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Thread: Large Halibut/Breeders...

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    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Question Large Halibut/Breeders...

    How many of you would keep a trophy sized *250lb+* halibut?

    How many of you would keep more than one?

    I was just reading how a 319lb hog was taken out of Seward near Mont. Island I am sure... and it was taken by a Charter Owner...someone who has taken numerous fish some of which I am sure have been near or above the 250lb mark.

    Now... before I go to far I want to clarify that I am not trying to lynch this guy... Just simply bringing up a situation.

    I have been lucky enough to catch a large halibut, 238lbs which wasn't enough to be considered a "trophy" by the states standards but definitely in my book it was. I personally won't keep another one of that size.

    So I am just curious what you all think about keeping the breeding stock in the water?


    *** I would also like to point out he had a Seward Derby Ticket...and he will probably win.***
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKArcher View Post
    How many of you would keep a trophy sized *250lb+* halibut?

    How many of you would keep more than one?

    I was just reading how a 319lb hog was taken out of Seward near Mont. Island I am sure... and it was taken by a Charter Owner...someone who has taken numerous fish some of which I am sure have been near or above the 250lb mark.

    Now... before I go to far I want to clarify that I am not trying to lynch this guy... Just simply bringing up a situation.

    I have been lucky enough to catch a large halibut, 238lbs which wasn't enough to be considered a "trophy" by the states standards but definitely in my book it was. I personally won't keep another one of that size.

    So I am just curious what you all think about keeping the breeding stock in the water?


    *** I would also like to point out he had a Seward Derby Ticket...and he will probably win.***
    maybe the question should be "how many of you would keep an virtually-certain derby-winner/$10,000 prize"? 10k can ease a lot of conscience.

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    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gretchen View Post
    maybe the question should be "how many of you would keep an virtually-certain derby-winner/$10,000 prize"? 10k can ease a lot of conscience.
    I noted that because it had some relevance....

    It was mentioned in the article that he would be giving half of the winnings if he won to the rest of the people on the boat, and the other half to cancer research.
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

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    Default Large Halibut

    One big Halibut will not make any difference! If fact the total Alaska sport harvest makes very little impact on large Halibut. Sure it would be better for the resource not to target large female Halibut. But lets not forget sport harvest is less than 20% of the total Halibut harvested in Alaska.

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    Default Oh, C'mon

    Man that is funny stuff!!!


    Ok how much of the total % is harvested in areas that also have a sport catch? Comparing the millions of pounds that come out of the bering sea to sport catch in UCI or the southeast is pretty odd. In fact.........funny stuff.

    Now even close to reality? nah. The reason why people don't trust statistics? nah. go ahead and talk about total harvest worldwide commercially and compare it to sportfish in your back yard. About as accurate a statement.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert johnson View Post
    One big Halibut will not make any difference!
    Are you aware of how many eggs one large halibut produces? It is not insignificant by any stretch.

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    Default Retaining large fish

    Just to put in perspective, the 2006 commercial catch in Area 3A was 25.7 million lbs. Sport catch 5.3 million lbs, of which 3.5 was charters.

    So, you may feel guilty about clubbing a 300 lb female (or 238), but to a commercial boat that is a $1000 fish. They would not even consider not keeping it. To a charter, that is great advertising--they want everyone to see it.

    Lots of big females get killed. I admit that 3A is a big area compared to the Montague area, but halibut migrate far distances and I don't know of any local stock assessments.

    This is neither a pro or anti commercial fishing post, but you should not feel too guilty about keeping the biggest halibut you will probably ever catch. Any halibut over 100 lbs is likely a female.

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Default Hogwash!

    Just more excuses to systematically cleansing the population of its most valuable breeding stock.

    Just let 'em go!
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    Default Large Halibut

    Don't get me wrong boys! I don't like the idea of killing large female Halibut. But it's not against the law.
    The average sport caught Halibut in Cook inlet is 17-20lb. Halibut over 100 lb make up a VERY small portion of the sport catch.
    What do you think will happen if/when sport anglers are only allowed to harvest one fish per day?

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    Default Grammatical typo!

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    Just more excuses to systematically cleanse the population of its most valuable breeding stock.

    Just let 'em go!
    Sorry... too late to edit.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    Default near prime vs. past prime breeding age....

    here is another way to look at it...
    one big halibut does produce an incredible number of eggs, no one will deny that....BUT.... lets just say that one boat ( a hypothetical boat) catches a dozen fish a day.... over a week that is 84 fish.... two are over 200 lbs.... 10 are 100+ lbs,30 are spawners between 40 and 75 lbs... the rest are smaller, some spawners, some chickens, some males...
    anyhow, the greatest reproductive potential (most potential eggs) removed is the 40 mid-size spawners, not only are they removed for the year, they are removed for the rest of their potential spawning years, which is far more potential then a couple large females near the end of their reproductive career.
    so in this light the "big" females are worth less, in reproductive value, then the mid-size fish that are nearing their prime, not past it....
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert johnson View Post
    The average sport caught Halibut in Cook inlet is 17-20lb. Halibut over 100 lb make up a VERY small portion of the sport catch.
    Wonder why? Maybe that's because so very FEW halibut live long enough to reach that size?

    Seems that would make that rare fish all the more valuable... and all the more senseless to purposely kill.

    Halibut are an incredibly hardy fish that can withstand rough handling. They are an excellent C&R fish. The biggest problem is the fleet is releasing all the wrong fish... high-grading dinks for slabs!

    Sturgeon are another large bottom-dweller where the biggest fish are the breeding females... carrying bazillions of eggs. They are managed with an upper size limit (slot limit) over which every fish reaching that size gets a free pass.

    Release the giant she-pigs. It's the gift that keeps on giving. Several of your fellow anglers may share the thrill in catching the same mother hoss... PLUS... she will continue to create millions of baby halibut for all of us to enjoy in the future.

    Like the NIKE commercial says, "Just do it!"
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    Default letin um go

    We let 6 fish go between about 180 and 240 last year. My feeling on the issue is this:

    There are only a few really large halibut around and they have avoided predation and disease for thirty years. These fish have exactly the kind of favorable traits that we all want our future halibut to have. For this reason, I encourage my clients, especially on mulitday trips to take the better eating fish from 50 - 80 pounds and let the big females go.

    With that said, if my guys catch a big fish and want to keep it, I will take it as it is their right to keep them. Last year we did kill a 329 pound fish, it was the wish of the fisherman to keep um.

    Seems like the fishermen who pay for the mulit day trips are not really fishing so much for their freezer as they are looking for some great fishing. Both of my last two three day trips the groups of 6 - 8 fishermen took a total of 10 - 12 halibut for the entire trip.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKArcher View Post

    I was just reading how a 319lb hog was taken out of Seward near Mont. Island I am sure...

    *** I would also like to point out he had a Seward Derby Ticket...and he will probably win.***
    Here's the pic:



    Looks like he caught it on one of those newer Wright/McGill Magnum Plug Rods.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert johnson View Post
    Halibut over 100 lb make up a VERY small portion of the sport catch.
    If they make up a very small portion of the catch, doesn't it serve to reason that they make up a very small portion of the overall population? And if they do indeed make up a very small portion of the population, doesn't that make it even more important to protect them?

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    How big do Halibut need to be to breed? From what I understand most fish growth is dependent predominantly on food suply, so it seems like for a given area most fish would grow at similar rates. The other question I have is how long do halibut live? It seems posible that HomerDave is correct if these large fish are near the end of there lives they may not have as much affect on the population as some of the smaller fish.

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    So how would you fix this issue? A slot limit?
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    Gary Keller
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    I say people should just keep chickens. They taste better, are easier to handle, and have less mercury in their meat.

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    Default

    i have filleted quite a few large halibut and all i can say is blech. they are not worth the amount of freezer space they fill dead in my opinion. i think the derby committee should offer two jackpots. one for the largest and one for the largest released. the total jackpot could be split 50/50 between the two prizes so that whoever catches the large mamas dont have to kill a fish if they dont want to. anyone know of a safe way to pull a tape on a 250 pound halibut and take a pic safely?

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    Member Flintlock's Avatar
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    I have fished my whole life and have spent countless dollars on trips, gear, tackle, chaters, etc. The largest halibut I have ever caught is only 90 pounds. I have spent years fishing the Alaskan salt waters out of Homer and Seward and I can assure you that for many of us a 200 or 300 pound halibut is a once in a lifetime fish. If I am ever fortunate enough to catch one, I will definitely keep it.

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