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Thread: Ruger 500

  1. #1
    Member fozz's Avatar
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    Default Ruger 500

    Do you think there is enough sales of the Smith and Wesson 500 for Ruger to put one of there own out?

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    Default Ruger .500

    It didn't take Ruger long to come out with a .44 Mag back in 1956 but I guess they aren't in a hurry for the .500 Mag.

    I think the gun would be pretty heavy if they had to stretch the SRH frame - a SRH is not much lighter than a X frame .500 now.

    A .500 Super Blackhaawk could be interesting.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    I don't know what kind of a deal Ruger and Magnum Research has but the gun is already there in the BFR's. It is a basic larger Ruger with closer tolerances and proper twist rates for each caliber.

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    What are you talking about, Jim? The BFR is .500 S&W or the BFR in .500 JRH?

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    Depends on the cylinder length he wants. Not a whits difference between most .500s for killing power, the JRH will do it all.
    Personally I will keep my .475 BFR, the gun is the right size, twist is right, it will kill anything on earth, brass is cheaper, recoil is not bad and the price of the gun is right.
    You can explain to the guys how it shoots!
    Of course I COULD post a few pictures! OK I will, how about average 50 yd groups with a variety of cast boolits. The large target was 200 yd's and the can was shot twice at 100 yd's.
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    How about 50 yd groups with my 45-70 BFR with different boolits/bullets?
    The right target was a sight in for deer. the Center 5 shot group is 7/16".
    Drop at 150 yd's is only 4" and at 200 is 16".
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    OH, MY, what have we started? How many guys will post what their guns can do?
    Marko, time for you to post a few too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fozz View Post
    Do you think there is enough sales of the Smith and Wesson 500 for Ruger to put one of there own out?

    Call Ruger and ask em Doubt anyone here can answer your question.
    Tennessee

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    A stretched frame isn't necessary as that gbig case isn't necessary. I'll take the .500 Linebaugh or .500 JRH which will fit in a standard length SRH cylinder -- and trust me, you wouldn't want it any lighter.

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    Default .500 S&w

    The orginal thread was for a factory .500 S&W caliber - not a conversion or shorter round. The conversions are nice but hardly cheap - the price of a new gun is getting close to $1000 to start. A shorter factory round would lose a lot of market hype and sales; the stopping power equalvalent doesn't really matter to most buyers. Marketing and sales is probably why S&W didn't come up with a N frame plus for the .454 - the market is already saturated and crowded. They wanted something new and exciting that would sell - hence the X frame.

    I don't find the recoil of my .500 S&W painfull. Stout, but not painfull, I can live with recoil as long as it doesn't hurt. I would go with a lighter gun for carrying and hunting - much the same idea as my 329 PD. I don't shoot it much with heavy loads but I do practice with lighter loads to become more familair with the gun.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whitworth View Post
    A stretched frame isn't necessary as that gbig case isn't necessary. I'll take the .500 Linebaugh or .500 JRH which will fit in a standard length SRH cylinder -- and trust me, you wouldn't want it any lighter.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    I guess you aren't seeing the hype that you bought into! Long before the .500 Smith, the .475 and .500 Linebaughs were the choices of the serious handgun hunters, who learned that driving bullets fast doesn't aid in killing ability. Smith & Wesson made a brilliant marketing ploy to recapture the title of "world's most powerful production revolver" which drove a bunch of would be handgunners to buy them and then all of a sudden the market gets flooded with barely shot .500s. It is the Johnny come lately of the handgun world. There is most certainly a place in the market for a packable revolver in a big caliber.

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    Default hype = market sales = profits

    I'm not certain what you meant by the first sentence. I basically stated that the X frame and the .500 S&W were marketing hype and a brilliant marketing move- not that the cartridge was any better in killing power than any of the custom Linebaughts etc or even the .480.

    What S&W did accomplish was to make an affordable shootable high powered revolver. I don't think any but the most serious hunters can handle the recoil or the cost of the Ruger conversions or probably even the .480. I'm not particulally fond of muzzle breaks but they do help on the recoil a bunch.

    S&W also made the cartridges and components more avalaible, affordable, and in large variety of bullet weights etc. The .480 I'm sure is equal in killing power for all partical purposes but look around for shells or components.

    S&W also makes the X frame in a variety of muzzle lengths - I like the 4" myself although a 5" would be better. The choices of barrel lengths in the SRH line is more limited.

    Serious users of revolvers are in the small minority of buyers - look at all the barely shot and hardly carried magnum handguns for sale. Sales and profits drive the real world - we don't really matter much.


    Quote Originally Posted by Whitworth View Post
    I guess you aren't seeing the hype that you bought into! Long before the .500 Smith, the .475 and .500 Linebaughs were the choices of the serious handgun hunters, who learned that driving bullets fast doesn't aid in killing ability. Smith & Wesson made a brilliant marketing ploy to recapture the title of "world's most powerful production revolver" which drove a bunch of would be handgunners to buy them and then all of a sudden the market gets flooded with barely shot .500s. It is the Johnny come lately of the handgun world. There is most certainly a place in the market for a packable revolver in a big caliber.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Available shells and components? There is a sizeable aftermarket for the .480 Ruger and some great factory ammo for them particularly from Buffalo Bore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whitworth View Post
    A stretched frame isn't necessary as that gbig case isn't necessary. I'll take the .500 Linebaugh or .500 JRH which will fit in a standard length SRH cylinder -- and trust me, you wouldn't want it any lighter.

    So what did it cost to have the new cylinder built and the barrel re bored for your Super Red Hawk? What barrel length did you end up with? I'm in total agreement about the velocity. Around 1,000 fps is all you will ever need.

    How about the .475 BFR? what does that cylinder cost? I know where to get a re-bore/rifling done. I just think it gets a little nuts laying out a grand plus for a cylinder. Would a regular Redhawk take it?

    What case is the .475 BFR based on? What is the true bore diameter?
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  15. #15

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    Thw 475 that is chambered in the BFR is the 475 Linebaugh. Redhawks can be and have been convert to 475 and 500. This conversion requires a 5 shot cylinder and that gets expensive, the BFR can be purchase as a 475 for much less than a conversion.

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    Al, the .475 in question is a .475 Linebaugh. You can get the BFR in this caliber for about $900.00 new. My SRH started life as a .480, so we maintained the factory barrel and 7.5-inch length as it was to be a primary hunting tool and not a backup gun. The cylinder was $1000.00 (prices have since gone up), and the thing will shoot under 1-inch at 50 yards.

    Redhawks have been used for this conversion for a long time and are well up to the task. The .475 was originally based on a cut-down .45/70 (1.40-inches) and the true bore diameter is .476 -- the .480 Ruger is just a shortened version -- kind of a .475 Special.........


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    Quote Originally Posted by Whitworth View Post
    Al, the .475 in question is a .475 Linebaugh. You can get the BFR in this caliber for about $900.00 new. My SRH started life as a .480, so we maintained the factory barrel and 7.5-inch length as it was to be a primary hunting tool and not a backup gun. The cylinder was $1000.00 (prices have since gone up), and the thing will shoot under 1-inch at 50 yards.

    Redhawks have been used for this conversion for a long time and are well up to the task. The .475 was originally based on a cut-down .45/70 (1.40-inches) and the true bore diameter is .476 -- the .480 Ruger is just a shortened version -- kind of a .475 Special.........


    Thanks for the info! I started off on this project a couple of years ago. It had been so long I had forgotten why I had been keeping my eye out for a good indexer for my mill. I had the 1,000 buck quote before for the cylinder was why I figured I would never pay to have it done. I know I can send the barrel off to Washington for the re bore.

    Heck, I would be happy just to get a .45 Colt in a RedHawk. It really is just the step up to get me away from my old S&W. Like me, it needs to be retired.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    My factory 480 will shoot 1" groups at 50 yds with handloads, and will drive a 460 gr cast @ 1150 fps, no need to have a custom 475L cylinder cut and the gun timed to become a 5 shooter.

    To the original thread, I just don't see ruger coming out with a new gun to handle the length of the 500 S&W, nor do I see them coming out with a shortened 50. I'm sure the 480 was a lesson in that if you don't offer the biggest/mostest, you stop at 454 casull, and most folks stop at the 44 mag.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    My factory 480 will shoot 1" groups at 50 yds with handloads, and will drive a 460 gr cast @ 1150 fps, no need to have a custom 475L cylinder cut and the gun timed to become a 5 shooter.

    To the original thread, I just don't see ruger coming out with a new gun to handle the length of the 500 S&W, nor do I see them coming out with a shortened 50. I'm sure the 480 was a lesson in that if you don't offer the biggest/mostest, you stop at 454 casull, and most folks stop at the 44 mag.
    Paul, no doubt it's not "needed", but it is something that I have wanted for a long time and I had it built and it shoots exceedingly well. It will shoot way more accurately than I am a capable of shooting it, and I have found "the" load for it that groups well at all ranges and is easy to shoot even at 200 yards. To say that I am very happy with it would be an understatement of epic proportions. It shoots a lot better now than when it was in factory trim.

  20. #20

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    This year Rugers 480 SRH is a five shot. Any thoughts?

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