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Thread: A Fine Alaskan Bullet....

  1. #1
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    Default A Fine Alaskan Bullet....

    I mailed a check off this morning to Alaska Bullet Works. No big deal, I've done that before but what is a big deal is the way Karl and Mike at Alaska bullet works do business. I call and order a quantity of their fine Kodiak bonded bullets and they arrive a few days later with an invoice, then I mail them a check. There are three things about this deal that I like.

    I like knowing that part of the cost of these bullets isn't going to some banking conglomerate in who knows what country in the form of credit card fees.

    I like that we still have home town folks around that will do business with a hand shake and will take a mans' word as his bond?

    And I like that we can still buy these well made, hand crafted bullets from a small home owned business, right here in Alaska.

    I got a few boxes of their 300 grain RN bullets for the 405 Winchester. These lovely bullets will work fine in my new Close Quarters Bear gun and will leave the 21" barrel at about 2500 fps. I also have an order standing for the 330 grains of the same .412" diameter for this rifle which should hit the 2400 fps mark.

    This bullet diameter, which I once thought to be hard to find, is very much alive and well and many different makers support it. Swift has their 350 and 400 A-frame bondeds. Hawk has many different jacket thicknesses in the 300, 325, 350 and 400 grain weights. Woodleigh of Austrailia has 350 and 400 grainers and Hornady has the 300 in FP and Spitzer and the 400 heavy game bullet for the 405/400 N.E. 3". And of course these 300 and 330 grain Kodiak bonded bullets. I find my self with a small collection of 40 caliber rifles and it's good to know I'll be able to feed them.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  2. #2
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    Murphy,
    Can you give me the contact info for this company?

    Thanks

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskadude View Post
    Murphy,
    Can you give me the contact info for this company?

    Thanks
    Murphy will provide more details I'm sure, but when I clicked my old link to their site, it came up dead.

    I googled ABW and came up with this:

    Alaska Bullet Works Inc (Kodiak Bonded Core Bulletts)
    Is This Your Company?

    9978 Crazy Horse Dr, Juneau, AK 99801-8527, United States (Map)

    Phone: (907) 789-3834

    Also Does Business As:Kodiak Bonded Core Bulletts; Kodiak Bullets

    SIC:Sporting and Athletic Goods, NEC

    Line of Business:Mft Big Game Hunting Bullet

  4. #4
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    I have had the pleasure with talking with the fella a couple of time in 2 past orders and yes it is the original style of doing business. A mans word is all that he owns, if it ain't good neither is he.

    Thanks for bringing that up Murphy, it is a good thing-will have to order from him again soon.

    regards,

  5. #5

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    Sir Murphy,

    Do you know where the Swift and Hawk bullets can be found? I've searched and have not be lucky enough to stumble across the info on the web....




    [/quote]I got a few boxes of their 300 grain RN bullets for the 405 Winchester. These lovely bullets will work fine in my new Close Quarters Bear gun and will leave the 21" barrel at about 2500 fps. I also have an order standing for the 330 grains of the same .412" diameter for this rifle which should hit the 2400 fps mark.

    This bullet diameter, which I once thought to be hard to find, is very much alive and well and many different makers support it. Swift has their 350 and 400 A-frame bondeds. Hawk has many different jacket thicknesses in the 300, 325, 350 and 400 grain weights. Woodleigh of Austrailia has 350 and 400 grainers and Hornady has the 300 in FP and Spitzer and the 400 heavy game bullet for the 405/400 N.E. 3". And of course these 300 and 330 grain Kodiak bonded bullets. I find my self with a small collection of 40 caliber rifles and it's good to know I'll be able to feed them.[/quote]

  6. #6

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    I'm not Murphy, but here ya go:

    Hawk Bullets

    The link I have for Swift bullets is dead. Couldn't find a replacement either.

  7. #7

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    Thanks for the linkage info!

  8. #8
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    Here's the link to Swift and their phone is 785-754-3959.

    Just call and order (get on the list for) their .411" bullets. They make a run of them about once a year in 350 and 400 grain and you must get them while their hot.

    www.swiftbullets.com
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  9. #9
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    How'd these bullets perform on game? What's your experience there? That's what I'm interested in.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    How'd these bullets perform on game? What's your experience there? That's what I'm interested in.

    I find that an almost odd question!?

    Here is a short list of animals, calibers and bullet weights over the years. I will just list the Kodiak and A-frames and omit the partitions, and other such bullets I've used a lot. I have very limited experience with the Hawk bullets but enough to comment about thier performance.

    Kodiak
    W/T and mule deer about a dozen and a half. 308, 150 grain, 165 grain; 30-06, 165 grain, 180 grain. 7x57 Mauser 150 grain. 308 Norma 180 grain (two).
    Various african antelope and zebra mostly from 30-06 or 338 mag, some with 375, 300 grain. The 338 with 250's is enough to get a full 3/4" mushroon at 200 yards and most were recovered at about 80-85%. The 30-06 is perfect for this bullet at 180 grains and is equal to the partition
    in field performance, all exits at about 200 yards and beyond on medium sized animals (hartebeast, wildebeast, lechwe, and Nyala). I have a recovered bullet in 338 from an up close waterbuck (700 pounds) that is over 1" across and weighs about 200 grains (was 250).
    With the 338 mag weight retention was about 80% with the others that were recovered about 90%, they have a tnedency to exit from slower rifles. The 375 with 300 Kodiaks was used for two african lionesses with two shots each the only exit was a crossing, high double lung shot and made an inch and a half hole in the hide. The others were recovered at about 3/4" to 1" expansion and all above 250 grains. Absolutely devastating destruction from a 375 with a 300 grain Kodiak on lions in the 300 to 400 pound class. Enough gun!

    Swift Aframe. I have taken more big animals with this bullet in larger calibers than any other bullet. Recovery is rare. I'll talk about the recovered bullets.

    338, 250 grain Moose. (two) 220ish grains about 3/4" diameter or more.
    338, 225 grain Elk . 190ish grains flattened out on the right knee joint from the left front shoulder shot. Penetration; about 55" of elk.
    375 (improved), 270 grain, Kudu 350ish yards. Perfect mushroom with the base bulged in typical A-frame fashion, about 275 grains.
    338, 250 grain, Zebra. Cut out of the brisket muscles after a stern shot on the run at about 200 yards. Bullet entered right ham, (missed bone)
    went through the paunch and chest (heart shot) and lodged in the brisket, about 200 grains.

    I have used many smaller calibers (less than 30) on deer with exits.
    I have several african species with 7mm, 30 cal, 338, and 375 with exits.

    I have a recovered 300 grain 375 caliber form a zebra taken at a little over 400 yards (wounded) that weighs about 295 grains and is expanded to about 1/2" inch.

    The various 416 calibers with the larger, tougher animals such as cape buffalo will exit unless there is a double shouder shot. They make large gaping holes and blow buffalo clockworks out on the long grass. The 300 grain 375 H&H usually will not exit except crossing lung shots. They will weigh about 250 grains at up to 3/4" expansion.


    Kodiaks: About the equal of the partition caliber for caliber. They are best when used in standard velocity rifles about 2800 fps. They are comparable to woodleigh, maybe not quite as tough in the jacket.

    Hawks: These bullets are soft. The soft lead and annealled soft copper jackets expand together and stay to gether. They should not be driven too fast. They are some of the best bullet available for the older, slower velocity rounds such as the 348 Win, 405 Win, 8x57 mauser, 9.3x62. The will expand like no other bullet and yet still have the core wrapped around the jacket, inside out.

    A-Frames: These are tough bullets. They withstand high velocity impact and tough animals. It would be an excellent choice for the above 2800 fps calibers or standard calibers with very tough customers waiting. They produce many exits from standard velocity calibers. When trying to stretch a marginal caliber for the tough guys they would work well. Such as the 375 for cape buffalo, or the 30-06 for moose, eland or zebra.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  11. #11

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    Murphy...

    I contacted Swift and put my name on the list via email. Do you have an idea what time of year they make this special run of .411 bullets?

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Hawks: These bullets are soft. The soft lead and annealled soft copper jackets expand together and stay to gether. They should not be driven too fast. They are some of the best bullet available for the older, slower velocity rounds such as the 348 Win, 405 Win, 8x57 mauser, 9.3x62. The will expand like no other bullet and yet still have the core wrapped around the jacket, inside out.
    That's been my experience with them, too. I've never pushed them faster than 2400fps, but for such good expansion and weight retension at lower velocities, something would have to give as you move further up the velocity scale. In fact, they expand so well I kind of wonder about penetration if you are shooting light-for-caliber bullets. Weigh that against excellent controlled expansion at low velocities I guess. They're my pick when I want expansion using guns that thrive on moderate velocities and heavy bullets.

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