Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 49

Thread: What kind of gun did your Granddad use?

  1. #1

    Default What kind of gun did your Granddad use?

    It's interesting to look back sometimes.My Granddads were mainly deer hunters--both favored lever actions (of course lever rifles were king in those days).My maternal Granddad used a Winchester 1894 in 38-55,while my paternal Granddad used a Marlin (I believe a model 1893) in 32-40. I'm also fortunate enough to have a photo (which was taken with one of the old type cameras that developed the photo on a piece of tin) of my Great Uncle,Great Granddad,and Great-Great Granddad.They are standing next to two model T Fords--with two big bucks on the running boards. My Great Granddad had an 1894 Winchester,while my Great Uncle had some type of long barreled shotgun.Great-Great Granddad was unarmed--in the photo at least Of course,they hunted other things as well--like snowshoe hares and grouse and who knows what else--and had shotguns,.22s,and who knows what else. What type of guns did your Granddads use?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Valley trash.....and proud of it.
    Posts
    813

    Default

    None, I grew up in a very anti-gun family. Good thing I always was the black sheep.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    21

    Default .351

    I'll never forget my first year of deer hunting and watching my grandfather shoot his .351SL Winchester. Everything about that little tank of a gun says it wouldn't be good to take whitetail in Minnesota...except in the hands my grandfather. I believe he bought it from the prison system when they phased them out. What looked like an over sized pistol round, consistently knocked down deer at over 200 yards in his hands. Not many years after he switched to an 30-.06 and now to a .243 (still hunting at 87)...but I will always remember him with that short little auto. Thankfully I still have it, just can't afford to shoot it.

  4. #4
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Shotguns; if that. Both grandpas were poor; one a sharecropper, the other a Depression Era carpenter, and the game had pretty much been shot out long before their time, anyway........

  5. #5

    Default Ithaca Model 37 16 gauge

    My Grandfather gave up Big Game Hunting after WWII. He was in the Engineers that fought Japanese on Battle of Attu. He was in a lot of heavy fighting and he also fought in the battle of the Phillipines. He hunted ducks, geese and pheasants after that in SD but he never hunted big game again.


    I am the oldest grandchild and I was named after him. He left his favorite shotgun to me after he died of cancer. He was loved and respected by all.


    Sincerely,

    Thomas

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    64

    Default

    I barely knew my Grandpa on my Dad's side. After he died, Dad inherited Grandpa's Marlin (I think) lever action, 16 ga shotgun. I tried hunting deer in Ohio with it but was never successful. Later on, my brother sold it for a fraction of what it would be worth today.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    903

    Default

    I think my gran-dad was still using bows and or spears.seeing that he grew up in Puerto Rico and pasted on before 1950 sometime.My dad never bought a gun until we moved to Alaska the 1st time in 76 and I want to say he bought a Winchester Model 70 xtr Feather weight with the Monte Carlo stock which I own today.

    2nd gun I know he got for $70 bucks and was an old single shot bolt action Stevens .22 he bought for me,and I own that one as well.Daniel

  8. #8
    Member Big Al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Palmer,Alaska
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tracer View Post
    I'll never forget my first year of deer hunting and watching my grandfather shoot his .351SL Winchester. Everything about that little tank of a gun says it wouldn't be good to take whitetail in Minnesota...except in the hands my grandfather. I believe he bought it from the prison system when they phased them out. What looked like an over sized pistol round, consistently knocked down deer at over 200 yards in his hands. Not many years after he switched to an 30-.06 and now to a .243 (still hunting at 87)...but I will always remember him with that short little auto. Thankfully I still have it, just can't afford to shoot it.
    I have made a lot of ammo for the .351 Auto loader years ago. You need a lathe with a collet attachment to hold the cases to turn the rims. You use .38 special brass. I made hundreds of cases for the .351 this way. When you make up a bunch you will want to stand on a spread out tarp to shoot them, you won't loose any brass this way. I used stout charges of 2400 powder and had a lot of fun using Lyman 358430 bullets hard cast. Made the best rabbit gun I ever owned.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  9. #9

    Default

    My father's dad was not a shooter, no guns. My mother's dad used a 16 guage double barrel shotgun, I think it was an Ithica. I used it the first couple of times I went small game hunting. My Uncle owns it now. My grandad didn't hunt deer, just rabbits, squirrels and pheasants. I think it's the only gun he ever owned.

  10. #10
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hey! If I look thru this empty beer bottle, I think I can see Russia from here!!!
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    My Fathers’ Dad was a Nebraska farmer and although deer were plentiful in his area, he was never much into hunting. In fact I never actually saw him shoot a gun. He had an old Remington 512 bolt action .22 that always stood inside the door of the machine shed that he would use to take care of garden raiding rabbits, coyotes that got too close to the chicken coop or badgers that were digging dens in the pasture. I also suspect it took care of the occasional musk rat as on several occasions he expressed his intense dislike for the little creatures. Convinced that they would tunnel thru the dams on one of the ponds, he often suggested that I (his “shooting” Grandchild) should exterminate the lot of them. I still have that old Remington and use it on a regular basis. It is by far my most prized firearm. I got it about a year after he passed on, and apparently before they had moved into town (some 12 years) he had “preserved” that rifle by pumping the entire barrel and magazine full of tractor grease before standing it back in its place in the machine shed. So when my Father handed it to me, I pulled the bolt back to make sure it was unloaded and was amazed to see those shiny little 22 cartridges trying to ooze their way thru that thick grease! Needless to say, the bore is “minty” but the rest of the rifle has not faired as well over the years.

    Grandpa Augie, my Mom’s Dad, was mostly a bird hunter and had a couple of shot guns and one or two .22’s. One of those .22’s was the Grandkid training gun, and it was an Ithica 49 falling block lever action single shot. I learned to shoot with it, and had it for about 10 years before passing it along to my Cousin so he could teach his son with it. I know for a fact that my other Cousin has the old 12 gauge pump, as I remember the day Grandma Irene gave it to him………………… Grandpa had been gone some half dozen years by that time, and my Cousin called Gran to see if he could borrow that shot gun to go pheasant hunting. She said that she got the gun case out of the closet but herd something rattling around inside, so she took the gun out and pumped the action. Unexpectedly I shot gun shell flew out the side of the action……… well Gran being Gran (truly one of the funniest people I have ever met) decided that it must now be “unloaded” as she saw the shell fly out. But to make sure, she would point it at the floor and pull the trigger…………………. Ok, before I go on, I am sure that some of you guys remember “storm windows” the old ones that you had to store in the basement and then take outside and affix to the side of the house during storm season? Yep, direct hit! Killed every **** one of them, lined up and stored nicely in the basement! I think my Cousin still has that shotgun…………………
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    448

    Default

    My Grandfather's deer rifle as a '92 Winchester in 38-40. We still have it. Not real effective but fun to shoot. My other Grandfather was a LA sharecropper and never had more than a 22. J.

  12. #12

    Unhappy Win 32-20

    My grand dad had a lever (I think 1894) in 32-20 which he and his family used for deer. He passed away before I knew him, but I used to play with it all the time. Out of about 50 grand kids, I was the only hunter, and I was first in line to inherit it, but when my Gram passed away, some of my aunts thought it would be a great idea to give it to the youngest (that made him special) grandson. Only thing was, he was a full blown, wasted drug head, and promptly sold the 32-20, along with a .45 acp and Win mod 70 270 that he inherited from his own dad, for guess what? More drugs. So no more...1894.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,957

    Default

    Paternal grandfather, none, never knew him. Maternal grandfather, who taught us all about huntings and he and his brother took us out on many rabbit hunts, had gotten rid of the few guns he had when he was younger. As we started hunting, he tried to get some back. Most were single shot shotguns. He had one he gave his brother, who gave it to his son that I could never get back, was a L.C. Smith side by side 12 gauge. Deer hunting in Ohio was shotgun only but he had a single shot 25-20 that took rim fire ammo that was great to shoot, when we could find ammo.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5

    Default Custom 30-06 w/ Simmons scope

    He still shoots like a sniper.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Between two lakes in Alaska
    Posts
    952

    Default

    My Grandfather had a 94 in .32 WS. He latter got a M70 in .270. He had a M12 in 12 for duck hunting that he loved to do...before they drained the marshes. All three of these are in my safe.

    I also have a Fox-Sterlingworth (sp?) in 12 with a broken stock. After he passed away, my Uncle told me it had belonged to his hunting buddy. He only had a few close friends (spelled FRIENDS). He was to go duck hunting with this guy and some thing came up and Granddad couldn't go. The guy took his daughter with him instead. As they were driving out in the early morning a drunk driver hit and killed them both. That's how the stock got broken.

  16. #16

    Default grandpa's guns

    growing up in Pa. the old man used a remington7600 in 30-06 for deer and a 20 gauge remington wingmaster for rabbits and grouse.

    My great granfather used a model 94 in .32 ws, it was the first gun I used for deer hunting and harvested several deer with it until I turned 16 and purchased my first gun. ( a 7600 in .270).

    I used gramaps 20 gauge wingmaster to harvest my first turkey when I was 12 also. I have all of these guns now and can't wait to share them with my children.

  17. #17
    Member OffTheRecord's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sunny Juneau
    Posts
    105

    Default .30-30

    I was fortunate enough to inherit my maternal grandfather's Savage 1895 .30-30. He bought it used after WW I. No, I do not shoot it but it is kept clean and safe.

    He was quite the avid hunter back in PA. He won a few prizes for trophy deer (stolen sadly) and even got a black bear which was rare and hard to do back in the day.

  18. #18
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    572

    Default Dad's dad

    My Mom's dad didn't shoot. But my Dad's dad sure did. I credit (and my wife blames) him for my hunting and shooting obsessions. He had several guns:

    various Remington .22s
    Remington 1100 20 ga
    Remington 760 in .270 Win
    Remington M11 in 16 ga
    Remington M788 in .223
    Colt Woodsman .22

    As you can tell, he was a Remington kind of guy. Unfortunately, most of the guns got sold off after he died. I did get two of them though: the Colt and the M788. Both still shoot great, even though the Colt has zero original finish on it.

  19. #19

    Default

    Dad's side:
    Old school '40s or '50s Sako .222 (sweet little sporter)
    Mauser '98 .257 Roberts
    Savage bolt 25-20
    Rem 700, 7rem mag

    Mom's side:
    Korean War era Savage 30-06
    Winchester 43 .218 Bee dlx version (very cool old gun)
    Ithaca 37 16ga
    Savage .243 bolt gun

  20. #20

    Default

    Rifle - 44-40
    Shotgun - Mod 12
    Revolver - 44-40
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •