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Thread: Does a KING...

  1. #1
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Does a KING...

    ...bite a yarn hook with a bead above it? Or are ya flossin em?

    My 'theory' is that the fish may, at times, see it and put his mouth around it to move it - if ya set the hook at this critical moment you have a lively critter on the end of your line.

    So - how does it work? Flossin or bitin?

  2. #2

    Default Biting for sure

    While it is possible to floss a king, my suspicion, based on years of experience and many netted kings, is that they no doubt aggressively bite the presentation. So, this begs the question, why does a king salmon, who is not eating in freshwater bite?

    The answer is a mystery for all sakes and purposes. Some believe that the king is ingesting, but not digesting. That is, earlier that day/or recent days, they were eating while in the salt water, maybe that instinct is still present, however the digestive system begins to deteriorate once the fish hits the fresh. Or it could be that the strike is defensive/annoyance? Lord only knows. But the fact that I rarely catch a king on the outside of the mouth or foul hooked implies that they are taking the bait.

    A sockeye on the other hand is a different story. You are more likely to hook them on the outside of the mouth or foul hook them (many exceptions of course). This is particularly true in the Kenai and kasilof where the visibility is limited and the masses of fish are great. The best way to catch these is to dead drift the fly at the right depth and because of the large masses of fish you will eventually "floss" them.

    The standard presentation for kings is either back trolling where the bait is practically stationary, or back bouncing, again stationary with action. Sometimes the bait is drifted that often causes an impulse strike. But, in my opinion, in most all cases, the fish strikes.

    You can also sense this by watching your rod if it is in a rod holder. At first, on many occasions, the tip goes down, but not hard. Sometimes this is even as light as a trout bite! Then the tip goes back and then Whammo! I think that the fish is taking the bait, and chewing on it at first and then once the fish turns to swim away the big take down occurs. Indeed, if you try to set the hook on the first indication of action with a king, you will loose many fish, where if you wait for the second hit, or if the fish starts to take out line and then set the hook, you will land more fish.

  3. #3
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Very good

    Nice description - and almost exactly what my uncle told me on Monday night at Ship...

  4. #4
    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Default All salmon Bite in Freshwater.........

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanfishguides View Post
    While it is possible to floss a king, my suspicion, based on years of experience and many netted kings, is that they no doubt aggressively bite the presentation. So, this begs the question, why does a king salmon, who is not eating in freshwater bite?

    The answer is a mystery for all sakes and purposes. Some believe that the king is ingesting, but not digesting. That is, earlier that day/or recent days, they were eating while in the salt water, maybe that instinct is still present, however the digestive system begins to deteriorate once the fish hits the fresh. Or it could be that the strike is defensive/annoyance? Lord only knows. But the fact that I rarely catch a king on the outside of the mouth or foul hooked implies that they are taking the bait.

    A sockeye on the other hand is a different story. You are more likely to hook them on the outside of the mouth or foul hook them (many exceptions of course). This is particularly true in the Kenai and kasilof where the visibility is limited and the masses of fish are great. The best way to catch these is to dead drift the fly at the right depth and because of the large masses of fish you will eventually "floss" them.

    The standard presentation for kings is either back trolling where the bait is practically stationary, or back bouncing, again stationary with action. Sometimes the bait is drifted that often causes an impulse strike. But, in my opinion, in most all cases, the fish strikes.

    You can also sense this by watching your rod if it is in a rod holder. At first, on many occasions, the tip goes down, but not hard. Sometimes this is even as light as a trout bite! Then the tip goes back and then Whammo! I think that the fish is taking the bait, and chewing on it at first and then once the fish turns to swim away the big take down occurs. Indeed, if you try to set the hook on the first indication of action with a king, you will loose many fish, where if you wait for the second hit, or if the fish starts to take out line and then set the hook, you will land more fish.

    Sockeye bite in freshwater along w/ all other salmon species... however w/ the exception of stream maturing steelhead none have the ability to digest food swallowed in fresh water, they however swallow things.

    The three main reasons that any salmon bites in fresh water are:

    1. Aggresion / Aggrevation
    2. Feeding instinct trigged
    3. Ovactory responce (typically triggered by ovarian fluid, i.e. eggs)

  5. #5

    Default I don't disagree

    Quote Originally Posted by TYNMON View Post
    Sockeye bite in freshwater along w/ all other salmon species... however w/ the exception of stream maturing steelhead none have the ability to digest food swallowed in fresh water, they however swallow things.

    The three main reasons that any salmon bites in fresh water are:

    1. Aggresion / Aggrevation
    2. Feeding instinct trigged
    3. Ovactory responce (typically triggered by ovarian fluid, i.e. eggs)
    I am not disagreeing. I have caught sockeye with while fishing for kings and silvers, no doubt about it, the sockeye bit hard!

    what I am saying is that in the often murky waters of the lower/mid Kenai/Kasilof, the default method of catching is flossing. In clear water, I have seen sockeye chasing flies, and on the west side of the inlet, in the very clear water, the sockeye will actually pick up lures from the bottom!

    So, with that in mind, take another look at my post...

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