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Thread: Chessie and Chocolate Lab Mix

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Default Chessie and Chocolate Lab Mix

    Chessie and Chocolate Lab Mix

    What would most likely be the traits of a mix like this?

    I may have the opportunity for a mixed pup.

    Both the Chessie and the Chocolate Lab are AKC registered. They are both great looking dogs. We all got together for a card game and it that is where the owner of the Ch. Lab met the owner of the Chessie.


    Of the least importance would the pups be able to be AKC registered as anything?
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    Chessie and Chocolate Lab Mix

    What would most likely be the traits of a mix like this?

    I may have the opportunity for a mixed pup.

    Both the Chessie and the Chocolate Lab are AKC registered. They are both great looking dogs. We all got together for a card game and it that is where the owner of the Ch. Lab met the owner of the Chessie.


    Of the least importance would the pups be able to be AKC registered as anything?
    In answer to your last question, the answer is, NO.

    In answer to your first question, the answer is why? Why would you take the traits of two separate breeds that have and combine to loose the best of both. They are characteristics that mark each breed as desirable to each breed. Of a often seen trait in a cross breed is what is know as Hy-bred vigor. This may or may not be a welcome trait. Usually desirable do to close or near inbreeding.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Can you be more specific? What traits would be lost? What traits would most likely remain?

    I dont know squat about dogs so I really cannot even guess what your first post meant.

    I dont care about the pups being registeredas anything. It was just a question that came up during conversation.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    Chessie and Chocolate Lab Mix

    What would most likely be the traits of a mix like this?

    I may have the opportunity for a mixed pup.

    Both the Chessie and the Chocolate Lab are AKC registered. They are both great looking dogs. We all got together for a card game and it that is where the owner of the Ch. Lab met the owner of the Chessie.


    Of the least importance would the pups be able to be AKC registered as anything?
    WHY WHY WHY!!!!!!!
    How bout breeding a Golden and a pitbull
    Sometimes people really disappoint me --But sounds like it will be a
    aggressive unintelligent litter
    Just my opinion

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    Default What??

    Im not understanding any of yalls responces. I had a chessie/lab mix and she was a great dog enjoyed the heck out of retrieving was not even remotly aggresive was picking up on the training really well. She just really liked to roam if you werent watching her really closly. Due to an uninformed dog sitter she ran off while i was TDY. I would have expected her to become a great hunting partner. Just my 2 cents take it as you will
    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting "HOLY **** WHAT A RIDE!!!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    Can you be more specific? What traits would be lost? What traits would most likely remain?

    Hard to say which would be a loss and where you would find a gain. So you get the litter you want, two pups are kept out of the litter, then what?

    The heavy oily coat of the Chessie. Breed for this coat (needed in much more frigid waters than Jolly Old England) The reason I favor Cheeses over labs, they are a one man dog. Loyalty to one man, it is not the breeding for labs. This is the biggest reason field trial people stay away from the breed. Labs will do their thing for anybody. This makes them more sell able, more than a Chessie.

    I dont know squat about dogs so I really cannot even guess what your first post meant.

    The hard cold fact about the different breeds of using dogs is simply this. You get what you pay for. The cheapest part of dogs, is the up front cost of buying a pup. That money pales in what you will pay over the life of the dog. Unless you are not the "until death do us part" type of dog owner.

    Why do so many field trial dogs fail to meet a standard? (read that as Labs) Simply because they have been over bred by back yard breeders.
    Not looking to enhance the breed, for the role the dogs were originally bred for.


    I dont care about the pups being registeredas anything. It was just a question that came up during conversation.
    That was your last question in your first post?

    Knowledge of the charistics of the individual breed is key to getting what you think you need a dog for. Also you need this information to get the best benefits for your training program. Asking yourself a list of basic questions will give you the knowledge of what to look for and the questions asked of a reputable breeder.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Default Again Why?

    I agree with above posts...breeds were developed for certain qualities and should be kept intact. Over breeding and mixed breeding can be a disaster. Breeding should be done to improve the breed and provide quality hunting dogs.

    If there were an accidental breeding, I can see saving the pups and getting the best out of them. And yes, you can have a mixed breed pup who becomes a quality hunting companion, but why do it on purpose and not be certain of the results.

    It is hard enough to produce pups with desired traits using genetics of well bred dogs, but the chances are much better of getting what you want if you do. You cannot know the outcome and the traits that will come from a mixed breed.

    You dont close your eyes when you shoot...I hope

  8. #8

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    Wow, never thought this sort of topic would yield such strong opinions. So, that being said here's my two cents worth.

    My uncle picked up a choc lab chessie mix as a small puppy and it turned out to be an awesome dog. Hunted, never bit too hard on the ducks. Played fetch as long as you could. Protected the kids while they played in the yard. Never ran off, and btw, it weighed in at 156 pounds when it was barely over two years old and it sure wasn't fat, he was just a big boy. Lived to be over 18 years old before they had to put him down. His last year he started getting cranky but up until then he was a terrific dog. Name was Jake.

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    These are great posts guys.

    Thanks.

    I would just be looking for a dog that can handle being around kids.

    I think labs are too spastic. The Chessie I met seems to behave better. The Chessie was also much larger which I liked too.

    Both dogs are four years old and both are a beautiful chocolate color. Seems to me there would be no problem finding homes for the pups. Since everyone at the discussion said they would take two except for me. One would be enough for me. I actually have only this once agreed to get a dog because I know for me it would be a lifelong decision.

    I would only need the dog to learn basic dog commands. I would not be using the dog for hunting.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Default Mixing breeds. What to expect ...

    You never know with a registered breeding never mind a mixed breeding. In a litter of 9 puppies I've seen every personality. Not all labs are "spastic" , not all chessies are aggressive or large but with a registered breed you have a better chance of getting what you want.
    I love my mixed dog (great dane, Greyhound) and would love if there was a breed, kind of a Lite Dane but there isn't and to get another just like her would take generations of unwanted pups. A woman in the mid-west sent me a photo of her Great Dane Greyhound. She looks and acts completly different.
    I have a field bred AKC lab that is a manic retriever and too active for young kids, another unpapered Lab that is layed back and would be great with little kids. Its not even wise to mix field and show dogs of the same breed. You can get a large boned show lab with a high energy level that will wear themselves and you out.

    What was described here is an emotional desire to get puppies from two dogs you love to replace one you had. It doesnt work that way. It's a backyard breeding producing up to 12 unregister-able pups. Some will likely end up at the shelter. Only If you have 12 stable people that will take a pup for life, no matter how they turn out,then neuter and spay them would it be a responsible breeding. Or if your willing to cull a litter - that is too hard to do.

    Linda
    www.alaskadognews.com

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    Default Tough call

    A couple things of concern for me in your situation.......
    You don't hunt your Lab. That in itself is not really a bad thing. The dogs are very loving and the majority in the nation don't hunt. With gas prices heading up I fear more dogs will miss out on being gun dogs this year. If you get the chance, work your dog. What in the world are you doing on a hunting web site for hunting dogs?

    I'm really concerned about my male dog and what kind of situation I could end up in as he matures. I know, I know get him fixed. I don't want to because I haven't determined if he has the right stuff yet and I live in Sitka leaving me in a remote location without ample breeding stock around. There a couple of other field bred Springers on the island and if Z has good skills as an adult I'd like to continue with his line. I can see how quickly things could change and how an accidental breeding could happen. The ***** owner should have known and communicated the issue to this gentleman. For me it doesn't sound like he planned this.

    Does anybody else have stories of how this could have happened or situations where an accidental breeding took place? I know it happens but what does a guy trying to be responsible do?

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    Bighorse,

    It sounds to me as though this was a planned breeding. Taken place because they had "orders" to fill, for a lack of a better term.

    RMiller. Im always trying to stay neutral in things and have a good time on here, but unscrupulous breeding when the folks who have planned the breeding have no clue what their doing just ruffles my feathers.

    I was a euthanasia tech for 5 years in Colorado, I have seen it all. I have played god and decided I could no longer do it. I wish people would really stand back and see the harm they are doing in not getting their pets spayed or neutered. These so called designer breeds are allover the shelters!

    I have a male here, just needed his majors to finish. He's 4 years old, has 4 years of many shows behind him. Along with a whole bunch of money spent on his health clearances (which he passed) and even more money in entry fees. He's NEUTERED! Not because of any health problems, but because we have no intention of ever using him at stud. I could have bred him many times in the last two years. Not only that, I have just increased his chances of being with us for many more years. No its not a guarantee but at least I know I have done my part....even if it was heart breaking and an end of an era for us.....

    The best thing you can do now, is ask your friend to place these pups on spay/neuter contracts....or spay/neuter them before they are placed. Charge a small fee to cover the cost of the surgery. That would be the responsible thing to do in this case. Thats just one of the many things that separates a reputable/responsible breeder from the BYB's.

    None the less, have fun with your new addition.
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    I had a standing order in with the matsu animal shelter for a spaniel after a couple months they called and told me about a chessie lab mix so I went a gave him a look, thought on it for a couple days as I was just looking for rabbit and grouse dog but the thought of a water dog also seemed like a good idea so I went back and picked him up.


    When I recieved him he was about 15 pounds and I guess about two months old I worked with him for about eight months and work took me oversee's for three months when I came home we stated up again and "mitch" had'nt lost to much to laying around.

    Now he is about almost two years old and he's a great dog for being a mixed breed I was asking some questions on a chessie forum and when I mentioned he was a pound rescued mix breed those people would not give me the time of day told me I was "wasting my time" and "foolish for trying it"

    Well I don't call him by three names he hasn't won any show's and don't have the equipment to sire anything but he points, won't break hold, retrieves, and flush's simply put this dog hunts.


    If you just want a dog that's good with family and will take to the woods check out the animal shelter they don't want to put good dogs down and usually have a want book you can sign into with what your looking for.
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  14. #14

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    Well put rdrash.
    I've had lots of folks bring me mix breeds to train. There have been a lot of good ones. I once was ran off from a picnic trial because I took a clients dog there that was a lab and sheperd mix. A very obvious look.
    This dog stomped the test that was set up. Did better than most of the pure breds. I guess I really ruffled some feathers because it wasn't really a retriever. I didn't think it mattered since the event was a fund raiser.

    For those with their drawers on too tight...... don't get me wrong. I am an avid believer in choosing proven breeding stock. It elimates a lot of problems as far as unwanted traits and hereditary issues. That is... if the breeder... has done all proper clearances before a pair is mated.

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    Default clearances

    I know this subject has been hashed over time and again within dog circles but I believe the clearance factor(health checks) is huge for a buyer of a new dog.

    I/We spend thousands of dollars when all is said and done with our dogs. Its nice to know when you embark on a dog life commitment your looking at an animal with high promise of health in the k9 geriatic years. Now this isn't some my breed is better than yours rant. Its just a simple matter of economics and investment. I don't want to invest all my time in a dog that in the end will only cripple and cost me heart ache and $$$$$.

    So if your getting some flak from dog owners about awkward breeding choices I think there is more history being told than what is being typed on this forum.

    By-the-way my all time favorite dog was Tad a Shepard/Lab. Run, retrieve, athletic, personality he had it all going. Unfortuantly I don't know how his life is now. I only trained and worked with him for 1.5yrs and he was relocated with his owner.

    I not saying buying or breeding a purebreed dog is foolproof. Many people know that industry has gotten questionable because of backyard breeders and puppy mills. Its really expensive to insure and prove your producing a solid line of dogs and in the end may indeed prove unprofitable from a financial standpoint. The guy I bought my last spaniel from really had a history of working and investing in the breed and I could tell by the quality of his kennel and time investment his dogs were a result of a passion for the breed. If you can find a person like that who shows great investment in the breed you should take a further look. Afterall you looking at a 11-18 year commitment.

    It won't be long until Sept. and I'm looking forward to some duck hunting!

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Default Just so everyone knows

    The idea about breeding the two dogs is only that, an idea. The plans are not to do it.

    If I was to get a mutt why not make it a designer mutt like the Lab/Chessie mix. I dont understand why it is O.K. to get a dog from the pound but not O.K. to make my own mutt.

    The only commands any dog I would get would need to know is sit, stay, come, heel and such.

    I will not be getting any dogs soon do to unexpected hardships but I am glad everyone here had helpful (in there own special way) thoughts to share.

    I was looking in the hunting dog forum because these are hunting dog breeds are they not?

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    Default Breeding for a puppy..

    Whether your breeding AKC reg or mixed breeds, unless you plan to cull the litter you end up with more than 1 puppy. After breeding my AKC -MH Labs in 1996, the experience of selling the litter put me off for ever breeding again. Both parents had FC/AFC parents with a long line of top field dogs. Even so, some of those pups went to pet homes and I know of one that was given away. Trying to convince non-competitive or non-hunters that my dogs were worth the $550 was frustrating. I turned down potential buyers if they did not have a clue. Eventually they were all sold by 9 weeks of age.
    I realized then I would buy my next retriever, not make it.
    The difference in getting a dog from the pound is that he is "one" dog. Not a litter of 9,10,12 little individual dogs. What you loose with a shelter dog is the early training ,development and then have to re-train. Shelter dogs do not display their entire personalty until months after they are home but you have some indication of their basic temperment.
    So, far the three that we have display(ed) a neediness, anxioty and are unpredictable adults. I am learning some ways to deal with this and by the third one it seems we are gaining trust and the dog is responding better. While the trianing for the new dog is like puppy and young adult training (only 70 lbs heavier and stronger) I'm not missing the puppy stage right now.

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    Hi RMiller,

    Not only that, your saving a life that would otherwise die in the shelter, if you were to get a pup from this litter that would be one less available home. Why add more puppies to the world when there are already cross breeds allover the place in shelters? What would be interesting is if we could know each person who bred each of those dogs in the shelter, I wonder how many of them had "good homes" picked out. You have to remember, the dogs in the shelter all had a "breeder" they didn't just come out of thin air. I'm with Linda, I'm not missing the puppy stage at all. I have 4 grown dogs, and I'm headed to the pound or rescue for my own mutt when these guys move on.



    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    The idea about breeding the two dogs is only that, an idea. The plans are not to do it.

    If I was to get a mutt why not make it a designer mutt like the Lab/Chessie mix. I dont understand why it is O.K. to get a dog from the pound but not O.K. to make my own mutt.

    The only commands any dog I would get would need to know is sit, stay, come, heel and such.

    I will not be getting any dogs soon do to unexpected hardships but I am glad everyone here had helpful (in there own special way) thoughts to share.

    I was looking in the hunting dog forum because these are hunting dog breeds are they not?
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    I'd take one if it was a male. I want a full-size cheesie or chocolate lab and if it's mixed, even better.

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    Matt,,


    Its your lucky day there is one listed in Anchorage Animal control a Chessie. Lab mix.....

    CHILI (A149392)
    ChocolateLabrador Retriever and Chesapeake Bay Retriever5 years old06/26/2008Anchorage Animal Control
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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