Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Dry Firing?

  1. #1

    Default Dry Firing?

    Is dry firing bad for a firing pin?

  2. #2

    Default

    Dry firing rimfires will damage the chamber.
    CZ52 Pistols have a reputation of breaking firing pins upon dry firing
    Dry firing spring air guns will blow the seals.

    OTHOH, I use to dry fire my Hardball 45 and M14 a lot, all the time. Never seemed to make any difference that I noticed.

  3. #3

    Default

    Don't do it with a rimfire! As far as centerfires go, I've probably let the hammer fall on an empty chamber oh about a kazillion times and have never broken anything!

    I have taken brand splinter new rifles and set in my chair while watching TV and have cycled the bolt and tripped the trigger over and over for hours(not all in one sitting) just to smooth them up. Nothing smooths up an action like wear. Kinda wears on mother too! Sometimes it sends her to bed a couple hours early. Kinda like killing two birds with one stone if ya ax me!

  4. #4
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Don't do it with a rimfire! As far as centerfires go, I've probably let the hammer fall on an empty chamber oh about a kazillion times and have never broken anything!

    I have taken brand splinter new rifles and set in my chair while watching TV and have cycled the bolt and tripped the trigger over and over for hours(not all in one sitting) just to smooth them up. Nothing smooths up an action like wear. Kinda wears on mother too! Sometimes it sends her to bed a couple hours early. Kinda like killing two birds with one stone if ya ax me!
    I thought I was the only nut who does that, I'm glad to here you are also a little teched! I thought that was Gazillion.

    I have done it with every center fire gun I've ever handled and I'll continue to do it. I don't break much stuff but if it breaks I'll fix it and dry fire some more.
    To me that is the best way to: Break in an action. Get used to the tirgger. Know for sure if it is not loaded. (point it at a cat or mound of dirt) Practice with alignment and squeeze. Blaze trails and shoot great beasts without leaving your living room. Condition oneself to a new gun. Irritate others in the room or gunshop.

    Yes, always dry fire your centerfire rifle or handgun. It is good to point and click, too. We used to call it snapping in.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post


    (point it at a cat or mound of dirt)
    Great one Murphy. Now I've got to get the windex and clean my monitor.
    It was a little dusty anyway, but iced tea is sticky.

    Thanks

  6. #6

    Default

    [
    quote=elmerkeithclone;279760]Don't do it with a rimfire! As far as centerfires go, I've probably let the hammer fall on an empty chamber oh about a kazillion times and have never broken anything!
    Cool, I have dry fired my center fire rifle and pistols a bazillion times also, just read some material that suggested it was not good. And I dont own a rimfire, something that should be and will be corrected.

    I have taken brand splinter new rifles and set in my chair while watching TV and have cycled the bolt and tripped the trigger over and over for hours(not all in one sitting) just to smooth them up. Nothing smooths up an action like wear.
    I stopped watching TV a long tme ago, but I often dry fire my rifle while reading and posting on the forums


    Kinda wears on mother too! Sometimes it sends her to bed a couple hours early. Kinda like killing two birds with one stone if ya ax me!
    [/QUOTE]

    I wont ax ya, but becareful someone else don't

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    I have done it with every center fire gun I've ever handled and I'll continue to do it. I don't break much stuff but if it breaks I'll fix it and dry fire some more.
    Awesome Murphy, when I break mine I'll send it to you to fix


    To me that is the best way to: Break in an action. Get used to the tirgger. Know for sure if it is not loaded. (point it at a cat or mound of dirt) Practice with alignment and squeeze. Blaze trails and shoot great beasts without leaving your living room. Condition oneself to a new gun. Irritate others in the room or gunshop.
    Yep, yep, and yup

    Yes, always dry fire your centerfire rifle or handgun. It is good to point and click, too. We used to call it snapping in.
    I have and I will, good to be confirmed it's good

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 375AIJGS View Post
    Great one Murphy. Now I've got to get the windex and clean my monitor.
    It was a little dusty anyway, but iced tea is sticky.

    Thanks
    So I'm guessing you dry fire too??? at cats??? dirt???

  9. #9

    Default win/ rem

    they both say dri firing will work harden pins, Id hate to be on once in life time unt and see pin fall apart, cabelas sells snap caps to absorb the shok loading, I'd rather be lucky than good
    fshrman

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fshrman View Post
    they both say dri firing will work harden pins, Id hate to be on once in life time unt and see pin fall apart, cabelas sells snap caps to absorb the shok loading, I'd rather be lucky than good
    I dry fire quite a bit at dirt.
    Cats on the other hand.........tough call. Reloading makes some things more affordable.

  11. #11
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post


    I thought I was the only nut who does that, I'm glad to here you are also a little teched! I thought that was Gazillion.

    I have done it with every center fire gun I've ever handled and I'll continue to do it. I don't break much stuff but if it breaks I'll fix it and dry fire some more.
    To me that is the best way to: Break in an action. Get used to the tirgger. Know for sure if it is not loaded. (point it at a cat or mound of dirt) Practice with alignment and squeeze. Blaze trails and shoot great beasts without leaving your living room. Condition oneself to a new gun. Irritate others in the room or gunshop.

    Yes, always dry fire your centerfire rifle or handgun. It is good to point and click, too. We used to call it snapping in.
    Hey, I'm just as nuts as you are.

    I recently bought a Savage 93R17 in .17 HMR and did the same thing. I stick a spent .22 case in the chamber and crack the bolt just enough to cock the striker and snap away.

    I'm trying to lighten or at least smoothen the trigger before I spend the money on an aftermarket trigger/sear. A Dremel with polishing wheel is next. It did wonders for my Glock.
    Now what ?

  12. #12

    Talking snap it

    Quote Originally Posted by fshrman View Post
    they both say dri firing will work harden pins, Id hate to be on once in life time unt and see pin fall apart, cabelas sells snap caps to absorb the shok loading, I'd rather be lucky than good
    My sentiments exactly...why mess with "Murphy's Law" when it's not necessary. Probably won't hurt nutin to dry fire without a snap cap, but with all the other things that can go wrong, I don't want to add another possibility. Just me. One other question...does Murphy's Law apply to Murphy also, or just the rest of us numrods?
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Northern Rockies
    Posts
    97

    Default

    I did it for many years, tho some guns take more abuse than others.


    Dry firing can break firing pins in Winchester lever actions. The tip snaps off. First thing the gunsmith said when I brought mine in was "been dry firing it, haven't you?" I had been using an empty case, but the primer dents in very quickly, and doesnt do anything to help cushion the blow.


    I also have 3 broken Ruger transfer bars from dry firing several Blackhawks and Vaqueros. They all broke in exactly the same spot. A gunsmith I asked about it said he'd replaced a number of them also. I keep spares on hand now.


    You can make your own snap caps with an empty case and a pencil eraser trimmed to fit and glued in place. Even store bought snap caps are cheap insurance to prevent an embarrasing moment in the field.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fshrman View Post
    they both say dri firing will work harden pins, Id hate to be on once in life time unt and see pin fall apart, cabelas sells snap caps to absorb the shok loading, I'd rather be lucky than good
    Kinda funny how the Ruger manual encourages dry firing on an "empty" chamber yet Remington and Winchester warn against it. Shows who has confidence in their own product now doesn't it.

    Rugers and 98 mausers have probably accounted for 95% of the 500 plus centerfire rifles that I have owned. That in part could be why I'm oblivious to broken firing pins. Come to think of it I've never had a problem with an extractor on a Ruger or 98 either yet I have a snuff can full of those anemic little failure prone 700 extractors that I have replaced for folk over the years.

    Its a wonder Remington doesn't have a warning indicating that actually firing your gun will cause wear on those little twisty things inside the hole that the bullet slides through and repeated firings will wear them little twisty things plumb out.

    Every time I open and shut my truck door I'm wearing out the latch but I'll be dogged if I'm gonna start crawling through the window to prevent it! DRY FIRE AWAY!

  15. #15

    Smile Lets all dy fire..............

    We should all dry fire our weapons as often as possible. As stated, dry fire all center fire weapons. I owe what ever skill I have achieved with sight alignment and the trigger press to dry firing. Can the importance of good trigger manipulation and sight alignment be over stated? It has allowed me to become very familiar with my firearms. Rarely does a day go by that I do not dry fire a handgun. My Mod. 70 .338 will be dry fired "off hand" a couple of hundred times prior to the annual moose/caribou/bear hunt. I know it helps when the big moment happens. I have snap caps and dummy rounds for most of my guns, they are mostly used for loading drills. Make dry firing part of your "maintaining and improving skills" program.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    I used to wait for the Rosey O'Donnell show to come on TV just so I could dry fire my revolvers pretending I was sending her off to doughnut heaven.
    Tennessee

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    I used to wait for the Rosey O'Donnell show to come on TV just so I could dry fire my revolvers pretending I was sending her off to doughnut heaven.
    .......


  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    I used to wait for the Rosey O'Donnell show to come on TV just so I could dry fire my revolvers pretending I was sending her off to doughnut heaven.
    That'd be enough to make a feller want to pitch his handgun right through the screen!

    Waiting for Rosie to come on rivals waiting for roadkill to turn ripe!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •