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Thread: Sheep hunt Crampons

  1. #1
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Sheep hunt Crampons

    Ok so my hunt is in September and there is allways the opportunity to get some snow at altitude that time of year so I was considering packing some light weight crampons. A good portion of my hunt area is glacieated as well though I am not planning on trying to traverse any solo as it just seems like a good way to never be seen again. I was looking at some of the instep style and thought it may be a good tradoff between weight and function. I was just curious if anyone else packed them and if they were worth the weight

  2. #2

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    Go talk to Marc at Wiggy's, he's got some in the store along with some pretty nice ice axes that you can also use as trekking poles.

  3. #3
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    After some interesting experiences in SE Alaska while goat hunting I won't leave home without them; that nice grassy hillside can get pretty slippery when wet and the bottom can be a long ways away. I've also found that wearing Helly Hansen rain gear is like having your own personal Slip-n-Slide when you fall on a wet, grassy hill.

    I've carried the instep crampons, but find the Kahtoola KTS to be much better. The instep ones are lacking if you are climbing and using mostly the toe area of your boot. If you plan to walk on a lot of rock then the aluminum ones are going to get beat up fairly quickly, but I don't find I want for a lot of traction on rocks. The aluminum ones are great on ice and grass.
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  4. #4
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    I used the four point instep crampons for 8 years of hiking in the Chugach (mostly), year round in all conditions and loved them. The only issue is that they can roll on you if you don't strap them just right. I never had the damage any shoes. They were one of the most important items (in the long run) on my (successful) goat hunt.
    That said, this last winter I found the 6 point instep crampons from Campmor.com similar to these http://www.ems.com/catalog/product_d...formics_Nextag
    and I have never worn the 4 pointers again. Once adjusted they never roll on you. The extra two points on the heels make going down hill on glare ice a breeze. The only downside is they are a little bulky, but I tend to put them on at the start of a hike and they stay on until I am back at my truck.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I have some Grivel crampons very similar to these. I've never found the need for them while sheep hunting, but may pack them along on my October hunt this year. I'd be happy to loan them to you for your hunt if you'd like to get away without another gear purchase, LuJon. At the very least, you could play with them on your scouting trip. Just let me know.


  6. #6
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    I've got the Kahtoolas, too. I haven't compared them to others, but they serve very well for snowpack and snotgrass when there's a sharp vertical turn downslope from you and - as Kay9Cop wisely noted - the bottom is a long way down.

    I appreciate that they're quick to put on and take back off. I can tuck them under an elastic strap when I get back to the rocks and they don't clank around. Kahtoola makes a 1oz no-puncture bag for them so they don't stab the rest of the stuff in your pack, but I haven't found it necessary. Careful packing has served me so far.

  7. #7

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    There's a brand name called Camp that makes some really light crampons that I've been meaning to buy. One of their models look like they're somewhere in size between instep creepers and crampons.

    I also came across this ultralight axe while shopping online for a new pack: http://www.ula-equipment.com/helix.htm I think the story is that it's so light that it's not certified as an ice axe, but it makes a fine "potty trowel" for those times when you don't feel like carrying a full-on ice axe but want the utility of having one available just in case.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

  8. #8

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    I read some good reviews about these.. http://store.everestgear.com/421100.html

    I got a pair off eBay for ~$50. Plan to try them out this fall. Nice light weight option to consider.

  9. #9
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    Default In-steps

    I used the in-steps on a goat hunt last Sept. As stated earlier, great tracktion graber on wet grass and do help on the ice. If you plan on getting into any real ice I prefer the full crampons. The insteps will turn and the lack of any toe grip makes going straight up a challange.

  10. #10

    Default Crampons are great but be careful

    Crampons are great and If I was specifically hunting a glacier I definitely would have them with me.

    There is one caveat about them. You can climb into country that is difficult to climb down from. Somehow or another it is often easier to climb up into a place than climb down.

    This is especially true if you have a goat or sheep that you are packing. Just be careful and know you limitations and learn how to use them before you get yourself in trouble. Twisted ankles, hurt knees and the cat syndrome where you are stuck on a mountain that is trully bugger to climb down from.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas

  11. #11

    Default Crampons

    There's always lots of gear that you may use or might be a good idea. Crampons on this particulary hunt would fall into that category. I've hunted the same season in the same unit and never had the thought "I wish I had crampons." I think they'd be extra dead weight IMO. I'd recommend extra tent stakes and guy lines for your tent. If it's anything like my hunt, you're going to need those worse than crampons.

    I often take a dozen sheet metal screws with me. If you pre-tap the soles of your boots you can twist them in without a tool for the emergency icefield crossing.

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