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Thread: 7MM Rem Mag.

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    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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    Default 7MM Rem Mag.

    I am looking to turn my 7mm into a tack driver. It used to be pretty darn accurate but in the past couple years accuracy has gone to crap. I was told to get it glass bedded. Does that sound right? It has the original wooden stock that i would like to keep if at all possible. Also can you recommend a good gunsmith in the Fairbanks/ north pole area? Thanks to all of you who help me out with suggestions!

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mntransplant View Post
    I am looking to turn my 7mm into a tack driver. It used to be pretty darn accurate but in the past couple years accuracy has gone to crap. I was told to get it glass bedded. Does that sound right? It has the original wooden stock that i would like to keep if at all possible. Also can you recommend a good gunsmith in the Fairbanks/ north pole area? Thanks to all of you who help me out with suggestions!
    The first two things to do before you take it anywhere, Make sure the guard screws are tight. Clean the copper out of the bore. Make the barrel as clean as new. One other thing, make sure your base screws are tight. Test your scope to make sure it hasn't gone south on you.

    Then shoot it! Test again.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  3. #3

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    I agree with Al. Accuracy in my favorite 7mag started going south, and it occurred to me that I hadn't done a really thorough bore cleaning in way too long. Some pretty significant copper fouling turned up. Took quite a bit of work to get it all out, but the rifle "came back to life" afterwards.

    You don't mention what make and model of rifle it is. If it's a Ruger M77 there's also the possibility that the angled action bolt is touching the stock. Reaming out the hole in the stock with a rattail file enough to free up that bolt will usually restore accuracy in a misbehaving M77.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Borescope time?

    You're in North Pole? If clean is a question, there's a guy up there, Steve (Stid2677) I bet wouldn't mind running his borescope through your 7mm. He posted an interesting thread:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ight=borescope

    If a nick on the crown can affect rifle precision/accuracy, then it seems like a clump of copper or other residue elsewhere might do the same, I don't know. Good luck.

  5. #5

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    I have to agree with all previous posts. And I also have a 7mm Rem Mag that has lost it's accuracy (Ruger M77). I had it bore scoped, and the smith said the throat was burned out. It also had a lug screw issue. I'm going to get a second opinion on the throat and get some other stuff checked as well as a scope swap out just for kicks and grins and my own education. But once my ammo for it is out, I'm going to get it rebarreled and have a new stock put on it cause there's already closse to a 1000 rounds through the chrome moly barrel.

    If you've got a lot rounds through it you might want to think twice about spending a lot of $$$ getting it accurized and then burning out the barrel soon after, if it's not already shot. If you like your action, build on it, if not, maybe get a new rifle....

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    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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    Default 7mm REM MAG

    Sorry,
    It's a Remington 700 BDL. I cleaned it quite a few times and to my knowledge it seems very clean. I went through it and tightened everything i could find. Hopefully i didn't over tighten anything. I brought it to below zero gunsmithingin North Pole and he went through it and tightened it up said it should be spot on. Well i took it to the range after boresiteing (sp?) the scope. It took about 5 shots just to get it to hit the paper. HMmm....?

  7. #7

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    I assume the smith checked the crown and checked for a buldge in the barrel? And did he bore scope it? (not bore sight) Bore scopeing is looking down down the barrel with an optical lense to check the conditon of the barrel. How many rounds do you have through it?

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mntransplant View Post
    Sorry,
    It's a Remington 700 BDL. I cleaned it quite a few times and to my knowledge it seems very clean. I went through it and tightened everything i could find. Hopefully i didn't over tighten anything. I brought it to below zero gunsmithingin North Pole and he went through it and tightened it up said it should be spot on. Well i took it to the range after boresiteing (sp?) the scope. It took about 5 shots just to get it to hit the paper. HMmm....?
    Something could have gone haywire in the scope. I had this happen at the range 2 days before sheep season a couple years ago. All of a sudden I could not hit the paper. I brought the target back to 25 yds zeroed then back to 100yds and it was off the paper again. I had to take my moose rifle and drag that 8 pounder up the mountain. I sent my scope back to the manufacturer and they replaced the main tube and the rifle shoots great now.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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    The smith said that my gun needed a new crown since the original one was still on and pretty warn down. So i had him put on a muzzle brake since he was cutting a new crown. I couldn't tell ya if he actually bore scoped it or not. He told me that he went through everything so who knows if he borescoped it or not. I'm kinda leaning towards geting it glass bedded and getting a new scope. I know it 's a pretty penny to spend but i really like this gun and think it would be worth it (to me). Anyways my plan is to have it borescoped to check the barrel for any abnormalities and then glass bed it then a new scope if need be. I know i should probably get a new scope then bed it but hunting season is coming up soon and its easier to put a scope on and zero it in on the last minute, rather than have to rush and get it bedded. Thank you all for your info, it has helped me quite a bit. Best of luck to all of you this season.

    mntransplant

  10. #10
    Big Stick
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    Crowns do not "wear". They are either concentric and intact,or they are not.

    Sounds like the "Smith" is a hack,as a minimum..................

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    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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    Oh great.. I've been had by some quack who poses as a gunsmith.... Any suggestions on a good gunsmith?

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    By *worn*, he might have meant damaged. Damaged crowns will affect accuracy.

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mntransplant View Post
    The smith said that my gun needed a new crown since the original one was still on and pretty warn down. So i had him put on a muzzle brake since he was cutting a new crown. I couldn't tell ya if he actually bore scoped it or not. He told me that he went through everything so who knows if he borescoped it or not. I'm kinda leaning towards geting it glass bedded and getting a new scope. I know it 's a pretty penny to spend but i really like this gun and think it would be worth it (to me). Anyways my plan is to have it borescoped to check the barrel for any abnormalities and then glass bed it then a new scope if need be. I know i should probably get a new scope then bed it but hunting season is coming up soon and its easier to put a scope on and zero it in on the last minute, rather than have to rush and get it bedded. Thank you all for your info, it has helped me quite a bit. Best of luck to all of you this season.

    mntransplant
    I've crowned and re-crowned a lot of barrels, never once have I seen a difference. I know this flies in the face of what you have been told. It's not hard to tell if a crown is bad, just use a 10X eye loop and look at the edge of the rifling at the crown. If all look square, you good to go. Most of the time it you see uneven wear it's do to wiping the rod when people pull the cleaning rod to the rear. I have never seen a crown so bad that it scatters shots on the paper, open up a group a little, yes.

    Rifle scopes on the other hand, more problems with them, than any other single problem. This is the biggest single factor, outside copper fouled bores and loose screws that I see for a rapid loss of accuracy.

    Which scopes do not exhibit the tracking problem. Nightforce, Sightron, Tuckerized Leupolds. Among the the single best is the Sightron, I now recommend them as a vary good affordable scope. Yes there are a couple of others, but they are so far out of the league of most hunters as to be totaly unaffordable. They in fact are not hunting scopes at all but rather purely target scopes.

    Bedding can be the source of endless headaches. Wooden stocks can and do cause many bedding headaches. Wooden stocks that don't cause the problems are the laminate wood stocks and the laminate stocks that are impregnated. You guessed it, they are heavy, but vary stable.

    Fiberglass stocks on the other hand have there own set of rules as to good and bad. Here more than any other place "money talks", there are a few surprises among fiberglass stocks. Sometimes cheaper is as good as more expensive, that will be in one or two areas. Over all current stocks that are good for the long haul will cost from 450.00 to 650.00, that is a chunk of change for a worry free hunting rifle stock.

    I'm still with the earlier advice, call the builder and talk to them about the problem.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  14. #14
    Big Stick
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    Keep your eyes peeled for Hucksters who trumpet Sightron too.

    Always consider the source and the sign is easy to read,if one is inclined.................

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Stick View Post
    Keep your eyes peeled for Hucksters who trumpet Sightron too.

    Always consider the source and the sign is easy to read,if one is inclined.................

    Where and when, you gutless wonder?
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    Where and when, you gutless wonder?
    Al, you had my eyes watering I was laughing so hard when I read that!

    Its so easy for some people to talk smack on a computer isn't it?

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schmidty_dog View Post
    Al, you had my eyes watering I was laughing so hard when I read that!

    Its so easy for some people to talk smack on a computer isn't it?
    Sorry to all that read that, I showed my ***** on that one. I just get a little upset when some hides behind a key board. I once ask the best gunsmith I know why he never gets on the inter-net? His reply was really
    priceless.

    "Because I can't reach through the screen and choke the stupid Ba$tards".

    Hard to argue against that kind of logic.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  18. #18

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    Which scopes do not exhibit the tracking problem.

    Come on now...You know what your missing...we talk about them all the time. Mr. Helmut Schmidt and Mr. Helmut Bender would not like to be left out of this conversation...

    However, you did hit it right on the head, 98% of pocketbooks sure wouldn't want to be included.

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    The most sold scope made by Leupold is the 3X9. I bought one from a guy I know, mounted it on a 30-06 Mauser. Sighted it in and got on the plane for a Yukon river moose hunt. I had the rifle at all times no baggage handler but me. I test fired the rifle when I got to my destination. I could not get on a paper plate at 27 yards. The scope had lost it between Fairbanks and Fort Yukon. Luckily I always pack a good set of peep sights with me. Got on paper and went hunting. Scored my moose. Yes I got the fix for free. I don't have a complaint about their warranty work. Just remember it ain't free. You pay up front for warranties.

    Maybe because I'm around more Leupold scopes than any other brand, I see more of this tracking problem than any other brand. Why do scopes fail the tracking test?

    Only a few brands of scopes have not used the flat springs that adjust the azimuth and elevation. These thin flat springs lose tension. The erector tube that they put tension on have to have tension all the time to maintain the zero. Once the tension is gone the erector tube is free to wonder. AND DOES.

    I can hear the calls of sacrilege and the "I've used the same Leupold scope from before they made them, and never had a problem". All I can say is, you are lucky and I wish I were you.

    A scope that has no internal adjustment and uses adjustable mounts, will be about as trouble free as you can get. With the proviso, that it's fixed power.

    Now that statement has left 99.9% of the shooting public behind, the next best thing is to insure you eliminate as many potential problems as possible. You have to start with the scope it's self.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  20. #20

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    Barrel clean?

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