Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Freezing Roe?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    29

    Default Freezing Roe?

    I just got six stitches on the middle finger of my cranking hand and am unable to fish until the stitches come out in a couple weeks. I've got a big jar of roe and don't want it to go to waste. Should I freeze it- or will it be OK sitting in the fridge that long? I just started fishing with roe last week and know next to nothing about it other than the smell is tough to get off the hands.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    3,213

    Default

    You can use some Pro Cure on it to preserve it and either leave it in the fridge or freeze it. Either way will work. When I lived on Lake Ontario I used to cure and freeze my roe all the time. If freezing for extended time put the roe in the freezer until it's partially frozen and then vaccume pack it. It will last for years. The partial freezing stops the vaccume sealing from breaking eggs. If you don't cure it it will not last more than a couple of weeks in the fridge. You can get a couple of months max by curing it.

  3. #3
    Member FishSean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    118

    Default >>>---------->

    Just keep it in a Carrs grocery bag in your trunk,it should be fine.

  4. #4
    Member RMiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    1,736

    Default

    That is why I use shrimp for bait instead of eggs. Not hardly any mess at all.

    --

    I dont think there would be any problem with freezing the eggs.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  5. #5

    Default

    Freezing will more often then not will make a mess out of your eggs. When you freeze them the fluid expants and breaks the membrain of the individual egg. This turns them into goo. If you cure them correctly you can keep them refrigerated for several months and not have this problem. Google egg cures on the web and you will get some really good curing ideas or as stated earlier, get a store bought cure and use it.

  6. #6

    Default sure

    Quote Originally Posted by graeme View Post
    I just got six stitches on the middle finger of my cranking hand and am unable to fish until the stitches come out in a couple weeks. I've got a big jar of roe and don't want it to go to waste. Should I freeze it- or will it be OK sitting in the fridge that long? I just started fishing with roe last week and know next to nothing about it other than the smell is tough to get off the hands.
    Thanks.
    I've kept roe in the freezer up to three years, cured and uncured, with no problems. If anything, it seems a little tougher and stays on the hook better after freezing for a year or two, though it will tend to brown a little in color unless it's been cured before freezing.

    Throw it in the freezer, relax, and heel up. It'll be waiting for you when you are ready for it.

  7. #7
    Member Jessals Fishing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Sterling, AK
    Posts
    15

    Default

    when fishing salmon, I have to keep a reserve of eggs in the freezer to use in the spring till I get back stocked. I only problem is that they will "milk out" faster, meening they start turning white. So if I am bringing frozen eggs, I make sure to bring more than I normally would. But if you think it's gonna be a couple of weeks, I would keep them frozen to preserve them.
    Fishing is one part skill too two parts luck!

  8. #8
    Member Big Al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Palmer,Alaska
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    For that wonderful "O'dear" smell on your fingers, lemon or lime juice works great.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  9. #9
    Member Anglette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Houston, AK
    Posts
    229

    Default

    Pro cure it over night, then put it in a gallon zip lock baggy with it 1/3 filled with Borax, YES BORAX. You will surprised how good that stuff works when curing eggs!

    Terri

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Thank you all. I leave for St. Louis Wed (hope to do some bass fishing in 90 degree heat while there) and have too much to do before then to spend time learning how to cure eggs. I'll just chuck them into the freezer and do the best I can with however it thaws out. My stitches come out a few days after I return, so I'm hoping the chinook will be gracing us with their presence by then.
    Thanks again. Don't know what I'd do without this forum sometimes. Catch less fish and look like an idiot in the process, that's for sure.

  11. #11
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,033

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglette View Post
    Pro cure it over night, then put it in a gallon zip lock baggy with it 1/3 filled with Borax, YES BORAX. You will surprised how good that stuff works when curing eggs!

    Terri
    I've used Borax since the early 70's. I put the eggs on newspaper and cut the skeins into hook size bites. I take the Borax (Not Boraxo) and add a little salt and then work it in-between the rows, mix it well and usually let it dry overnight and then ziplock and freeze.

    I have never had a problem with the eggs breaking down when they thaw.

    kingfisherktn

  12. #12

    Default

    I procured mine from june king season in years past and what I had left over I'd vaccum seal (without crushing the eggs but gettting MOST of the air out...also add a paper towel in the bag to keep from sucking all the juices up into your motor) and keep them all winter.

    They worked very well a year later with no ill effects. Atleast good enough to start the season with.

    How to cure eggs? There is a good book on it. figure out what you need in eggs. Some guys like them hard, some like them soft and juicy. I like them a rubbery but still milk well. The rivers you fish will dictate a lot of how you cure your eggs. Milky eggs in fast rivers will milk out really fast. Hard eggs on slower rivers will last forever however I dont feel they get enough scent in the water.

    Typically put mine in a glass jar...flipped it once or a couple times if I remember . After it sucked the juices back in I'd lay them out on a paper towel for a little bit depending on temp and wind. Dont let them dry out or it's a booger getting the m off the paper. A piece of plexi glass works well for this and cleans up easy. Worked well on the gulkana and valley streams in years past.

    at a minimum follow the directions on the bottle of pro cure or pro glo and you'll be fine.

    Lots of ways to skin a cat here, you'll find one that fits your needs either ont he boards or in that book.

  13. #13
    Member Zissou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    What about my dynamite?
    Posts
    74

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    For that wonderful "O'dear" smell on your fingers, lemon or lime juice works great.
    I use toothpaste. Works great for any smell I've encountered!

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    homer
    Posts
    42

    Default cures

    procure, borax, a little jello for varied color, even a little cornmeal in with the borax, I've used all with good success. Frozen then thawed and cured, cured then frozen, fresh cured and used, its all good. Only thing I can say for sure is to use scissors to cut them up. A knife pops alot of eggs. Whereas scissors wedge between the eggs when cutting into chunks. Less goo and mess.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •