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Thread: Favorite campfire foods.....

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    Member MICHoutdoors's Avatar
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    Default Favorite campfire foods.....

    I am Headed up to Alaska in about a month. My Brother and I are renting an RV and plan on fishing, Hiking and exploring the state for 12 days. We will be doing alot of grilling and campfire cooking. I am wondering if any of you are "campfire/grill Gourmets" and would like to share ideas and suggestions for easy to prepare meals that can be cooked over the campfire or on the grill. Obviously we plan on Catching a few fish so any Trout/Salmon/Grayling recipies would be welcomed as well.

    Thanks
    Jeff

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I'm sure others will cover the fish in detail (basically, wrapping any fish in foil with butter, garlic, and onions and the burying in the coals is great), so I figured I'd share something different. Not gourmet, but our favorite is biscuits over the fire. If you have a low flame with hot coals, you can roast the tastiest bicuits you've ever had!




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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Looks good!

    But does anything NOT taste better roasted over a camp fire?

    My favorite would have to be serving after serving of fresh moose backstrap roasted on a stick over a birch fire. Montreal steak seasoning.

    (but watch out for the moose farts the next day).

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    Corn some meat before you leave, or buy a corned roast at the store and prepare it at departure time.. It keeps well due to the dryer salty nature from the brining process. (I use moose eye-of-round roast quite often, due to lack of sinew, etc.)

    Slide some coals from the base of the fire into a small 'U'- shaped gathering of smaller stones, big enough to hold a nice, reasonably deep cast-iron skillet, almost on the coals, but just slightly above them, due to the heighth of the stones. (Note: some river rocks explode with heat, so use your own judgement...)

    Put a healthy amount of canola oil in the skillet, along with a small amount of butter, and place chopped up, pre-cooked potatoes in the piping hot oil (don't put spuds into oil until the skillet is really hot).

    Add a touch of garlic, a minor smidgin of sage, some hot peppers, and black or white pepper, and some chopped up/crumbled corned beef, moose, or ???? (Brown the spuds to mostly done before adding the meat).

    Grate in some carrots and some finely chopped sweet onion, and cook 'til the carrots and onions are fairly tender.

    Scoot the 'hash' to the side of the skillet, preferably over some cooler coals, and 'uphill' slightly from a bit of grease in the vacated side of the skillet, and cook up some eggs to your liking. Voila. Corned hash with eggs a' la campfire. And all made with items that travel fairly well and keep pretty easily. With the exception of eggs, for which there are lots of methods for securing.

    Stews are also good, either made with dried jerky or fresh meats (in that I suspect that your rv has a refrigerator), and like the corned meat, the dried meats keep well, as do the veggies that you'd ordinarily use in the stew; potatoes, onions, carrots, turnips, etc. thicken it or don't.

    A simple biscuit recipe can be used to make dumplings or dodgers to sponge up broth, and can be cooked right on top of the broth, like with chicken and dumplings. you can pre-measure biscuit, pancake, etc. recipes before leaving, and store them in plastic bags, absent the liquids/water/milk (depending on if you're using powdered milk, etc.), and use these for your 'dodgers.'

    Best, in my book, is just eating dried meats or sausages (especially good landjaeger or spicy moose jerky) and traditional king salmon strips cold, next to a fire. They're awesome, and there's no cooking involved. Nice after a long day to just chow down.. But keep plenty of water on hand, and don't over-eat too terribly badly, as they all expand when being digested.

    ruffle

  5. #5

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    We like to make "Wompoms", similar to what Brian is doing in his pictures, but with a twist. Buy a couple cans of biscuits (be sure they're biscuits, not breadsticks, croissants, etc), some instant pudding, whip cream, and canned pie filling (cherry is my favorite). Next, take about a 1" dowel and rub butter on about the end 6" and then carefully roll the biscuit down the dowel about 5 or 6 inches...this is the tricky part, you don't want to make any holes in the biscuit. After you get the biscuit spread out on the dowel, brown it up nice over some coals and after it is done it will slide right off the dowel. Now the fun part...fill the void left by the dowel with whatever concoction you want to make with the pudding, pie filling, etc and enjoy! Gallon ziplock bags work great to mix the pudding and then cut a corner off and squirt it into the cooked biscuit. The only cautions are that these are addicting and they'll give the kids one hell of a sugar buzz!

    An easy meal that we like to make are Hobo Dinners -- just make a hamburger patty and put it on a piece of tinfoil, add come chopped carrots, potatoes, onion, whatever, salt, pepper, butter, etc. Double wrap in tinfoil and throw it in the coals until it's done.

  6. #6
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Apples

    Core out an apple but not all the way through. Place a little brown sugar and raisins in the hole. Wrap up in heavy duty aluminum foil and place in the coals for about 5 minutes.

    A Dutch Oven opens a whole new set of doors. We use to do a lot of Jiffy cakes in the Boy Scouts. Interesting that some fluffed right up and others were pancakes.

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    You can't go wrong making a glaze for your salmon with equal parts of brown sugar or honey and melted butter, pour it over your salmon and put it on a rack over the fire, or if you don't have a rack cut it in pieces and skewer it on a stick.

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    Default lunch meat

    We take lunch meat like roast beef, honey ham, smoked turkey, etc. sliced at the deli for samwiches. Usually on the last night or morning we will take all the left over lunch meat and suatee it with butter. Add in chopped onions, peppers, corn, or whatever you have left. The wife and kids like eggs in it like an omelette. So I take enough for me to make a hoggie and set it aside, make their omelettes and then take my roll and toast it over the fire. I then take the meat and veggies set aside and put on roll with cheese.

  9. #9

    Cool Mountain Pie maker

    Yes I know, probably called something else now. I started using them in early 60's. Clam shell device, handles about two feet. Shells fit a standard slice of white bread. Idea's, butter two slices of white bread, outsides. Put on your ham and cheese, close, insert into coals. Wala, grilled ham and cheese. Maybe pizza on the menu, again with the two slices of bread. Push one into the indent on the shell. Add a couple squirts of pizza sauce, pepperoni, balck olives, maybe a little chopped onion and green pepper, don't forget the cheese and again, what a meal. Ready for desert, again with the two slices of bread, buttered. Couple of tablespoons of canned pie filling, close and you have a good desert, add a little ice cream if handy or maybe some whipped cream from a can. Can also do steak without the bread, just add butter and steak or fish or chicken, maybe a little onion. Can do breakfast with eggs and bacon/hampotato's. Ideas are up to you. Over the last 45 years I have tried many. They used to be cast iron, now are aluminum. Can get them at most RV stores.

  10. #10
    Member MICHoutdoors's Avatar
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    Thanks so much for all the suggestions. I will definitely try out a few dishes that you guys have suggested. Edd - Yeah I have one of those pie makers you are speaking of. I think it is called a "hobo pie maker" and my is of the cast iron variety. They work well. Maybe I will pick up one or two from the RV rental place. we will see.

    Again. Thanks for all the suggestions. If anyone has any trout recipies I would love to hear about them.. especially the easy ones. I have heard once or twice somplace that a good way to cook trout is to clean the trout (head and guts), fill the body cavity with onions, butter etc and wrap the fish in wet newspaper and throw it on the grill. When the fish is done the newspaper will be flaky and dry. (I have never tried to cook trout this way but something makes me think the ink from the newspaper would contaminate the fish... Not sure.

    Thanks
    Jeff

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    I sure would be very concerned about the ink (and other chemicals) in the charred newspaper. Better to use foil. But of course foil is not something you can just dispose of in the campfire and has to be hauled out.

    Grandma Lori
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    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
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    I've always been fond of oysters at the campfire. Just throw em on the coals until they pop...little bitta hot sauce...now that's camping!

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Not gourmet, but our favorite is biscuits over the fire. If you have a low flame with hot coals, you can roast the tastiest bicuits you've ever had!

    Bread. The test of all is the making of good bread without utensils. Some make a hole in the ground for a bread pan and line it with a corner of a mackintosh. But most old timers use the top of the flour in the sack itself. Simply spread the mouth wide open and securely level and proceed as though it were a pan.

    To make a small loaf of bread, put a teaspoonful of baking powder on about a pint of flour, add a lump of butter or grease as big as a walnut and a dash of salt. Mix them together, then add about a cupful of cold water, work it into the flour that has been prepared. It will not strike into the flour below. Thoroughly work up the mass of dough and now it is ready for treatment as bread twist, or as cakes.

    Bread Twist. Cut a smooth, round stick two or three inches through and three feet long, point one end, drive it in the ground leaning toward the fire at a place just a little hotter than you can hold your hand. Work the dough into a long roll and twist it like a vine around the stick. After ten minutes, turn the stick around in the hole, so as to give the full heat to the other side, and so on; in half an hour, the bread should be brown and finished.

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    Member JustinW's Avatar
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    You mught try investing in a dutch oven to cook with over the fire, you can make all sorts of really cool stuff in it. Camped last weekend and really spoiled ourselves, made a pineapple upsidedown cake, roasted some cornish game hens, made a cherry cobbler and biscuits too. All really simple stuff, just have to have hot coals and some practice. Dutch oven recipes are all over the internet for just about any food you can imagine.

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    Default You guys are killing me.

    I just got back from a bear hunt a few days ago where we subsided on cup o noodle, instant oatmeal, and pbj. Well, and some bear on a stick the last day. Needless to say, I did not provision the trip.
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Grandma View Post
    I sure would be very concerned about the ink (and other chemicals) in the charred newspaper. Better to use foil. But of course foil is not something you can just dispose of in the campfire and has to be hauled out.

    Grandma Lori
    FYI- most all black and white newsprint is made with soy based ink. Completely safe and non toxic.

  17. #17

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    Take a wire basket campfire cooker with for doing fish fillets, burgers, steaks, potatoes, toast, shrimp and crab. They are very versatile. I like the brown sugar apples, they are a favorite. I also make homemade berry jam camping every year with fire-roasted toast. CAMPFIRE COOKING ALWAYS TASTES BETTER!!!

  18. #18

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    Only 2 things I need are Meat(any kind) and smores!! Not saying thats all I eat but our must have if I am around a fire.

  19. #19
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    With truck camping you can go all out definitely get a dutch oven, you can do everything from pot roast too cake in them.

    Edd we called them Hobo pies (also a Michigander) but thanks for an wonderful blast from the past! One of my personal favorites as well.

    Brian M
    We did a variation on your biscuits wrap that dough around a hot dog my friend!

    Skookumchuck
    Dude any shellfish is better cooked in the hots!

    One of my favorites was a beach bake, never herd of this till I moved to California, briefly. Dig a hole and line it with rocks. Pile brush into the hole and have a nice mourning/early afternoon fire. Around 2 or 3 in the afternoon let the fire die and cover the coals with sea weed, then a layer of fish. More sea weed and say some crab and or shell fish. cover with more sea weed and let the whole thing sit till around 7 or 8 pm. Carefully remove the layers of sea weed and enjoy. Kinda like the steamer version of a dutch oven.
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  20. #20

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    Favorite Campfire Foods?

    Well that depends on where yer campfire is? 15 miles back into the mountains... fresh trout on a stick over open fire and coals. Sprinkle some cajun spice and garlic first in the cavity, cook, then remove skin, flake meat of the bones, then sprinkle a little more cajun spice and garlic.

    or...

    after a fresh game kill, back strap ka bob on a stick with spices of choice, in my case, garlic and lemon pepper (you can keep yer liver and onions) heart ka bob for breakfast.

    Now, if you are driving up to yer fire ring, then the door is wide open

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