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Thread: .375 H&h

  1. #1
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    Default .375 H&h

    Anyone with experience with some of these guns have any recommendations on which BRAND of .375 H&H for spring brown bear hunting on the AK Penninsula...Ruger, Remington, Winchester, Savage, etc.?

    And grain of bullet...270, 300, etc.?

    And scope?

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    Default Remingtons have done well for me

    Hey,

    I used a Remington for my hunt, see the Kodiak Brown bear hunt post a few down. I used handloaded barnes bullets in both 235 and 270 grain. My scope is a 2.5 by 10 Nikon. I took the gun out of the wood stock it was in and put it in the new XCR remington stock, I had to remove some of the plastic in the forearm to get the bigger barrel in there. I glass bedded it in as well. I did have to take a piece of emery cloth to the underside of the magazine, it had a very sharp edge on it. It shoots very well, I tried a few handloads before I got the velocity and accuracy I was looking for. Most were at or under an inch at 100 yards. All my Remingtons are like that, even the autoloader. What you use should really depend on how it feels, or handles and shoots for you. Good luck.

    Take Care, Rick

    I did have one other thing done to the rifle, I had Gary Junk a gunsmith in Fairbanks put an arctic coat finish on it.
    Last edited by chocolabfam; 06-10-2008 at 18:07. Reason: Additional info

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    Default

    1st choice: Winchester 70 Classic (control round feed). Very simple trigger design and the most durable feeding and ejection system.
    2nd: Ruger. Great control round feed action although you might give equal consideration to the 375 Ruger. Trigger design almost as simple as the Win 70.
    3rd: Remington. Good action, but I have learned to dislike the enclosed trigger system due to having it freeze up on me. Never had a problem with one feeding or ejecting but some people really dislike that small piece of metal that catches the lip of the cartridge to eject it.
    4th: Savage. Good rifle at a really great price. Standard pushfeed but a nice trigger. Little crude in how they function but most likely the best rifle on the market for the money if you can get past there looks.

    Any good bullet in either 270 or 300 grain such as Swift A frame, Barnes XXX, Nosler Partitions, Woodleigh, etc. I would pick the one that shot best in the rifle.

    Enjoy making your decision
    Tennessee

  4. #4
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    375 Ruger Alaskan loaded with 270-grain Barnes TSX bullets.

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    Default

    Look around for a good Whitworth in .375 H&H. You can find them used for lower than new prices. Good old Mauser actions and some have the plastic stocks. Top with Leupold Var-X III 1.5-5 and you are good to go, except for a good sling of course.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Default 375 H&h

    Kimber also makes 375's... the Caprivi for African look and the ... "Talkeetna".. made for Alaska style terrain. Pricey... think of them as semi-custom.

    I'd go with a good functional Win 70 stainless.

    The "new" 798 Remington is a good priced 375.... or go for the CZ-550....

    Plenty of models to choose from.... all in a great caliber.

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    Default

    Anyone recommend some sort of bipod on the rifle for stability or is that too sissy

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    I wouldnt want a bipod on mine. Adds weight and shoudnt be needed. Pratice a lot from the sit position or take shooting sticks that can be stowed in a day pack. 150 yds is a long shot for BB IMO. As far as rifles I agree w/ snowwolf, but dont over look the CZ.

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    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Default my vote

    My Vote goes to the Browning A-Bolt,24" SS Stalker W/sights and QD mount for the scope.

  10. #10

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    There are so many good choices which makes it a lot of fun from Sako, Winchester, Remington, CZ, Browning, Weatherby Mark V's, Rugers and others. You should have a lot of fun choosing and if limited in funds there will still be a lot to choose from and I sure hope we never loose this privilege.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    Default

    on the ruger 375 M77 Alaskan rifle, how much amo will the gun hold without one in the chamber? anyone know?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigE View Post
    on the ruger 375 M77 Alaskan rifle, how much amo will the gun hold without one in the chamber? anyone know?
    Three in the box, one in the chamber.

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    The latest .375 I shot was a Remington 797 and it shot very well for me. Everything was smooth and worked well.

    I have also played with a Remington 700 XCR and find this the ultimate factory all-weather rifle.

    There are new Model 70 Winchesters coming down the pipe and I have shot a 243 and a 270. If I get my hands on their all-weather model, I will happily report on it. The ones I shot were dang near perfect in action and performance.

  14. #14

    Smile Well......

    All of them should work for 1 brown bear hunt. However, if you plan on this gun being with you for a long time, used often and being handed down to a loved one then the choice is easier. If a gun and caliber can be a legend then the Mod. 70 in .375 H&H is it. I have one pre-64 and 1 new stainless classic Winchester .375. The old one holds 4 rounds in the magazine and the new one is in the shop being set up to do that. They have the simplest and most reliable hunting trigger I am aware of, and a very reliable extractor and ejector. The safety locks the bolt, the trigger and blocks the sear. You can field strip the bolt with out tools. The controlled round feed Winchester .375's I have are going to my grandkids.

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    when you're talking about the Winchester 70, is this one that was made before '64 or is there a new one made now with the same control feed mechinism?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yooper916 View Post
    The latest .375 I shot was a Remington 797 and it shot very well for me. Everything was smooth and worked well.

    I have also played with a Remington 700 XCR and find this the ultimate factory all-weather rifle.

    There are new Model 70 Winchesters coming down the pipe and I have shot a 243 and a 270. If I get my hands on their all-weather model, I will happily report on it. The ones I shot were dang near perfect in action and performance.
    I am sorry to ask a question that will get this thread off track, but you have actually handled and shot the newly released Winchester model 70's?
    Tennessee

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigE View Post
    when you're talking about the Winchester 70, is this one that was made before '64 or is there a new one made now with the same control feed mechinism?
    Could be either. The "new" Winchesters that have control round feed (crf) are also called Classics. They were made up till Winchester quit production of the model 70 approximately 30 months ago. Winchester also made many rifles via the pushfeed system. But all Classics are CRF.
    Tennessee

  18. #18

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    I have the Browning A bolt stainless stalker with BOSS. My suggestion is to get a 375 that has a muzzle break. The recoil on these can be brutal. Also, take this as a lesson learned the hard way, by a scope that has a lot of eye relief. I went with a Leupold because you can get up to 5" of eye relief on some of their models at lower powers that you would probably want to shoot from anyway.
    Loving God, Loving People, Loving America--Serving All Three

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    backcuntry, what size leopold did you get? I'm looking at the 1-5x leopold for brown bear or the 1.5-6 Schmidt & Bender. I was considering a muzzle breaker, but wasn't sure how keen a guide would be if I had one on my rifle due to the noise?? Thanks for the suggestions though...is your's pretty loud with the MB?

  20. #20
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    http://www.chuckhawks.com/muzzle_brakes.htm

    The muzzle blast from a powerful muzzle brake equipped rifle is so loud that even with hearing protection the shooter risks suffering some permanent hearing damage after a few shots. Earmuff type hearing protectors typically reduce noise by about 25 dB. A muzzle brake equipped magnum rifle (like a .300 or .338 Magnum) produces a sound pressure level (spl) in the 130-dB range, according to reports I have read. Thus the spl inside the hearing protector is in excess of 100 dB, a potentially damaging level.
    For a hunter in the field, shooting without ear protection, the muzzle blast from a muzzle brake is immediately deafening. Nearly complete temporary deafness usually lasts from about a minute to several minutes after firing a powerful magnum rifle equipped with a muzzle brake. Later almost all of the shooter's hearing returns, but a certain amount is permanently lost, and the losses are cumulative.
    This is why hunting rifles equipped with muzzle brakes are illegal in some African jurisdictions. They have proven damaging to the unprotected hearing of the scouts and guides accompanying the hunter. In North America an increasing number of big game guides now refuse to let a sport use a rifle equipped with a muzzle brake for the same reason.

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