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Thread: Passing in Ester Passage

  1. #1

    Default Passing in Ester Passage

    Question for all of you boaters. On Saturday we were running through Ester Passage-going about 26mph with a boat full of friends from outside-just showing them the sights. We came up behind one of the tour boats and we passed them off thier starboard with about 40 yards between us. They were going about 10-15mph. After we passed them the skipper hailed me and requested that I let him know when I came up behind him. He was very civil as was I but afterwards I was thinking-I've gone throught that and other passages many times and I've yet to have anyone hail me when passing and I've never hailed anyone else. My thinking is that as long as I'm far enough away from the boat I'm passing I shouldn't be calling out to every boat I pass.

    On any Sunday afternoon in July or August hailing everyone that one passed would result in CH 16 being overrun with folks passing each other in Passage Canal and elsewhere. I took the USCG safety class and although the recommended is to hail there are practical considerations too. Any thoughts????
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

  2. #2

    Default From: Rules of the Road

    http://www.boatingbasicsonline.com/c...ing/6_2_b1.php
    http://www.dnr.state.ak.us/parks/boating/
    he was correct in asking for contact!
    Overtaking
    When two vessels are moving in the same direction, and the astern vessel wishes to pass, it must initiate the signal to pass as shown in the diagram. The vessel passing is the give-way vessel and should keep out of the way of the vessel being passed. The vessel being passed is the stand-on vessel and must maintain its course and speed. If the stand-on vessel realizes that the course intended by the give-way vessel is not safe, it should sound the danger or doubt signal.
    A vessel is deemed to be overtaking when the vessel is approaching the vessel ahead in a direction of 22.5 degrees abaft her beam. At night you would only be able to see the stern light of the vessel being overtaken. You would not be able to see either sidelight.
    Inland Rules
    "I intend to pass you on your port side"
    2 short blasts (1 sec.)

    "Agreement"
    2 short blasts (1 sec.)

    International Rules:
    "I intend to pass you on your port side"
    2 prolonged blasts/2 short

    "Agreement"
    1 prolonged/1 short/1 prolonged/1 short


    Inland Rules
    "I intend to pass you on your starboard side"
    1 short blast (1 sec.)

    "Agreement"
    1 short blast (1 sec.)

    International Rules:
    "I intend to pass you on your starboard side"
    2 prolonged blasts/1 short

    "Agreement"
    1 prolonged/1 short/1 prolonged/1 short


  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskapiranha View Post
    http://www.boatingbasicsonline.com/c...ing/6_2_b1.php
    http://www.dnr.state.ak.us/parks/boating/
    he was correct in asking for contact!
    Overtaking
    When two vessels are moving in the same direction, and the astern vessel wishes to pass, it must initiate the signal to pass as shown in the diagram. The vessel passing is the give-way vessel and should keep out of the way of the vessel being passed. The vessel being passed is the stand-on vessel and must maintain its course and speed. If the stand-on vessel realizes that the course intended by the give-way vessel is not safe, it should sound the danger or doubt signal.
    A vessel is deemed to be overtaking when the vessel is approaching the vessel ahead in a direction of 22.5 degrees abaft her beam. At night you would only be able to see the stern light of the vessel being overtaken. You would not be able to see either sidelight.
    Inland Rules
    "I intend to pass you on your port side"
    2 short blasts (1 sec.)

    "Agreement"
    2 short blasts (1 sec.)

    International Rules:
    "I intend to pass you on your port side"
    2 prolonged blasts/2 short

    "Agreement"
    1 prolonged/1 short/1 prolonged/1 short


    Inland Rules
    "I intend to pass you on your starboard side"
    1 short blast (1 sec.)

    "Agreement"
    1 short blast (1 sec.)

    International Rules:
    "I intend to pass you on your starboard side"
    2 prolonged blasts/1 short

    "Agreement"
    1 prolonged/1 short/1 prolonged/1 short


    Not arguing that this is a rule, but from 15 years of boating experience and watching what others do, this is rarely the case. Most the time one just goes around. Although I will say, hailing is a good idea. I was chugging along in the Narrows following another boat by Pillow Rock three weeks or so ago in about 10-12 foot rollers (the other boat was disappearing in front of me) in my CD-22 and a 26 foot Guide Stickers Osprey came flying by and gave me a nice 3-4 foot tightly spaced wake to content with in addition to the waves. I doubt know if it really was dangerous, but I had a couple of minutes of pucker factor while heading out. The boat was very hard to control in the confused mess he made. Strangely, and gladly, after cruising around the Cape, it mellowed out in front of Day Harbor and the seas were only 3 feet or so as we were strongly considering heading back. Clearly, in this case, this is why this rule can be an important one.

  4. #4

    Default

    The rules are the rules but one must also use good judgement and just because you are following the rules other boats might not or don't know them. Although you may be the stand on vessel the other boat may not know the rules and you must give way. You may have the stand on position to a large cruise ship but since you are smaller and more maneuverable you need to give way.

    I think in this situation since it may be difficult for the tour boat captain to see the smaller boat it would be prudent to hail the captain. This way the tour boat captain knows your location even though he may not see you and keep from altering his course in your direction. I agree that hailing every boat when overtaking would result in crowding channel 16.

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    It depends on the situation. Putting yourself in the position of the cruise ship captain, what if he had to change course due to some debri in the water, and it hadn't seen you coming?

    If you're in a narrow area, it seems prudent to hail the vessel before passing. 40 yds isn't that all far off. I'm assuming it hadn't seen you coming or at least considered your pass as fairly close to him, and hence the friendly reminder.

  6. #6

    Default Passing

    Good points. When it comes to the rules there is also the following:
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

  7. #7

    Default Passing

    The rule that I was attempting to post was the "head on" rule. In over 25 years of boating I've never heard anyone sound the one or two blast when meeting. But looking back I can see where the skipper of the tour boat might have been surprised at my passing-in the future I'll err on the side of caution. Thanks
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

  8. #8

    Default Safety is the prime Object

    He has the total safety of the vessal and the people who are depending on him. The point is, what if he was to see a overturned boat with people in the water and on top of it. Some one passing without him happening to see them, turn hard a port, bang there you are.
    Just because no one does it does not in any way take away from the fact is one of the "Rules of the Road". When said no one does it, well every tour boat, Ferry, tanker or cargo ship does it. When the two USCG ships where in Whittier EVERY ship that left port haled and announced there intent to pass by. And the USCG was both anchored up.
    I posted the rule! to help understand the rules but good to see an argument

  9. #9

    Default passing

    There needs to be some common sense too. If you are passing and are 1/4 mile away do you need to hail the boat you are passing? I don't think so. If you look at the picture, I think they are meaning boats that are in close proximety of each other.

  10. #10
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default Bottom Line

    Always error on the side of safety! Or you could end up in the water like the folks did a few weeks ago in Passage Canal.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  11. #11

    Default

    Then again, some folks just like to control everything around them. Should of told him you sounded one short blast, and he failed to post a watch and reply.

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