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Thread: S&W M28 value opinions

  1. #1
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default S&W M28 value opinions

    I have a older 4 screw (screw down on the trigger guard) Smith and Wesson M-28 Highway patrolman 357 Mag with a 6 inch barrel.

    I never shoot it and the guy I got it from years ago must not have either. It is in 95% condition, except they guy I got it from removed and lost the old original small grips and at some time or another put on the larger magnum grips...

    Anyway, has anyone bought or sold an older S&W N -frame lately??? I was thinking about selling it to fund a rifle project...
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    You might want to ask these guys:
    http://smith-wessonforum.com/eve/

    You can usually sell it for more on gunbrokers than you can FTF in Alaska as .357's are often not a caliber of choice up here.
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I can remember back when it was just fine, except for the very few guys who had 44s and 41s..

    I already have a couple other 357s (Pythons and an old pre-model number N-frame) so I really don't need another safe queen...
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    About a year and a half ago I bought a 1976 vintage with a six inch barrel, this is a dash 2, new in the box, honestly, but had to pay $600 for it. It had all original papers, screw driver, cleaning rod and swab all original gun. The older ones are just selling for more money. Personally the fourth screw model isn't my preference but I think they sell for more than the three screw models like mine. I sold a four screw 29 no dash for $850 with the box but it was not new. I passed up a five inch M27-2 as new in the box for $900 and I wanted that one really bad but didn't have the cash. Look around the gun sites there are some good guns like your that go for $500 to $900. I paid $800 for a M24 3" 44 spcl back a few months ago. There are enough of us out there that really like the old S&W's to keep the value up.
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  5. #5
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    You ever notice that the threading on the ejector rod of the old 5 Screw and early 4 screw M-29s is in the opposite direction of the newer ones? My old 44 mags will let the ejector rod unscrew under recoil until they jam the cylinder. So they are lock-tited down...

    I have not checked this m-28, but with the 357 the recoil would probably not unscrew the rod anyway...

    I think I bought thisone as a trip down memory lane. A M-28 Highway Patrolman (6 inch) was my first smokeless powder handgun.
    Followed a few weeks later by a Browning Hi-power and then a flood of oddball things... I was not old enough to drive legally, but I had some nice shootin irons.....

    Back when a 14 year old could make good money on a fishing boat...
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    You ever notice that the threading on the ejector rod of the old 5 Screw and early 4 screw M-29s is in the opposite direction of the newer ones? My old 44 mags will let the ejector rod unscrew under recoil until they jam the cylinder. So they are lock-tited down...

    I have not checked this m-28, but with the 357 the recoil would probably not unscrew the rod anyway...

    I think I bought thisone as a trip down memory lane. A M-28 Highway Patrolman (6 inch) was my first smokeless powder handgun.
    Followed a few weeks later by a Browning Hi-power and then a flood of oddball things... I was not old enough to drive legally, but I had some nice shootin irons.....

    Back when a 14 year old could make good money on a fishing boat...
    Those were the days. When a lad could walk into a local hardware store and plop down a handful of hard eaned cash and fetch home a fine shootin' iron....I miss that old hardware store.

    I believe the left hand threaded ejector rod was started in 1960 and that change occured with the three screw side plate and was stamped dash one (M28-1). In 1962 they dropped the fourth screw in front of the trigger guard and called it a dash two. So.....Your M28 was made between 1954 (When it was introduced) and 1960 if it is right hand thread. Your serial number should be between S175,000 (three screw sideplate) and S181,000 (stamping model in the yoke) and/or S207,001 when they started the left hand thread.

    That gun should be worth a nice price.
    Last edited by Murphy; 07-01-2008 at 07:51.
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  7. #7
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    The yoke stamp only says M-28. No Dash,,, but also only a three screw side plate.
    S203,6XX
    A slight ring on the cylinder and some blue wear by the end of the muzzle.

    I used to have a spare set of grip stocks from my old M-28 from almost 40 years ago. I can't figure out where the heck they are. Heck, it took me an hour to figure out where I had this thing hidden so I could check the numbers.
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  8. #8

    Default M-28 a keeper

    If it was me and it wasn't a matter of money, I'd keep the 28. They are wonderful guns even without the high polish blue of the 27. They are also incredibly strong, real tanks. I used to have one years ago for developing loads. I worked up 180 grain loads for metallic silhouette
    in it that I really shouldn't have and that Patrolman took it all in stride. Maybe the caliber is not highly popular here, but it's a great gun. Go forth and shoot it!!

  9. #9
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    No doubt about it, I love older S&Ws as well. Although this has become a safe queen.

    I blew my rifle money on an old Husqvarna rifle for my eldest daughter and that rifle is not really working out. But I really like it.... SO...... I am still looking to give her a rifle and the only sixgun that I never shoot is this M-28. To sell or trade.

    Maybe business will pick-up... so far I have had several cancellations from out-of-state pilots who spent all their Alaska trip money on driving to work and heating their houses.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    The yoke stamp only says M-28. No Dash,,, but also only a three screw side plate.
    S203,6XX
    A slight ring on the cylinder and some blue wear by the end of the muzzle.

    I used to have a spare set of grip stocks from my old M-28 from almost 40 years ago. I can't figure out where the heck they are. Heck, it took me an hour to figure out where I had this thing hidden so I could check the numbers.

    Yeah. I corrected my error on the previous post, 175,000 is when they started with the 3 screw plate, and at 181,000 they began the model stamping in the yoke and it would be only M28, they didn't stamp dash numbers until much later. Yours will be right handed threads on the ejector rod.

    My 28 came with the standard service stocks and I have tried to find a nice set of the Magna full size grips but don't want to pay the 100 plus bucks for e-bay prices. My 58 got the first set of magna grips I found, it also had the service stocks with the diamond center. I do have a rather rough set of these magna stocks but wanted something nice. I have a set of rough grips but am looking for a nice set.
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  11. #11
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    Default Ah, Model 28's....

    May of 1970, my Mother and I went together and bought Dad a six inch S&W .357, just like he said he wanted. How was I to know that he wanted a Model 19? He smiled, worked that six inch Model 28, and has never quit using it. Still wears the original Magna grips, too. I later sprung for a S&W carry holster for the thing, and he put it on one of his old Sam Browne belts.
    I picked up a four inch two years ago. Mine, however, isn't marked Model 28. It also has four sideplate screws and a fifth in front of the trigger guard. All the serial numbered parts match, but I had to find a good set of diamond Magnas to go on it. S prefix serial number.
    Beautiful old gun. About the same vintage as my .38-44 HD transition gun from the early fifties.
    I think I'd just as soon use this M28 as my Model 27. It's every bit as smooth, locks up a bit tighter, and I don't worry so much about having it in a holster when cruising throught he brush.
    Dare I mention that I gave $250 for the early gun two years ago? Caught the pawn shop owner off guard, and stole that one. Even around here, nice 28's run $350 on the low end to around $600 for very nice examples.

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