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Thread: .284 wildcat

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    Default .284 wildcat

    I have had my MkII .308 barreled action resting up for a yr. now awaiting a new stock, why not wait for a barrel if........I opt for the .375-.284? Does not seem to be much info or personal use in this caliber. A cailber of this choice indeed would be for me a in close rifle and thinks that a c&c bullet of any maker would suffice ie....Speer, Horndaddy or.....velocities couldn't be that high end.

    Where's my buddy Murph? Anyone here in our fabulous state done such an animal? Any pros or cons on the matter? Village life allows lots of load development and am now pretty much up to speed-think that entitles me to another.

    am waiting-thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grizz106 View Post
    I have had my MkII .308 barreled action resting up for a yr. now awaiting a new stock, why not wait for a barrel if........I opt for the .375-.284? Does not seem to be much info or personal use in this caliber. A cailber of this choice indeed would be for me a in close rifle and thinks that a c&c bullet of any maker would suffice ie....Speer, Horndaddy or.....velocities couldn't be that high end.

    Where's my buddy Murph? Anyone here in our fabulous state done such an animal? Any pros or cons on the matter? Village life allows lots of load development and am now pretty much up to speed-think that entitles me to another.

    am waiting-thanks.
    The only possible objection you could have to this ctg. would be how deep are your pockets?

    Reamer, dies all come at a price. Good barrel blank at 300.00 reamer at close to 200.00, head space gage @ 50.00. Cost of install by a good smith 200.00. Dies at near 200.00 plus (that's if you know the best way to go and don't buy a resize reamer).

    For the guy in your area your you, with a personnel gold mine, it's not an issue.

    I like the .284 for what it is, I like the .375 H&H for what it is. If it was my barreled action, I would do it up in the 6.5/.284. But that just me, no accounting for taste.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post

    I like the .284 for what it is, I like the .375 H&H for what it is. If it was my barreled action, I would do it up in the 6.5/.284. But that just me, no accounting for taste.
    Big Al, I can relate to them ideas-no problem there. There is this nagging potential of the .375-284, for my wife that is in that little action. Berries and bears is her karma it seems, not with me I have to hunt them to see them. I have lots of rifles built up for her to use but...she has that affair with her Win. 94 .30-30AI.

    Perhaps in the end this particular little action will find favor in her hands-she loves to hunt moose.

    I will continue with my search.

    regards,

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    I recall an article quite a few years ago (memory sezz it was in the late 70's-early 80's time frame in Gun Digest Annual or a similar large volume) on making a 375-284 for a Savage 99. It peaked my interest, because at the time I had two 99's in 284, which seemed a little redundant. If you can live with the short OAL and deep seating required by such a short action, the round makes a whole lot of sense in such a handy rifle. I never got around to buliding one, but I'm guessing there is at least one set of reamers floating around if you can find it, and probably more. I've heard of other folks doing it for bolts in standard length actions to get longer seating and better case capacity, also to overcome some of the shoulder issues with the 375 Whelen.

    I just did a pretty thorough search of my library and can't come up with any of those sources at the moment, indicating more about the current status of my library than any real lack of info.

    If I got serious about such a project, as a first step I'd place a call to RCBS and to Clymer reamers to see what info they have. I'd have trouble picking between a 375 and 358 version for a short action gun, though.

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    Type in ".375-284 rifle cartridge" on your homepage search engine. All kinds of GOOD stuff!

    til later

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    Brown Bear, I too would have difficulty in the two afore mentioned calibers as well. One would probably duplicate the .35 Whel and the other closer to the Steyr. Going to a standard action would defeat my task as I would probably opt for the .375 Ruger. The 9.3x64 project is still in the makings and along my 9.3x62 would fill the .375 Ruger requirements or thereabouts. The .375-.284 is justified as I have many left over .375 bullets left from my .375 RUM affair a few yrs. back.

    I figure if I have the bullets I may as well build a .375 caliber who says life has got to make sense. ha

    300 S&W I will type them in and see-mahsii'

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    Lots of bullets on hand is a very good reason Griz!

    If they start running short, have a look at the Hornady 220 grain FN. I've used it quite a bit in reduced 375 H&H loads at 2300-2600 fps, and it's a real deer swatter. At lower velocities in the 38-55 and 38-56, and in the 375 Winchester at near 2300, it's also dandy. I wouldn't hesitate to use in on elk and moose within trajectory/sighting limits either. It's a terrific hunting bullet.

    It also strikes me that with the flat nose and shorter length, it might be a real nice way to meet short OAL limits in your action while still having ample powder capacity.

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    If someone were to ask me, "which ctg would give me the best results using cast bullets for hunting"? I would have to say of the more modern day type of ctg, the .375 in the H&H chambering. The .375 H&H is my all time favorite chambering. It's easy to load for, usually accurate and works with a lot of different loadings. Last but not least, it just works.

    If I wanted a shorter action hard hitting rifle, I would go to the .358 WINCHESTER. You don't have to reinvent the wheel.

    I like wildcats, just remember, when it comes to selling a wildcat, you have really limited your market.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Default Catting around with the 284....

    What a lovely case to start necking. I've made it into a .243, .257, .263 (6.5), .308 and a .338. I've not made the 358 or the 375. Some say that it could go to .416 but I would stop at 375.

    IT is .500" at the base and tapers to .475" at the shoulder. It ha s very strong 35 degree shoulder and is a strong case by design. It will fit into the 99 Savage, the 88 Winchester and of course all the many bolt actions. I would prefer anything of .284 inch and up to be made on a long (30-06) action so bullets could be seated so as not to encroach on powder space. It has a very well designed neck/shoulder dimension with exactly .2846" of neck at trim length. With it's 35 degree shoulder that will grow proportionally as it is necked up. This is a good thing and will allow us to keep the same headspace dimension, saving money on gages. Dave Manson can whip out a reamer for $195. with a floating/replaceble pilot. Fixed pilots are a little less. $165 I think.

    The down side of this is the .027" rebated case rim. This has been enough to cause some feeding grief with some push feeder actions. The bolt can miss the head then jump over the body becasue of the tapered base. I have made these on Sako actions and Mausers and had no problems. The M700 is where I've seen some problems but they are easily remedied by relieving the rails to allow the cartridge to sit higher in the magazine. A controlled feed claw extractor woudn't likely have problems with it.

    This is similar to the 376 Steyr. This base dimension and this capacity is similar and the 376 case is a bit better design to work with for feeding and capacity in a 30-06 length action. The Steyr has a rim rebated only .006" and that can be ignored. Your design would give 2400 fps to a 260 grain partition. It would also respond better to down loading with the 220 Hornady or the fine old 235 grain Speer, an excellent bullet for general duty and it is inexpensive. The myriad of 250 grainers as well as the 260 partition and the 270 round nose Hornady or 270 protected point Kodiak would be good heavy game/bruin bullets. Premium bullets won't really be needed at the velocity of the 375/284. The cartridge would be an improvement over the 375-06 because of the more substantial shoulder. Never a headspace care. We don't really have anything in this category. No 38 caliber, 250 grain, moderate velocity, low recoil with enough bullet weight and girth to hit with authority. I think it has always been needed. Enough velocity to reach out to 200 yards or so and enough bullet weight to hit very hard in close.

    Just to muddy the water a little I will mention an upcoming event that may change your plans a little. The 375 Ruger case is .532" diameter at the base, and....no I'm not suggesting this is the one for you! But wait, there's still more. There is a comin' a Ruger RCM......Oh, I know it is just a 300 and a 338 caliber but......it is 2.0" long and is .532" diameter body. I've jumped the gun a little and I'm having a reamer made for a new bore size on this case, to be unvielled at a later date.....But it is going to be available as to be coming out of the wood work. This new short fat cartridge is likely the best design of all of them to date...not so fat to limit magazine capacity yet enough capacity to be the equal of the 30-06 Ackley improved and then some. Actually it is the exact duplicate of my 376 Steyr improved case. I don't know what this RCM will look like so I'm anticipating that it will be appx 2.0" long and I just gave it the neck that I wanted it to have and this may require setting the shoulder back on RCM brass but no real task and I will have 30 degree shoulder as I guess that the RCM will have. All I need is some brass to work with. I have some Hornady brass on order and Redding dies as well as standard 300 and 338 RCM dies. This would take to a Mauser action like ducks to water and though it could not be down loaded to equal the deer rifle performance of the 375/284 it could be throttled down below the 375 WSM ballistics. Sort of between the 375 Whelen and the 375 WSM. Yours would be a 375 Whelen with a better case. Keep us posted on your project.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Muddy Waters and Ruger Compact Magnums---best do something soon.ha. I been doing some homework on this idea of mine and came across the RCM's too. I've a bit of time and am certain I will have something concrete. The dies on the wildcat .375.284 if I am not mistaken was something like 160 bucks-ouch! Those were just RCBS too.

    So....it is going to be the .375-.284 and I do like Murphs writings on that particular cartridge and the new RCM's.

    best regards,

  11. #11

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    Sources of 284 cases can dry up sometimes, so next time you see them, grab plenty. They're unique enough, I don't know of anything that will sub.

    Can't say about wildcats, but in a couple of Savage 99's, a Winchester 100, and a couple of bolts case life in the original 284 cal has been outstanding.

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    As to the use of Hornady brass, I have an unopened case of this brass in 6.5/.284. I would not use it for any project with out annealing the neck/shoulder area.. I bought this brass when the Lapua brass was not available (this is not a problem now). This brass needs annealing twice, If you are going t neck it up and reform Hornady brass. (brittle stuff)
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    As to the use of Hornady brass, I have an unopened case of this brass in 6.5/.284. I would not use it for any project with out annealing the neck/shoulder area.. I bought this brass when the Lapua brass was not available (this is not a problem now). This brass needs annealing twice, If you are going t neck it up and reform Hornady brass. (brittle stuff)

    I will agree the new Hornady brass is a little stiff. The 376 will neck up to a mere .411" but any extensive change will merit annealing. I have 400 rounds of Hornady 375 Ruger basic (cylindrical) brass to anneal and form over the next two months and that should get me back in practice. My dies are delayed ....supposed to be 16 weeks but it will be at least 20 weeks because they "are just behind on orders". So my greatest hope is the end of July now. I'll just anneal and wait for the dies. I might do some make shift forming with the soft cases but just for a trial run.

    My 376 wildcat has about 40 cases that have been fired three or four times each and it seems to be doing ok, the cases are still good. Most loads were mild with some as fire forming loads only. I anneal everything that has any extensive forming in its future.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    I will agree the new Hornady brass is a little stiff. The 376 will neck up to a mere .411" but any extensive change will merit annealing. I have 400 rounds of Hornady 375 Ruger basic (cylindrical) brass to anneal and form over the next two months and that should get me back in practice. My dies are delayed ....supposed to be 16 weeks but it will be at least 20 weeks because they "are just behind on orders". So my greatest hope is the end of July now. I'll just anneal and wait for the dies. I might do some make shift forming with the soft cases but just for a trial run.

    My 376 wildcat has about 40 cases that have been fired three or four times each and it seems to be doing ok, the cases are still good. Most loads were mild with some as fire forming loads only. I anneal everything that has any extensive forming in its future.
    I like the before and after annealing to be on the safe side, just to cut down on any potential brass lost. Normally, I only anneal after forming and before loading the first time. This brass is so poorly annealed from the factory, that to be on the safe side, I prefer the do it twice. But that's just me.

    I wish all this Hornady brass was in somebody else shop and not in mine.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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