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Thread: .44 bear loads on the market today

  1. #1

    Default .44 bear loads on the market today

    Being the new owner of a Redhawk .44 with a 5.5" barrel I am now looking for some good bear loads, I started looking at Corbon's website and found these:

    320 GR. HC 1175 FPS/ 981 FTLBS. Pretty impressive for sure.

    Then I took a look at Buffalo Bore ammo, and found these, which look even more impressive:

    305 gr. L.B.T.- L.F.N. (1325 fps / M.E. 1189 ft. lbs.)

    Then I scroll down and holy crap:

    340 gr. LBT-LFN GC . (1478 f ps / M.E. 1649 ft. lbs.)

    340 grains at 1400 fps? Without breaking your hand? I want a good and powerful load but those seem pretty excessive, I have a hard time seeing myself getting much of a followup shot or doing much handwriting the next day after shooting those loads.

    So what does everyone else recommend? It seems like power vs manageability is a fine balance, with some of those well in excess of that fine balance.

  2. #2
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Default try arctic ammo

    they sell a 300 gr. loaded hot, brisk but shootable. They come in a nifty case that fits in your pocket.

  3. #3
    Member Silvertip-CO's Avatar
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    Default

    That 340 grain at 1600 ft lbs sounds like rifle ammo. You better be careful. Not all 44 mag ammo is for pistols. Shame to ruin a good handgun. Or your hand.

  4. #4

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    Have you looked at Garret Cartridges

    http://www.garrettcartridges.com/

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    Default do you know

    Quote Originally Posted by cmccull166 View Post
    Have you looked at Garret Cartridges

    http://www.garrettcartridges.com/

    Is there anywhere in Alaska to buy Garretts? I've been trying to find some for a while, no luck yet.

  6. #6

    Default

    been a few years --but Im sure you buy direct

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    Default

    For big bears recoil has to be learned and managed, grip control and the use of the dbl. action is key. I would not opt for any load going over 1400fps., it is alot to handle and get a follow up shot quickly unless..................you have done some shooting with the big heavies.

    My son has the Redhwk 45LC and that grip contour is tough on the hands with big loads. May consider buying the Pach. models to help absorb that "in the web type beating". Nice handgun that you will enjoy for many yrs.

    Practice first with some med. range loads and then do the heavies---hand control/trigger control-----reload if you can.

    regards,

  8. #8

    Default

    Make sure you know what the "test firearm" was. It may have been a longer bbl gun like a contender which produces higher velocities. The 5.5" bbl will give you less.

    A good way of managing recoil is to also purchase a S & W model 500 in .50 cal and shoot 20 rounds of Corbon 440 gr. hard cast out of it. Then shoot your Redhawk. It will feel like a .38.

    grizz106 has some valid ideas. I would also "magnaport" the bbl as that really help with "felt" recoil. I have my Ruger .44, Dan Wesson .445, Freedom Arms .454, and S & W 500 ported. The S & W comes that way.

    Good luck and have fun.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Times 2 on the Garrets... I carry these in my 44 and 45/70

    He will ship to Alaska now, but you'll have to pay the 'hazmat' shipping charge.

  10. #10

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    I haven't shot any bears with a pistol but I have shot heavy hard cast loads extensively. I personally hate ported guns. I have shot the 460 and 500 S&W's quite a bit and their recoil in my estimation is nothing to get excited about. The muzzle blast, particularly in the 460 was offensive to my sinuses. My 45LC with 335gr. hardcast loads over a max charge of H110 recoils much more, than either. I haven't shot the Garret 340gr. loads, but would probably take a look if I felt like using my .44 for bear protection. Anything in the 320gr. area at 1100+ fps. will probably serve you well. Practice is the most important thing. Don't fill the cylinder with 340gr. Garret loads and head into the woods.

  11. #11
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    Double Tap Ammo sells a 320 grain WFN that works really well. I chonographed them out of my 6.5-inch M29 and they went right around 1,250 fps. While the recoil is stout, it's not bad at all.

    I too don't find the .500 Smith X-frames all that hard recoiling. They are big, heavy and compensated, and that tames their recoil quite significantly. You want painful, shoot an SRH in .454 Casull with Double Tap's 400 grain loads.........

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    Garrets... I also carry these in my 44 and 45/70. Great stuff!!!

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    Anybody know if the S&W 329PD in 44 mag can take +p loads?

  14. #14

    Default 329pd

    It is not necessarily if the gun can take it, though I don't recommend it in any S&W in any regular amount, but I have never heard of a .44 +P load. You probably mean one of the heavy bullet loads. The felt recoil on the 329PD is horrendous for anyone but a pure recoil junkie. Very light gun + heavy mag load = %$#@*. Be aware that because of the titanium cylinder in that gun, the "spring/spring back" factor can cause hard extraction and the chance for a bullet jumping crimp in a very light gun with a heavy load increases.
    Any 300-320grain bullet between 1150-1250 works well.

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    I'm sure they can take it, but I wouldn't feed them a steady diet of the heavy stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    It is not necessarily if the gun can take it, though I don't recommend it in any S&W in any regular amount, but I have never heard of a .44 +P load. You probably mean one of the heavy bullet loads. The felt recoil on the 329PD is horrendous for anyone but a pure recoil junkie. Very light gun + heavy mag load = %$#@*. Be aware that because of the titanium cylinder in that gun, the "spring/spring back" factor can cause hard extraction and the chance for a bullet jumping crimp in a very light gun with a heavy load increases.
    Any 300-320grain bullet between 1150-1250 works well.
    http://www.buffalobore.com/ammunition/default.htm

  17. #17

    Default Buffalo Bore .44 mag +P+

    Yeah, that's a real crazy load there Vern. As has often been printed, correctly, that type of velocity is unnecessary. With a massive (for .44 mag) 340 grain bullet, probably 1250 fps is all that would be needed for excellent penetration. I also noticed that Buffalo Bore doesn't suggest that load for ANY S&W.
    You know, a +P rating used to mean for a heavier .38 Special load, between .38 & .357. I guess it is just semantics now. Any heavier then normal load for whatever cartridge you have is considered +P. Works for me.
    I have always felt that Buffalo Bore has occasionally gone, er, a bit over the top with some of their loads. I still believe that.

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