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Thread: Nabesna Road Trails

  1. #1
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Question Nabesna Road Trails

    Greetings,

    Would like to get the kids out on some longer ATV trips this summer. Anyone have recent trail conditions and good trail recomendations off the Nabesna Road?

    Thanks

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    I've never ridden there but it doesn't look to promising here...

    http://www.nps.gov/wrst/planyourvisit/upload/Nabesna%20ORV%20map%20and%20guide.pdf

    The longer trails all appear to be closed to recreational riding.

  3. #3

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    We rode the Big Grayling lakes trail a couple of years ago in mid August and the ride was good. Be aware that there are a few spots that can get real muddy but you can pick your way through it. We rode as far as we could then camped. Don't forget to get your permit at the rangers station, we didn't do our homework and had to go back and get them. Have fun.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by sr12345 View Post
    I've never ridden there but it doesn't look to promising here...

    http://www.nps.gov/wrst/planyourvisit/upload/Nabesna%20ORV%20map%20and%20guide.pdf

    The longer trails all appear to be closed to recreational riding.
    Are those trails still closed?

  5. #5

    Default Trails

    Most of the trails along the Nabesna Road are closed to recreational use. You have to be a qualified subsistence user to be able to use most of these trails. There are a "couple" that are still open, so you might call the Slana ranger station (if it is open during the winter) and ask.

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    The NPS link seems to indicate that the trails heading south into the hard park are the ones that are closed to recreational use. The ones heading north into the preserve remain open. That's the way I read it.

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    Closed till 2011 for an environmental impact statement; then, for sure, closed forever unless you're a citizen with special rights.

    Tim

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    I Would Like To Know If These Trails Fall Under RS2477 Trails

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    Default Comment open on ORV plan

    All:
    Posting from work today -- The NPS put out this press release (below) on Monday regarding the EIS and the comment period for draft alternatives.

    Also, there is info on this link: http://www.nps.gov/wrst/planyourvisi...ice%202007.pdf regarding which trails are open and which are closed. It notes that recreational orv permits will be issued after the ground is frozen, which I assume it is. Also a phone number for more info.
    John Quinley
    NPS Public Affairs

    Wrangell-St. Elias ORV Alternatives Offered

    Six draft alternatives for managing recreational off-road vehicle use in the Nabesna Road area of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve are available for public review and comment through January 10, 2009.

    The park is developing an environmental impact statement considering the effects of ORVs on nine trails in the Nabesna District of the park. Comments on the draft alternatives will be used to refine the alternatives which will be fully analyzed in a draft environmental impact statement, which is scheduled to be released for public comment in November 2009.

    The EIS process was started last year in part to comply with the settlement of a lawsuit regarding National Park Service management of ORV use in the park. “The intent of the plan is to provide continued opportunities for appropriate and reasonable access to wilderness and backcountry recreation including sport hunting in the preserve, while accommodating subsistence uses, access to inholdings, and protecting fish and wildlife habitat and other park values,” said Park Superintendent Meg Jensen.

    The alternatives addresses ORV use on the Caribou Creek, Trail Creek, Soda Lake, Lost Creek, Reeve Field, Boomerang, Suslota, Tanada and Copper Lake trails.

    Comments are being sought on draft proposals that include opening recreational ORV use on all nine trails, closing use on those trails, three alternatives which provide for varying levels of trail improvements for ORVs, and the implementation of a trail user fee.

    Copies of the draft alternatives are available on-line at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/wrst. Comments may also be submitted on this website. Copies of the 14-page alternatives document can also be requested by phone at 907-822-7276. Hard copies of the document are available at park headquarters in Copper Center, the Glennallen Public Library and the Slana Post Office.

  10. #10

    Angry

    [QUOTE=toofewweekends;
    The EIS process was started last year in part to comply with the settlement of a lawsuit regarding National Park Service management of ORV use in the park.

    draft alternatives[/QUOTE]

    These two aspects are very important guys and gals. It took a lawsuit to make the Parkies do what they should have done before they started strongarming the locals. And to now see that the "alternatives" are out there before the study is complete, should tell us all something very sinister is about to happen. Again....Better look for another place to take the kids.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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  11. #11
    Member skip olsen's Avatar
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    I Talked To The Park Ranger Today, Subsitance Hunters Can Us There Atvs But You Our I Can't, As I Told Him I'm A Disabled Vet And I Can't Use Mine. I Told Him It Should Be Opened For Everone Our On One Including The Greeneys That Our Hiking. But We All Need To Go In And Comment Our They Will Close It Down. And They Are RS2477 Trails Skip

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    We really enjoy taking the kids up to the Denali Highway in the summer months before hunting season opens up. There are dozens of good trails that are open for all riders and they are usually in great shape in July. My personal favorite system starts at the gravel pit on the right just before the Big Su bridge about 50 miles in.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by skip olsen View Post
    But We All Need To Go In And Comment Our They Will Close It Down. And They Are RS2477 Trails Skip
    As soon as I heard about the EIS in '07 I figured its over; they'll be some sort of bs subsistence trails from now on out.

    I thought a guide put some of the trails around Tanada Lake in; I don't really know though.

    Anytime I hear about an EIS I figure it will eventually lead to a closure of some sort.

    Tim

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    Point taken akres.

    How do you "develop alternatives" when the EIS hasn't been released? That truly is puzzling. Wonder what kind of machines the subsistence users are riding that don't cause damage. I'm a little bitter about this issue as I had just found a good place out there to hunt sheep and now its closed. Coulda' woulda' shoulda' got one last time I was out there. Lots of sheep; partner failed, but I guess I'll save that for another thread!

    Tim

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    Point taken akres.

    How do you "develop alternatives" when the EIS hasn't been released? That truly is puzzling. Wonder what kind of machines the subsistence users are riding that don't cause damage. I'm a little bitter about this issue as I had just found a good place out there to hunt sheep and now its closed. Coulda' woulda' shoulda' got one last time I was out there. Lots of sheep; partner failed, but I guess I'll save that for another thread!

    Tim
    And to think...we are paying for this to happen to us. What a country!
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    These two aspects are very important guys and gals. It took a lawsuit to make the Parkies do what they should have done before they started strongarming the locals. And to now see that the "alternatives" are out there before the study is complete, should tell us all something very sinister is about to happen. Again....Better look for another place to take the kids.
    Akres, so true, and so pathetic and disgusting.

    Guys, know that the National Park Service is no friend of Alaskan (and other) non-subsistance sportsmen....

    I could write a book on the subtrofuge that has occurred down there; perhaps I will.


    One man's opinion....

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    Its so very sad what is happening to our state!

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    Default RE: alternative developments

    All:
    In most EIS processes, an agency will do scoping (to get ideas/concerns from the public) and then internally put together a draft EIS with several alternatives. From there it goes to public comment, and then final decisions are made.

    In this case, the NPS did the scoping and has put together draft alternatives for public comment. There is not a lot of environmental analysis with each one, nor are there the other items you'll find in an EIS (subsistence analysis, etc.) What we are hoping is that people will look over the initial ideas and comment constructively such that when we release the draft EIS for comment (in about a year) the alternatives in that version represent a better range of workable ideas.

    In a year, when that full-fledged draft EIS is put out to the public, there will be another public comment period (likely 60 days or so). After that, we will see what kind of comments we have and move forward with a final decision.

    This additional, and somewhat unusual, extra comment period is meant to better incorporate more comments from the wide range of people interested in how public lands are managed for recreation and access.

    Thanks for your continued interest in both the topic and the process.
    John Quinley
    NPS Public Affairs

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    Quote Originally Posted by toofewweekends View Post
    All:
    In most EIS processes, an agency will do scoping (to get ideas/concerns from the public) and then internally put together a draft EIS with several alternatives. From there it goes to public comment, and then final decisions are made.

    In this case, the NPS did the scoping and has put together draft alternatives for public comment. There is not a lot of environmental analysis with each one, nor are there the other items you'll find in an EIS (subsistence analysis, etc.) What we are hoping is that people will look over the initial ideas and comment constructively such that when we release the draft EIS for comment (in about a year) the alternatives in that version represent a better range of workable ideas.

    In a year, when that full-fledged draft EIS is put out to the public, there will be another public comment period (likely 60 days or so). After that, we will see what kind of comments we have and move forward with a final decision.

    This additional, and somewhat unusual, extra comment period is meant to better incorporate more comments from the wide range of people interested in how public lands are managed for recreation and access.

    Thanks for your continued interest in both the topic and the process.
    John Quinley
    NPS Public Affairs
    Thanks for the input, John. It takes guts to come on here <grin>. Some of us are less than happy with the park service (and have been for many years) and the vast powers afforded them.

    I'm going to research this lawsuit and the draft particulars and see what's going on (unless someone has the details to posit).
    Guys, I'll post what I find out.

    Frank

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