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Thread: Game Bags on Sheep Hunts

  1. #1

    Default Game Bags on Sheep Hunts

    Wondering if any of you bring them or are they not needed. If you do how many of the standard size bags per animal. Thanks.

  2. #2

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    We always have them. Usually use pillow cases for sheep or caribou. Six to eight for each animal.
    Joe (Ak)

    Quote Originally Posted by ihntak View Post
    Wondering if any of you bring them or are they not needed. If you do how many of the standard size bags per animal. Thanks.

  3. #3
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default

    I use the TAG synthetic bags, I only take 4 of the caribou size because I bone out the meat to make the pack out lighter. The synthetic bags are much lighter than cotton.


    Steve

  4. #4
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default game bags...

    I also use pillow cases as game bags for sheep and mt. goats. I plan on four per sheep, five per goat. Three or four pillow cases for the de-boned meat, and one for the cape. I buy them two-for-a-dollar at those Army-Navy type junk stores like the one near Spenard Builders Supply in Anchorage. Search through those old pillow cases to find the ones without any holes or those big ***** flys will get into the meat bags on your August sheep hunts. Although they appear to have been already washed, I wash them all again.
    Dennis
    AK TAGS

  5. #5
    Member KenaiJay's Avatar
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    Default Kifaru

    I went ahead and spent the bucks for Kifaru bags...Nice and light (1-2oz). I then transfer the meat to a cotton game bag and/or 5-gallon bucket (which gets set in a cool stream) when I get back to base camp.

  6. #6
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    I've been using TAG bags and bring six; I use one for each quarter, a smaller one for the loins and back straps, and one for the cape to protect it from flies as well.

    I've never seen the Kifaru bags. Have a link?
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

  7. #7
    Member KenaiJay's Avatar
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    Default Kifaru II

    Kay9-

    Its www.kifaru.net The meat bag, which I like alot, is 1oz. The quarter bag is 2.7oz

    I prefer the meat bag, as I bone out my sheep. It works as advertised as it keeps its shape and fits inside my Kifaru internal pack great.

    Where do you work?

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I'm another pillow case guy. 10 per moose, 6 per caribou, 4 for sheep and 2 for Sitka Blacktail.

    KenaiJay- Do you put the lid on the 5 gallon bucket? If so, with cold water do you have any issues with meat going bad? I am thinking of doing the same thing on a fly-in goat hunt and will have a cold lake to put the buckets in.

  9. #9
    Member KenaiJay's Avatar
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    Default Buckets

    Yes, I put lids on the buckets...I actually bring two empty buckets (just right for a sheep). I dig down into the creek/lake bed and place a bunch of large rocks around it. The buckets sits down so that 6" or so is above the waterline. The meat, as you can imagine, stays nice and cold. The pilots love it because the buckets are nice and clean.

  10. #10
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    On fly-in's I use two 5 gallon buckets to haul in my food and other camp goodies just for the sake of organization. I then empty the stuff into stuff sacks when I get there and use the buckets to haul/store water. I think I will throw a couple more in this year for goat and deer meat. I may completely submerge them to keep the bears from smelling them. Thanks for the tip.

  11. #11

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    Thanks guys. I was actually thinking about bringing a couple heavy duty trash bags and pack the meat out in them. If I can't make it out by night I can put the bags in a stream.

  12. #12

    Default trash bags

    I have always used trash bags for my meat. Boned out in the bags. Triple bagged and in the creek asap. We usually make a rocked in place and set the bags in and then open them up the first evening. We will triple bag them and keep them submerged if needed. Had meat like that for 5 days and it was excellent.

  13. #13
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    Default cotton and plastic

    I think the keys to game bags are strength and absorbency. I usually bring 2 or 3 cotton or absorbent synthetic bags and then a couple of the big, thick contractor bags. The plastic bags work great for keeping everything else in your pack clean and the big ones could be a pretty nice emergency shelter. I have also found it much easier to load a plastic bag lined pack with game bags than trying to wrestle them through the neck of a pack.

    I have never used buckets in streams; it sounds like a great idea. Buckets are great for so many other things as well; truly multi-purpose. In the past I have used submerged plastic bags or dry bags with good success because they form fit to the meat and allow more contact with the cooling waters.

    If you are around glaciers or snow slides they make great cold storage. Make sure you have your meat protected from the surface of the snow though, that rock flour will destroy the surface of your meat.

    If you are not going to be able cool your meat in a stream make sure you take your game bags and meat out of the plastic bags and hang the whole show. It will allow air movement around the bags and cause better cooling through evaporation. The moving air also keeps down the bacterial growth that will occur more quickly in a plastic bag.

    For hides I almost never use the plastic bags unless they are real bloody. I have seen a couple of hides ruined in just a couple days because of the use of plastic bags.


    WHEW! Enough of that diatribe.

  14. #14
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    Default Gamma Seal lids

    I would get a couple of these lids to use with the buckets. First you snap on an o-ring sealed adapter and then you can screw on a top that is almost the full size of the bucket top. They are air tight and waterproof.

    Here is a link.
    http://www.gammaplastics.com/new/GSL.html

  15. #15

    Default Two Walmart Drybags.

    I take one cheap polyplastic feed bag for cape and horns.
    1 take two 50L yellow stansport water rubberized drybags for meat-they roll up to be pretty small. I also use these for food and clothing bags and collapse them as I work my way through the food.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas

  16. #16
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    Default

    TAG bags and then put them into compactor bags while they are in the pack.

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