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Thread: What kind of meat wagon?

  1. #1
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    Default What kind of meat wagon?

    I am new to this whole ATV thing and I am wondering what kind of meat wagons do most guys use or at least what characteristics to look for. I saw one at Fred Meyers for around 380.00 but it didn't look like it had good ground clearance. Any advice?

  2. #2

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    First and most importantly in my opinion is it must be able to keep water off my gear, second it should not be any wider than your machine, and lastly it should have sufficient ground clearance. I also like mine to have places where I can put spare gas and have rails or some way to last stuff to the top without it falling off but these are just personal preferences.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default Also....

    full size (width) ATV tires. You want the trailer to be able to float like the wheeler will. Nothing will get you stuck faster than a bottomed out, loaded trailer dragging through a mud hole! If you have any experience at welding, I would recommend building your own. They are simple to build and you can do it for less than that $389 POJ at Freddies.

    Steel - easy to work with, much cheaper than aluminum but heavier.

    Aluminum - not as many folks can weld it (or are set up to), expensive and a little lighter (not as durable) than steel.

    My trailer is a steel frame with 1/2" plywood box. Box dimensions are 2'x2'x4'. It isn't as big as a lot of trailers, but then I don't have to worry about overloading it as much. Low center of gravity is VERY important as well.
    AKmud
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  4. #4

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    The Pac Rat from Plaschem in Anchorage sets the standard. You can also fit it with ski's in winter.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default $$$$

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres
    The Pac Rat from Plaschem in Anchorage sets the standard. You can also fit it with ski's in winter.
    Also sets the bar for price though....what are they going for now? $1,800?
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Default

    I prefer having the tires outside the main box to give the trailer more stability. Discovered through trail and error the wider the stance the less prone to tipping. I also perfer the tire stance be wider than my ATV's. Having a wider stance permits the trailer to run a little higher and not sink in the same tire ruts caused by my ATV in the mud bogs. Using 25 inch tires instead of 22's gives the trailer another 1 1/2 in of ground clearance and increases the load carrying capacity.
    When loading the trailer it is very important to load the heavy items first.

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Trailer

    For mine I used 1 1/2" steel angle for the frame, 2" sq. tube stock for the axle and tongue. 5/8" pressure treated for the sides bolted to a 1" angle iron frame.

    I bought the wheels, bearing and hitch from Trailer Craft in Anchorage. The wheels width is the same as the Honda's and the box ended up being 4' long, 28" wide and 32" high so that I could get three pieces out of a 8' sheet.

    So far it is great. I cut my own firewood and can fill it with wet spruce with no problems. I will try to post a picture tomorrow if anyone wants me too. I siliconed the plywood before bolting so it is waterproff all around except the rear that I have not put a piece on yet.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Default

    I saw the trailer at Fred's today. I don't think it was built all that bad but those kind of trailers are usually better for hauling stuff around the yard. I have built many trailers and prefer to build them a little sturdier. I lost my trailer while hill climbing and it rolled to the bottom, you would never know this happened after the fact. Tip-overs are common with trailers that are to tall or aren't wide enough and can be a real pain. The last trailer I built cost between $200-250. I also like to bend a piece of rebarr to place in front of the tires so they are less likely to hook on a tree or rock. If you are able or know anyone that has the tools, it can be a fun project to build. I would love to have a PacRat trailer but for the money I wouldn't want to use it and scratch it up, lol.

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    I posted this on a previous thread and added a few more things if it helps you:
    I am own my third design in the last 17 years. The perfect trailer would be all aluminum and the bed would be 48 inches long and 30 wide. The tongue would be 3 feet long as I find a longer tongue makes it easier to make extreme uphill or down hill departures and it also helps when trying to back up.
    When I had my last trailer built I was unable to afford one of all aluminum so this is how it was built:
    Size of the bed is 48 by 30 and the box is also 30 inches tall. The frame is square tubing steel and is reinforced at all corners. I had the frame designed so the box is removeable from it so I can use the trailer as a flat bed. On the corners on the frame I had my builder weld a 8 in piece of angle iron going up. These pieces hold a small piece of 2x4 that will slide in and convert it to a flat bed with ease. The wheels (25in tires) are designed so they sit on the outside of the bed to keep the center of mass center and as low as possible. I know you see a lot of trailers out there with the wheels close together and part of the bed on top of them but in my experience this is a invitation to flip your trailer the first time you side hill. Been there and done that, thank you.
    In front of the tires I had a piece of metal welded to the frame at a 45 degree angle. These pieces help deflect trees and bushes from getting caught in the axles. The box is made of aluminum. I am guessing the total weight of the empty trailer is about 140 pounds. I believe I paid $900 to have the trailer built and that was about 2 years ago. Using an aluminum frame would of upped the price considerably. Wished now I would of done it.
    As always, everyone has a differnet opinion as to the best design. Pick out what you think are good points from everyone and have one made up the way you want it.
    This is one case where you absolutely want to "over build"

  10. #10
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    Default

    This one works pretty good. I bought the trailer but you could make one.100gal rubbermaid tub on a 2 inch frame. Throw a tarp over it, wrap a ratchet strap around it and it's waterproof. I made a swivel hitch for it so that if/when I roll it it won't break anything. Takes a lot to roll it though.
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  11. #11
    Member GOT TOYS's Avatar
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    Default Trailer

    Get a 6-wheeler. The box is high and dry, can pack a moose or 3 caribou, and come home clean. Dragging a trailer is like dragging an anchor when going through bogs.
    Kingfisher 2525. 225, 20, and 2hp Hondas.

  12. #12

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    LOL.......that all depends on what your driving!

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Talking Forget the trailer!

    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Default

    Snyd,
    Could you post some photos of your swivel hitch and some details about the installation? I am interested in adding that to my wagons.
    Thank you

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Snyd,
    I don't think you have a bad design there, but it appears to be a little deceiving. I seriously don't think you would tip it that far when its full of gear or meat without flipping it?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBighorn
    Snyd,
    I don't think you have a bad design there, but it appears to be a little deceiving. I seriously don't think you would tip it that far when its full of gear or meat without flipping it?
    Ya, I know what you're saying. This is just one pic in a series that I took after making the swivel hitch to show that if the trailer is going over there is no stress on the ATV hitch or ball hitch on the trailer tounge. It also shows the bottom of the trailer if someone wnats to make one. However, I will say this, with all the 2 inch metal down low on that trailer it sticks to the ground pretty good. If you get it top heavy and in the wrong situation it can go over but I've never had a problem. I cut the quarters off my moose, bag em. Bag the backstraps, rib meat and neck meat etc. I can get a lot of weight down low. Not an issue with caribou. Just throw em in.

    I do wish the frame was a little wider and that I had the 150 gal tub though.

    Quote Originally Posted by gottoys
    Dragging a trailer is like dragging an anchor when going through bogs.
    You just need good tires, a quad with some power and diff lock. I have drug this thing laoded heavy through mud holes that I know a stock quad or even stock 6 wheeler alone would get stuck in.

    Quote Originally Posted by SnowWolfe
    Could you post some photos of your swivel hitch and some details about the installation? I am interested in adding that to my wagons.
    Here you go. It's a pipe union, a chunk of pipe cut in half, some bb's for bearings, some grease and a couple set screws. About 10 bucks. I have used it a couple years on some rough terrain. Still holding up.

    http://homepage.mac.com/perryschneider/PhotoAlbum7.html
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  17. #17

    Default wolverine trailer for tundra

    three of these are being sent to the northwest arctic this weekend. several are out in the bethel area as well. they will float a 300# load. i have been wanting one of these for a while.

    Larry, the builder, is easy to work with and will make mods upon request. yes the pacrat is nice, but it is also expensive and heavy (300#).

    the wolverine trailer is only 165# and still has the walking bar so the wheels move, not the load. worth a look see for folks.

    fyi, larry is sending four posts so i can attach 12 inch tall plywood around the top of the box so the trailer will be twice as deep. check them out at this link:

    http://www.huntsinc.com/wolverine/default.asp

    forty below

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