dissolved at the auction. His company had supplied the studio guns for decades. They owned and rented a lot of tanks, track rigs, machine guns and just about every thing you saw on the screen.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4

    Talking kinda sad aint it?

    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    I can certainly appreciate your romantic ideas about the old Winchesters, but truth to tell, the ones that were actually used in the westerns probably wouldn't be worth spit now. They were usually dropped down rocky outcroppings or flung wide when a rider went down off his horse. The actual movie guns were rebuilt and repaired after every movie.
    The ones that are relatively well kept certainly do bring some bucks, but the ones that goe for $15,000 and up are pretty unique. What I appreciate is the way the old Marlins are finally gaining value as collectibles. Always though they were better then the Winchesters.
    I think you're on here mauserboy. Since I've become more interested in lever guns in the last few years, I'm just more aware of these rifles watching some of the westerns. I almost cringe when I see them thrown down into the dirt and rocks and the other ways they're abused...nobody hardly ever put one down gentle. Can't argue about the Marlin's either...just recently bought three. and I love 'em.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  5. #5
    New member George's Avatar
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    Smile old levers, etc.

    Ya I cringe also as I watch some of the old movies. More recently, many of the "westerns" use spaghetti repros so no great harm. However, in the Quigley movie the Sharps were modern but very expensive Shiloh Sharps and they did get tossed here and there... criiiinge. If you've watched either Crossfire Trail or Monte Walsh, Selleck uses some of his own real deal guns. I've noticed those don't get tossed around

  6. #6
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Yeap some of us like those things...
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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  7. #7

    Thumbs up Teaser

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Yeap some of us like those things...
    You know how to make one jealous Float. And I like your rifle...looks in great shape. Any interesting background and what have you hunted and bagged with that boy? Thanks.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  8. #8

    Default

    I like to see honest wear and dings on older guns, especially if you can track down the stories behind the marks. You won't usually get the stories from "real" collectors, but from the original owners or their descendants.

    Along that line of thinking, I don't have much respect for big-time collectors who drive up the prices for old guns so us commoners can't afford them, then stick them away in vaults never to be shot again. Seems like hoarding to me. Fun to see their guns, but not the Midas look in their eyes. I prefer the look in the eyes of a guy showing me his granddad's gun that his dad used then passed on to him. The look gets even better if you can be on hand when he shoots it or takes game with it. No $'s on those looks, but to me that's the true heritage of guns rather than hoarding them in vaults and trading them like used Studebakers.

    You won't find any museum pieces in my gun safes. They all get shot and used, and most have taken game of one sort or another. Give me a nice bore and good function rather than pristine condition, but especially give me the stories behind the dings.

    I've got my dad's SAA and original duty leather from the days when he was a deputy in a tough corner of New Mexico more than half a century ago. There's a dent in the trigger guard that's part of family legend. There's also a couple of slugs I've recovered from game using the old hogleg myself. Those, the gun and the leather will move on through the family tree along with the stories.

    That's gun heritage.

  9. #9
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Any interesting background and what have you hunted and bagged with that boy?
    That is a Model 1892 from the first year of production (mid 1892) in caliber 38 WCF also known as 38-40.

    It will still shoot a 2.5 inch group at 100 yards using the old Marbles tang peep. Using cast lead.

    It spent many years with the older folks in our family using hot factory loads that used to say (Rifle Only) on the box.

    It has been across Arizona and California during the 1900 to 1905 period and before that saw some adventures around Leadville Colorado.

    The Bisley Colt in the same caliber, that used to accompany it has gone off to another family member.

    I took that old 1892 with me north of the arctic circle, while winter trapping around Fort Yukon between 1982 and 1984. (It workled at 50 below zero with no problems)
    Into the rain forrest of South East Alaska between 84 to 86 and then all over south central and the interior.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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  10. #10

    Talking

    Hi Brown: You echo some of my sentiments. Like I stated, at one time they were everywhere, considered by many as "loaners". Where'd they all go? I don't think collectors have them all, but if one can find any, then the price is outrageous. You folks that have inherited some family treasures (guns) are pretty lucky...use them well.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  11. #11

    Default Two stories and one great tragedy

    I am leaving to visit grandparents tomorrow. I thought that I would throw out one of the great mysteries or legendary stories that people talk about.
    1) The lost trove of Winchesters-
    One of the great stories that is passed around the campfire is that during WWII the ATC of South Central were supplied with a steel container that was filled with 1895 30-40 Krag leveractions and were packed in cosmoline and then burried near the Tsaina River over a whole summer by Walter Charley. It has been said that he passed on without telling anyone the location of this lost trove of rifles supposedly there were more than 100 rifles packed in cosmoline. Some people search for this metal container still.

    2) Dean Wilson Senior was a Fur Trapper and Fur buyer who travelled throughout the bush. He was often recognized at many different potlatches and helped people who were suffering from a patch of hard luck. Many people believe that he had a whole wall of classic winchester leverguns that he put in a secret wall of his house on his homestead. In the Early 1990s, his home burned down and he lost all of these classic guns. He probably had all different shapes and sizes of them with most potlatch guns having to be in new unfired condition I can't even imagine their value in todays collectors market.

    Sincerely,

    Wish me luck I haven't left the state in 10 years and after my grandparents pass, I may go visit Canada but I won't leave AK easily.

    Thomas

  12. #12
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    My great uncle was captain of the guards at the Baltimore City Jail(Maryland). I was young so can't remember any dates. As he was getting ready to retire they were switching over to different weapons from Model 1892 Winchesters and some unknown to me model revolvers,both chambered for the same cartridge of course,the 38WCF. He could have had as many of them as he wanted for the taking. As it was he only took his issued weapons. All these weapons were fired for familiarization only once a year so were in pristine condition. I remember seeing and handling his rifle but never did see the revolver. Anyways,a long time passes up until maybe 5 or 6 yrs ago and I'm given the rifle. The family had it REBLUED and SLING STUDS put in. Not a barrel band either,right through the forend cap. They may as well wented ahead had it drilled and tapped for a scope then put a recoil pad on it. You'd of thought the gunsmith would have known better. Oh,date of production on this rifle is mid 1894. His revolver? Ain't nobody knows. Anyone know what make and model his revolver could have been? Oh well,such is life.

    til later

  13. #13

    Angry con job of the year

    There's a local bozo that started a museum years ago and had an extremely extensive collection of old lever Winchesters on display. Most of them were owned by locals, and this guy talked them into letting him display the guns in his museum. Well, the museum went belly up (due to other legal problems) and last I'd heard, the folks were having a heck of a time getting their rifles back. Seems as though a lot of them mysteriously "disappeared". Would that frost you or what?
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  14. #14
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    I'm in complete agreement that Marlin lever guns are better than Winchester's. Although I must admit I'm a confirmed M70 nut .

    Brent

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