Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Shrimping noob questions

  1. #1
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default Shrimping noob questions

    I finally picked up a pair of shrimp pots and some floating line, and have a few questions about rigging them. I'm planning on running 1000' of line to allow shrimping in 600' of water. The line is on 400' spools, so I was planning on splicing the line into a 1000' length.

    Do folks run all 5 pots on a single drop, or run say 2 pots on one drop, and 3 on the other? How far apart do you run the pots? Do you use ss carabines to clip the pots to the line?

    I didn't see any requirements on what type of buoy to use, I have a spare jumbo sized fender and was planning on using it, running a 4# cod sinker 200' from the buoy to sink the line, then run 800' of line to the pots. I'm planning on putting a 1# sinker in the corner of each pot to help them drop and stay put, is that enough weight in the pots?

    I've searched through 6 pages of posts running the search function, and found answers for most of my questions.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    There are lots of ways to approach this, but here is what I do. (These tactics were adapted from growing up on my parents' commercial fishing boat when there used to be a commercial pot fishery in the Sound.)

    -We run all five pots on one line. We use the ropes that were set up for the commercial fishery, which used to be 20 pots per line. There are loops every 3-4 fathoms (I think), and we skip the first five and then put a pot on every third loop. I'm not sure if my measurement is exact, but it works out to a pot every 50 feet or so. We snap them onto the loops that are spliced into the main line using longline snaps, which can be purchased at B&J Commercial on C and N. Lights. Above the pots we usually use two one pound sinkers placed about 100 and 200 feet below the buoy. We do not use any extra weight in the pots, but our pots have a frame made out of rebar, so that may not apply in your case.

  3. #3

    Default

    Keep in mind that with only 5 pots for your limit, you can't cover too much ground if you keep the pots too close to one-another. That being said, I wouldn't stretch your pot distance to more than 20 fathoms anyhow, 10 fathoms would prob be a good place to start w/.

    Just tie a knot through your dropper loop off your ground line and save the snap money. Simple to untie if you need to do something different for a different set.

    A 1000' feet of line sounds like an awful lot of line for a single bundle. We have pre-made shots of lines so we can tailor each set based on the depth we need by using different combinations of 50 fathom, 20 fathom and 10 fathom shots of lines that works out really well. We usually shoot for 10 fathoms more line than the depth we drop the pot in. Never morth than 20 fathoms though. But like the last guy wrote, our pots are made of rebar so they weigh a little more than some pots so this helps anchor them better than a lightweight pot.

  4. #4
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    For 650 feet of water I run 900 feet of line. I brake it down 300 feet. and use a U connection to connect them all. If I go shallower I just remove one section. I run two pots on each buoy. This year I will have one that will have 3 on it.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wasilla Alaska
    Posts
    456

    Default One trip more than a new guy myself!

    Having very limited experience myself, my thoughts may not count for much. ALL of this information was passed on from the guy I got the gear from. His recomendation was to space the pots 100 ft apart,(reasoning) you are then working on a larger area AND if you are in a marginal area some of your pots may still get "in the zone" if the bottom line is long enough.
    This is spliced (dont be afraid to try this) to the 600 ft buoy line for a grand total of 700 ft from 1st pot to bouy. This allows me to easily fish in 550 to 600 ft of water.
    We experimented with the bait thing and are strongly favoring the pellets.
    I cut a 2 inch piece of PVC length wise and glued on end caps. Then poured it full of cement and set it on the floor, tipped the pot on edge and nestled it into the cement and let dry. Two per pot. Just right.
    Our first ever 3 pulls netted 8 1/2 to 9 gallons of shrimp which netted 3 1/2 gallons of tails.
    The most important thing I learned, there is not much to this. Put in bait, drop to bottom, pull up, remove shrimp.
    Like Steve (potbuilder) told me, "were smarter than them, that's why we catch em and eat em!
    Mike

  6. #6
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Paul,
    Make sure you have 25-30% more buoyline than the depth of the water you will be fishing (i don't care what other's do ,this works & you won't have any "stolen pots"). Space them out 60-100ft apart. For weight i tell my customers to use 6-8lbs per pot(you can't make them too heavy). The buoy you have will work fine. STAY AWAY FROM THE LONGLINE SNAPS !! they come off the line if they pull just the right way. Just remember "steep & deep" and you'll catch some of them PWS saltwater cockroaches

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  7. #7
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    STAY AWAY FROM THE LONGLINE SNAPS !! they come off the line if they pull just the right way.
    Have you actually lost some this way, Steve? In my 25 years of experience, I can't recall ever losing a pot that was snapped on with longline snaps. Of course, we don't snap it right onto the line, but onto loops that are spliced into the line.

  8. #8
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Have you actually lost some this way, Steve? In my 25 years of experience, I can't recall ever losing a pot that was snapped on with longline snaps. Of course, we don't snap it right onto the line, but onto loops that are spliced into the line.
    I did have a gillnet buddy of mine lose one pot with a snap on his first trip shrimping. Lots of folks at the shows tell me that they have had pots stolen out of the middle of their line, when i ask if they use snaps they usually say yes and when i snap one onto the rope, give it a twist and pull, it comes right off, they just look at each other and say"oh yeah" now we know what happened. I will say that your way of snapping them onto a loop in the line should get rid of the problem somewhat, the loop must act like a swivel. I tie everything in on my gear, all those years of lobster'in does that to a guy, i can tie good knots that stay put and more importantly they come apart when you need them to.
    I used to lobster in the offshore canyons 100 miles offshore, we fished all 5/8" rope, 40 pots to a line, 25 fathoms apart(over a mile of rope) and had 3 buoys on each line, a bouy on each end and a center buoy. Had 2 haulers on the rail one to haul the mainline(16" plates w/2 hydro motors running the big hauler) & a 12" hauler mounted on top of the big one that just hauled the center buoys, that way we never had to stop hauling the main line just to pull a center buoy. Then later in the fall and thru the winter I tied 2 lines together, 80 pots & 2 miles of rope, and had 5 buoys on that rigging. Quite the pile of rope on deck and you should of seen the dance we did on the back deck setting all that gear,even when it was freezing to the deck. After getting our brains beat out of us for most of the winter we brought the pots in and switched over to dragging for the rest of the winter and into the spring.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Thanks for the tips. I spliced two 400' spools of 1/4" floating line together with eyes on each end and put a 4# cod sinker 20 fathoms from the buoy to keep the line from coiling up a the surface at slack tide. I took a 100' length of 1/4" line and spliced eye's on each end to connect the two pots together and clip to the main line. I have a couple of carabiners to clip them to the line.

    So barring the use of the biners, what would be the best knot to use to connect the pots and line between the pots to the buoy line?

    I have a spot I plan to try that is steep, and whenever we'd catch yelloweye they'd be puking up shrimp.

  10. #10
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Thanks for the tips. I spliced two 400' spools of 1/4" floating line together with eyes on each end and put a 4# cod sinker 20 fathoms from the buoy to keep the line from coiling up a the surface at slack tide. I took a 100' length of 1/4" line and spliced eye's on each end to connect the two pots together and clip to the main line. I have a couple of carabiners to clip them to the line.

    So barring the use of the biners, what would be the best knot to use to connect the pots and line between the pots to the buoy line?

    I have a spot I plan to try that is steep, and whenever we'd catch yelloweye they'd be puking up shrimp.
    Paul,
    Your buoyline will want to float no matter what the tide is doing so put the weight down deeper to keep the slack from floating up on itself. I have a knot i use to attach my tail lines(from pot to mainline) if you send me your regular email addy i'll foreward you how to tie the knot in 3 pictures. You want your line to look something like this picture gear.jpg

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  11. #11

    Default pot soaking time

    How long are people soaking their pots. If I am going out for an over night trip should i check them after each tide ? or longer?

  12. #12

    Default

    In regards to Steve's 25%-35% more line than depth.... My dad ran 150 pots daily during the entire shrimping season for several years and purposely would not run that much line and never came close to losing a pot. That being said, and I'm sure that Steve would agree, these were heavy pots that didn't move from tide...a lightweight pot that's more apt to fall down the bank by being drug simply because of a good chop coming offshore, yah you might lose the pot easily. However, as Steve also said which I did as well, you can't have too much weight, just be sure you can pull back the weight you throw over.

    As far as the amount of soak time... we've been bringing our pots back after each trip so we didn't have to worry about theft at all... if we lose a pot when it's on shore locked in the boat I guess it just wasn't meant to be. On the last trip out, left the dock early Sunday morn, dropped the pots, caught 5 butts (all small), a couple yellow eye, 18.5 pounds of tails and had the boat pulled and back to Wasilla by 8pm that evening.

    Overnight soaks are generally better but in this case we didn't have the overnight to do.

  13. #13

    Default

    I'm envious of Steve's lobster catches though, sounds like a blast.

    Did you drag for those lobsters steve? You obviously know how to fish for the spots and what type of terrain they live in... could you imagine dragging a beam trawl for spots? When I was 14 years old, I fished for on a shrimp trawler named the Valiant. We of course trawled for pinks and our catch was based on volume. Most days we'd come in w/ twenty thousand pounds or so of pinks. There was one specific day that old man Elmer took me over to this rocky island and had me prep the boom for launch and I though he was nuts... we were looking at the edge of a rocky ledge and he wanted to throw over the trawl.... we did it and drug for no more than 100 yards for less than an hour maybe only 45 min... anyhow when we pulled the trawl back up I couldn't beleive the catch. We had about 4 to 500 pounds of HUGE spot prawns.

    I later learned of another guy that used to disappear from the harbor on his trawler for about two weeks and would return with about $30k worth of spots from trawling. He died with his spot remaining a secret.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •