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Thread: High thrust or regular kicker outboard?

  1. #1
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    Default High thrust or regular kicker outboard?

    I'm studing buying a 9.9 hp kicker to put on my 20' Wooldrige XTra Plus outboard jet boat. I've about decided on a 25" extra long shaft to get around all the mounting bracket issues.

    I note that some models like Yamaha only make the 25" shaft motors in the high thrust configuration while others like Tohatsu don't offer a high thrust option in the 25" model.

    Do I need a high thrust motor for my boat since it is relatively light and has minimum drag with the flat bottom? I would assume the high thrust units would be good for boats with a fair amount of hull under the water or is this a bad assumption? I also assume you could get around some of the thrust issues to a degree with a different pitch prop but I'm not certain if this applies to my boat or not.

    All help and advice will be appreciated!
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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  2. #2
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    Default

    Do you need a high thrust model? Nope.
    Are they a better choice? Yes!

    The high thrust kickers are designed from the ground up to move heavy loads at slow speeds. They have different gear boxes and turn bigger props to do this.
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    For a dedicated kicker, they are the way to go for the reasons stated. They will push rediculously heavy boats with minimal horse power. But, no kicker will get you on plane, so most any nominal 8-10 horse kicker will give you similar performance. If you plan to do alot of trolling, I'd definately invest in a high torque.

    On the flip side, if you'd ever plan on using a kicker to power a dinghy, the older light weight short shaft two stroke motors are the way to go. The 4 strokes are heavy which greatly increases the odds of one becoming an anchor during a switchover, and the gearing and prop make them a poor choice for powering an inflatable. But the downside of the two strokes is you need seperate tank to carry the pre-mix.

    Decisions decisions.

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