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Thread: I'm making the leap

  1. #1
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Default I'm making the leap

    I just made the leap to give fly fishing a shot. Following the advice on the forum, that a 5 and 8 weight rod will cover almost everything in alaska, I ordered a cheapie cabela's genisis combo in 8 wt. Then I realized that my girlfriend will likely want to try and learn too so I went ahead and got the 5 wt too. Hopefully I can learn how use one fishing for pike and bass while I'm on leave back home in WI. The cool thing is I will have both rods in the truck for my drive to Alaska so maybe I can get into something on the way.

    Just wanted to share my excitement.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  2. #2

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    [quote=MNViking;282742]I just made the leap to give fly fishing a shot. quote]

    For freshwater fishing, you will never look back. The only time I've grabbed anything but a fly rod in the past 35 years (when I switched) is when I'm on the salt. I have even caught a couple smallish hallibut on a fly rod in shallower waters while actually trolling for kings. Your 5 and 8 will cover most of the freshwater fish up here pretty well. Good luck and remember fly casting is mostly timeing and feel. Let that back cast strighten out before you come forward.

  3. #3
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    MNViking,

    I would also recommend you get 4 piece fly rods instead of the traditional 2 piece. The 4 pieces are lot easier to transport and you can take them hiking without the rods or rod holder sticking 3 feet above your backpack. Once I got the 4 piece I hardly ever touch the 2 piece.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fish49st8 View Post
    MNViking,

    I would also recommend you get 4 piece fly rods instead of the traditional 2 piece. The 4 pieces are lot easier to transport and you can take them hiking without the rods or rod holder sticking 3 feet above your backpack. Once I got the 4 piece I hardly ever touch the 2 piece.

    This is true, but at the start, you will get a much crisper action from a cheaper two piece than you will a cheaper 4 piece. I'd just get what you can afford, then learn what you like, then your next rod needs to be a closer to the top of the line model, with a fantastic warranty and take it from there. Just getting out there is the biggest thing at this point. You can start donating your 401k later when the bug officially bites you.

  5. #5
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Good advice...

    [quote=Alaskan Fly Guy;282765]
    Quote Originally Posted by MNViking View Post
    I just made the leap to give fly fishing a shot. quote]

    For freshwater fishing, you will never look back. The only time I've grabbed anything but a fly rod in the past 35 years (when I switched) is when I'm on the salt. I have even caught a couple smallish hallibut on a fly rod in shallower waters while actually trolling for kings. Your 5 and 8 will cover most of the freshwater fish up here pretty well. Good luck and remember fly casting is mostly timeing and feel. Let that back cast strighten out before you come forward.
    And welcome aboard! I agree with AFG - and many others, it's been a satisfying switch on so many levels. And Catch It too - just get out there. Watching others will be the best education - and fun too. You be here for Fall fishing? Some think Fall fishing in Alaska is purty good!

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Well it will be darn close to winter. I should roll into Anchorage around October 14th. I'm going to buy a fishing licence as soon as I can after I cross the border and try and catch a fish as soon as I can.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    October! Perfect time to fish for Dollies and Rainbows using flesh and egg patterns.

    Any fishing in Korea? Just curious I see you are stationed there.

    Have a safe trip.

  8. #8
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    If you are driving up, make you stop in the Yukon for some Grayling. You can catch fish in the streams right off the road. I stopped in a campground on the last drive up, casted out to straighten my line and WHAM! I wasn't even fishing, just getting ready and killing time around camp. I caught over 40 nice little grayling before breakfast and didn't even plan to fish the stream.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  9. #9
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fish49st8 View Post
    October! Perfect time to fish for Dollies and Rainbows using flesh and egg patterns.

    Any fishing in Korea? Just curious I see you are stationed there.

    Have a safe trip.
    There are a few bass ponds around and there are rainbows in some of the lakes and streams. Unfortunatly most of the places are overfished.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  10. #10
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    I cut my fly fishing teeth working the lily pad flats on local ponds, casting cork poppers to bluegills and bass.

    As already said it's rhythm and feel. Lefty Kreh makes some great instructional videos if you want to go that route.

    For casting mechanics, I recommend practicing out on the lawn (no fly). Trying to learn on the water can be frustrating, especially if the fish are biting and you can't get your fly to them, or there are crowds.

    last bit: When casting, wherever goes the rod tip, so goes the fly
    (if you pass the rod tip over your head you will catch an ear)

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