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Thread: waves over the front of hewescraft/weldcraft??

  1. #1
    Member zigzag's Avatar
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    Default waves over the front of hewescraft/weldcraft??

    I was wondering if anyone has any experience with this issue? I own a weldcraft and had some 5 ft. waves break over the front. I never really thought that it would be a concern because the water will just drain out, but the water did not drain out very fast and the next wave was breaking over the bow which made me very uneasy. The boat kept moving along but was wondering if anyone else has been in this situation and how big of water can these boats take before it is a problem?

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default

    I have a hewes. Last year I had a couple waves break over the bow. I also had it burried in a wave last year. It poped back up and the water drained pretty quick. Not the best feeling
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  3. #3
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    Default Punch more holes

    I have a Hewes, after the first time I buried the bow I punched 4 more holes in it.
    They are 3inch holes just forward of originl holes, water drains fast now.

  4. #4

    Default I try and keep the bow up as far as possible

    quarter the waves (Mixed seas are INTERESTING) ease off the throttle on the front of the wave, so as to not bury it. I have a lot of bulky light gear strapped in up there: Cooler ( lighter that the water it displaces), and 3 buoys. I need to drill more holes.
    Any suggestions will be appreciated.
    Rob

  5. #5
    Member GOT TOYS's Avatar
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    Default bow cover

    What about having a fabric cover made that snaps on? If you feel you have to run in the nasty, take it out of starage and snap it on. It will shed most of the water.

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    Member russiarulez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GOT TOYS View Post
    What about having a fabric cover made that snaps on? If you feel you have to run in the nasty, take it out of starage and snap it on. It will shed most of the water.
    I ran my buddies older hewescraft with fabric covered bow... It didn't last long in nasty stuff. The amount of water that is thrown on it when you stuff the boat into a wave is just no match for some fabric and snaps... And that was a 16 footer boat, I would imagine it be worse on a bigger boat with more open bow area to cover.

  7. #7

    Default

    I've taken one or two over the bow in some nasty seas(6-8 footers) in our aurora, but we dont have a bucket bow so it wasnt a problem. I've got a buddy with a 26 foot weldcraft, I'll have to ask him about that.

  8. #8

    Smile A bigger boat.........

    I have been running the 26' Hewes Ak. Sea Runner for 7 years. They are good boats. I am always aware that it is only a 26' boat with a 8.5 foot beam. With that in mind I always do my best to avoid seas over 4'. More holes in the front will help and going into big "head seas" at a 45 degree angle and just enough speed for steering control is about all you can do when the waves are to big for a 26' boat. Wind, tide, wave height/direction and operator skill and experience will always be a factor. I worry more about taking 2 over the stern then the bow. The first one will fill up the back and make one wish for self bailing decks with big scuppers, the second one will make you wish you had stayed home and never boated! Now if I just had me a 42' boat..................

  9. #9

    Default

    Note the big scuppers on the side of my brothers boat, two 3 inchers in the side down low on each side and two 3 inchers out the back.

    Water doesn't stick around long here.


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    Default Bucket Bows...

    I tend to agree with .338 mag....

    Once upon a time.... Years ago I was w/ a friend fishing out of Homer. It was my first summer up here and LITTLE did I know... We were in his boat a 20' Alumaweld... It had a bucket bow and a soft top. The wind and tide stacked up and made things get rough. As we cut bait and prepared to go I learned of my friend's greatest weakness... HE panics...

    As we started to motor out we had not gotten up on step so the bow was down. We took a wave over the bow. The wave crashed over the bow, splashed the windshield and rolled a portion of the soft top off.... Water flooded the boat. Stuff was hissing, steaming and popping as electrical shorts occured. At this point we were okay... but he didn't know that... He did the one thing you should never do... In a panic HE hammered down full tilt and pointed the bow straight for home....(homer) The wind and waves were hammering us and we took several more waves over the bow as he plowed through them in his panic...

    His bilge was on but I could not see that it was working. (turns out it was clogged w/ leaves). I began bailing with a bucket. The water at the back of the boat was knee deep. I don't have any idea how much water we had on board - but it was ALLOT.... He continued to plow straight into the waves aimlessly...

    I'll never forget when I heard him screaming those fateful words.... "mayday, mayday, mayday"... I began to feel as though I'd made a fatal error...

    Long story short... A dozen boats rushed to us within seconds and ultimately all the really did is get us pointed on a better course. As we began to follow them it became evident to me that our boat was safe, it was able we just needed to slow WAY down and pick a better course. The bilge and my bailing eventually caught up and we quietly, respectfully and with some embarrasment pulled into harbor. I've never fished with him again...

    Over the years I relfect back and after taking USCG courses and spending a fair amount of time with seasoned skippers I've learned of all the errors, mistakes and "inappropriateness" of what happened that day.

    I run a 20' Hewes Sea Runner. I've found that the correct trim, speed and chosen course can nearly eliminate the concern of taking water over the bow. I've seen some pretty big water south of Flat Island (Homer). It was not comfortable and frazzled the nerves but sometimes the SAFEST way between two points is NOT a STRAIGHT line...

    The only time I've ever really gotten scarred was following waves... We had waves building behind us and my 115 Yamaha was doing all she could to get us out of the trough... We never took one "up the rear" but looking over my shoulder and seeing them coming our way sure scarred the hell out of me... It's the only time I've ever rehearsed a call for help, thought about my position, my survival suits and how stupid I felt for staying out longer than we should have...


    The other suggestions of filling the bow area with gear is not a bad one. I have an inflatable tube that is just he right size triangle. It's a canvas covered tube like you pull behind a boat. I discussed the possibility of having it in the boat (deflated) just for the occassion that we thought it might help "take up space". I think it would work but I'm not convinced it's the "best" option...

    One additional thought... Most "bucket bow" boats have some type of Anchor hold and/or live well up front... It's CRITICAL that these stay closed and latched. Don't get lazy. If one of those bounces open and you take a wave you've just compounded the problem.

    Anyway, It's good to be thinking about this stuff...

  11. #11

    Default WinMag:Very well stated

    I was thinking of an inflatable filler for the bow myself. Something that was strapped in and would displace water and not float out.
    I am considering adding scuppers with one way valves to the back and front of my Ocean Pro.
    I am not even sure who makes such a thing, but I think it would make my boat more sea worthy.
    Rob

  12. #12
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Default Well said Win Mag!

    Most boats will take way more than the person behind the wheel and the throttles. I ran 24 foot Searunner for 5 seasons and had it in some pretty rough stuff out in the Sound. I never actually "stuffed" the bow, but have had waves break over the bow. The scuppers on the year 2000 model seemed to be bigger than what they are now. I may be mistaken though.

    I never really worried too much about taking one over the stern, but I felt that I could power out of it. You can never have too much power IMO. I see a lot of hewescraft out there that are under powered. I believe that dealers put together packages with the bare minimum horsepower to make the package look more attractive dollar wise. How many 22 foot HT searunners do you see with an F115 on the back?

    One other thing that bothers me about the hewes, weldcraft, aluma weld type boats is the rubber gasket windows. Take an 8 footer over the bow into the window and you have a window in your lap, a cabin/cockpit full of water, and no self bailing deck. Pair this with too little horsepower and you are not going to be able to keep the bow up. I had a friend that had this happen on a 26 foot hewes. Not fun.

    The Hewes and Weldcraft boats are an economical way to go and can be quite comfortable. They get a lot of families on the water. If the person behind the wheel keeps their cool or better yet, heads back to safe harbor before it hits the fan they will be fine. Happy boating!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  13. #13
    Member Ridgerat's Avatar
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    Default

    Good story WinMag...thanks for sharing.

  14. #14
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Most boats can take an incredible amount of water, in capable hands. The most capable of boats can get in plenty of trouble in the wrong hands.

    The hardest I've ever been pitched in a boat was a 43' delta out of Homer. The seas weren't that big for a boat that size, but put it perpendicular to the waves and hold on.

    I will say I'm considering opening up the drains in my anchor deck. I've yet to hear of a tolman taking signifigant water over the bow, but if the deck is self draining, it might as well drain right quick. I'm also debating adding additional scuppers to the transom. Better safe than sorry.

  15. #15

    Default Rubber Window gaskets are also a concern

    I know that they will pop if hit with green water.

  16. #16
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default You could

    always find a cove and wait out the bad weather, drink adult beverages and cook some dawgs!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  17. #17

    Default

    I have had a couple waves come over the bow of my little 16' Sea Runner. Lucky that I had the canvas bow cover snapped down with a basket of anchor line, anchor, and large a bouy under it. It was just the right size to help hold the canvas cover in place and the water displaced very quickly and absolutly no water came in. This was on my very first day out on the salt! We headed directly back to port as it was a bit too rough for a small boat. Later my wife named our boat. The Shouldn't Otter... Shouldn't Otter got out in rought water, Shouldn't Otter be the last one in, Shouldn't Otter be the first one out... Shouldn't Otter be STUPID on the water. Mother Nature will take you out quicker then a blink if you try her... There are some great stories on this thread that we can all learn from. Thanks

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by leahy View Post
    I am considering adding scuppers with one way valves to the back and front of my Ocean Pro.
    I am not even sure who makes such a thing, but I think it would make my boat more sea worthy.
    Rob

    Two ways to do the scuppers if you're worried about being too close to the waterline, one is to put innertube on the scupper hole that protrudes outside the boat an inch or so. This would allow for the water to slowly drain out but not really come back in fast enough to worry about stepping in the corner of your boat for instance. I wouldn't recommend this, although it may work, it'll drive you nuts.... been there. Instead, I would opt for the OMC check-ball style. They work very well, prevent the incoming water from getting your feet wet when everyone stands on one side of the boat yet drains quite quickly.

    Here's a link to the OMC part and I attached the pic since it was small:
    http://www.midwest-marine.com/Mercha...ory_Code=bilge
    Attached Images Attached Images

  19. #19

    Default Thanks For The Link

    THAT LED ME TO WHAT I AM LOOKING FOR.
    Rob

  20. #20

    Default bucket bows

    that's one of my big reasons for liking the style and build of the pacific cruiser/sport i like the look of that raised cuddy for shedding water off the bow if it happens just hope that big hatch is made of poly carbonite plastic and not just cheap plexiglas , wouldn't want a wave to punch that thing in or you'll get a lap full of water . also belive having enough HP to stay on top would help if your battling weight ,wind and tide

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