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Thread: Favorite Egg Cure

  1. #1

    Default Favorite Egg Cure

    I was curing up a bunch of king roe the other day and was just curious what others have as a favorite cure? I've been using the Pro-Cure Wizard along with a bit of their bright borax. I typically put the skeines into a ziplock and pour some Wizard in and then squish it around. I then let it set up for a day or so in a cool place. Then I pull it out and let them dry on the rack for a day or two depending on how wet they look. Next I package them up in those cheap plastic rubber-made containers and either freeze them or let them sit in the fridge for the next trip. It's worked pretty good and the eggs have a great texture and durability to them. Anybody else have any secret tricks for better eggs? Thanks for sharing.

  2. #2
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    I use the pro cure to lay it out under a screen to keep the flies off let em dry for two or three days then lay them out layering paper towel / eggs / cure / eggs / cure / paper towel / eggs / cure until I fill a couple one gallon buckets then just take em out of the freezer as I need them.

  3. #3
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    My last two batches have been with Pautzkes fire cure.

    I try to go along with the directions.

    I spread the eggs out in a single layer already cut to size. Then I pour the cure over them. Then I after a few minutes I flip them and pour the cure on the other side. A few minutes later I pick up all the eggs and put them into 1 gallon bags and let them sit in the fridge for a couple days. Twice a day I swish the eggs and roll them around in the bags.

    After 3 days I took the eggs out and put borax in with the eggs poured right into the gallon bags. I put enough borax in until the eggs are all seperated into the bite sized chunks. Then I put the bags in the freezer.


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    The last batch I only used borax.

    I cut the eggs into the size I want to use then I layered them using the borax in a pan (turkey pan).

    I will leave them there for 1 to 3 days then I will put them into bags or containers (coffeee cans work well) and freeze or use them.
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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    more pics plus enough letters to be 10 characters
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  5. #5
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    I was a salt and borax guy for years, and that is still one of the most effective cures for presenting a very natural looking bait in clear water conditions.

    For colored eggs, adding raspberry Jello was all the rage in the 1970's.

    Then along came a company called ProCure, and egg curing took a quantum leap forward. These were the best looking eggs you could get with a commercial cure... just the ticket for turbid glacial flows.

    I was a devoted ProCure loyalist, right up to the time they released Wizard. Man that stuff was easily aerosolized and VERY hard on the nose... I'd have pink boogers for days afterwards! The eggs also smelled very "chemical"... almost to the point of not being eggs anymore. So I started looking for a less "chemical" cure that still gave the eggs great color.

    I discovered Amerman's cure (Oregon) in 2004. WOW! what a revelation! Eggs cured in Amemrans have been my "go to" bait ever since. Not saying I don't carry other cures when I hit the water (always good to have a variety if the fish are being finecky) but Amerman's is the one I reach for first when it's time to bait a hook.

    For my Kenai trip this year, I also got a stash of Fire Cure, and a buddy will be bringing up another proprietary cure (UEC = Ultimate Egg Cure), and another buddy has eggs cured in good ol' ProCure. With four differnt base recipes, plus an assortment of scent additives, we ought to have all the bases covered when we start bouncin' over a school of Kenai "non-biters."
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  6. #6

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    1 part salt 1 part sugar. Cut to size and generiously cover the eggs with cure during a sunny day in the mourning, half way through the day flip and cover eggs with cure again. At the end of the day I put them in throw away containers and stack them in the freezer. I've been using that recipe to cure silver, red, and king eggs for years and have caught plenty of fish with that formula. It's simple and works for me.

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