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Thread: Trigger input

  1. #1
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default Trigger input

    I have a Kimber Montana in .300wsm that I am thinking about retriggering. The gun shoots very well now but I wouldn't mind tightening the groups up a bit. Does anyone have any thoughts/opinions on this, like, is it worth my time/money, and if so, what triggers are recommended?

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    kimbers have an adjustable trigger. A new trigger is going to cost $200 or more. IE Timely or eqv.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    I have a Kimber Montana in .300wsm that I am thinking about retriggering. The gun shoots very well now but I wouldn't mind tightening the groups up a bit. Does anyone have any thoughts/opinions on this, like, is it worth my time/money, and if so, what triggers are recommended?
    Aftermarket triggers would be similar to the Kimber trigger which is adjustable. It would be a waste of good gas money to buy a replacement trigger. Also any improvement in group size as the result of a trigger change lies in the head of the shooter.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    If Kimber triggers are similar to M70, Jim Carmichael has a good article on their adjustment/stoning in one of his books. It is very easy to do and if you continue to stone and try, it is safe. If not, take it to a gun smith that knows what he is doing. J.

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    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Aftermarket triggers would be similar to the Kimber trigger which is adjustable. It would be a waste of good gas money to buy a replacement trigger. Also any improvement in group size as the result of a trigger change lies in the head of the shooter.

    Even though I like my triggers to be creep free and near 3.5lbs., it has been my experience that the above statement is true.

    I have never had a problem making good groups on the bench with a crappy trigger. Field positions is where a relatively good trigger shines.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Trigger's role in pursuing the shot

    Hmmm, a little voice saying something about "where angels fear to tread..." Having a trigger set light (adjusting the factory trigger maybe) and breaks cleanly could help tighten his groups though, correct?

    Something I read (Wayne van Zwoll in The Hunter's Guide to Accurate Shooting, Ch 8, "Hunting with Lightweights", more posted on another thread, http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...368#post609368), suggests that shooting lightweight hunting rifles requires (or makes more critical) certain skills; some different, some just more decisive for making good shots.

    Four seconds (or so) is all you should need and a well tuned trigger can help. As I understand the author, the trigger's role becomes more critical in accurately shooting lightweight hunting rifles because unlike heavier rifles or benchrest shooting, a lightweight hunting rifle has to be held, not just supported. Being held requires more muscle input. Muscles tire if we hold the rifle too long. He recommends a trigger responsive enough to break in a shorter time than other rifles (within 4 seconds) - a part of what he called "pursuing the shot". He also uses a lighter trigger (2 lbs) than most it seems. It reminded me of a bowhunting tip Rod Miland gave me - to practice a shooting routine that results in releasing the arrow within 6 seconds - because that's all you should need - beyond that you often complicate matters by introducing other factors.

    Comments? Way off base? (Maybe van Zwoll referring to shooting/hunting newbies, "Hunting with Lightweights"?)

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6XLeech View Post
    Hmmm, a little voice saying something about "where angels fear to tread..." Having a trigger set light (adjusting the factory trigger maybe) and breaks cleanly could help tighten his groups though, correct?

    Something I read (Wayne van Zwoll in The Hunter's Guide to Accurate Shooting, Ch 8, "Hunting with Lightweights", more posted on another thread, http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...368#post609368), suggests that shooting lightweight hunting rifles requires (or makes more critical) certain skills; some different, some just more decisive for making good shots.

    Comments? Way off base? (Maybe van Zwoll referring to shooting/hunting newbies, "Hunting with Lightweights"?)
    I think we've been down this road a few times before. I remember a pretty good discussion here on what some of us consider practical.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=63566

    I find a crisp, repeatable trigger is more important IMO than its actual pull weight all else being equal. I'll take a "good" 5 pound pull over a creeping and crawling 2.5 pounds every time, though a trigger need not be 5 pounds for the field. A light trigger can help tighten groups, but the key to better groups is keeping the sights aligned on the target and triggers are not the weakest link for most shooters.

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Kimbers usually have pretty good triggers from factory. That said take it to Stan Jackson in Anchorage and he will do as good a job as ANYONE can and for only $50. The trigger on my Ruger from the factory left a lot to be desired. Now it's outstandingly crisp with 0 creep.

    Brett

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Much better put...

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    ...a crisp, repeatable trigger is more important IMO than its actual pull weight all else being equal... A light trigger can help tighten groups, but the key to better groups is keeping the sights aligned on the target and triggers are not the weakest link for most shooters.
    Yes, you're right. Don't intend to detract from the OP's main question at all, which I understood to be whether retriggering might help tighten his shot groups. From Kimber's design and reputation, responders here say, "probably not". But, exceptions happen and being a lightweight rifle, it might matter more than with other rifles. Last year, when I bought a used Kimber and being new to hunting rifles, I had it checked out by gunsmith, Andy Hawk, who checked out the trigger right away. It was fine of course, but I suppose in AK Troutbum's case, it wouldn't hurt to take his Kimber by and ask a gunsmith if there's room for improvement.

    Interesting topic - as was that other thread.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Adam Barringer View Post
    Kimbers usually have pretty good triggers from factory. That said take it to Stan Jackson in Anchorage and he will do as good a job as ANYONE can and for only $50. The trigger on my Ruger from the factory left a lot to be desired. Now it's outstandingly crisp with 0 creep.

    Brett
    I agree. The triggers on my Kimbers have always been good. I don't know if I would even bother with a trigger job on a Kimber.

  11. #11

    Default other means of tightening groups

    You might do better to use other means to attempt to tighten up your groups, such as using a diffrent load or reloading to try and find a sweet combination which shoots more accurately. I have a kimber and tried different loads with different powders and bullets and found my sweet load combination and now it shoots MOA.

    Good luck!
    CHAPS

  12. #12

    Smile triggers...

    I like triggers that can be adjusted to a creep free 3 lb. break for my big game hunting rifles. It is easier for me to shoot them "off hand". I really like simple and reliable triggers like the older Mod. 70 Win. has. You can see how they work and they don't trap dirt, mud, crud, oil, ice, etc. I don't like the triggers that have enclosed housings where they have the potential to "trap" that sort of stuff and you can't see inside the housing. So I would encourage you to have a "reliable" trigger on your rifle.

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