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Thread: Finally, more details; filet method

  1. #1

    Default Finally, more details; filet method

    OK folks, many of you have been waiting for more detail of a filet method I posted earlier this year:

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanfishguides View Post
    First, take the big, beefy knife and remove the dorsal, anal, and caudal fins (all except for the tail) by cutting from the tail toward the head. Next, remove the head by following the gill plate, cutting from the dorsum (top) downward through the spine. Next make an incision down the belly to remove the guts.

    Now, take your fine point filet knife, starting at the exposed vertebra at the head, and cut along the lower ribs (gravity will pull the filet away from your work, you should be able to watch your blade through the ribs). Continue this to the anal fin. Turn the fish over, lift the filet and make a perpendicular cut along the vertebrae and allow the filet knife to follow the spinus processes toward the dorsum (those are the bones on the top of the spine). Continue this all the way to the tail. After removing the first filet, while the second filet is still on the bottom, repeat the process starting with the ribs.

    I used this method on kings, reds and silvers (even a small dolly!) and found it to work exceptionally well. Two of us filleted 50 reds in about 1.5-2 hours (maybe less).
    As I described before, this is a method that I learned from an Alaskan Native. While it is not the fastest method, it is very effective and efficient and salvages the most meat of any other method that have seen.

    So, with apologies and due respect, I think the best way to post this is by pointing you to http://www.alaskanfishguides.com/ind...a-fishing-news

    As a primer, however, here are the before and after images:




  2. #2
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for sharing.

    I do my fillets completely different but end result is exactly the same.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  3. #3

    Default Excellent

    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    Thanks for sharing.

    I do my fillets completely different but end result is exactly the same.
    I am all about being good stewards of the resource. This certainly isn't the only way. So, please share your technique also...

    My hope is to see fish skeletons being washed downstream instead of a fleshy carcass... no matter what technique a person uses.

  4. #4
    Member Anglette's Avatar
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    Default

    Any of you, that have fished on Southern California, and have filetted a yellowtail, the procedure is pretty much the same, Gill Plate, belly, along the backbone (like a halibut). At least that is way I do it.

    I am going try using a ULU knife this year. That would Pretty inpressive If it works good.

    Terri

  5. #5
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    Default pieces

    I'm not sure who posted this method, I think it was fishinphysician, but there was a method where you get each fillet off in about 7 peices and there wasn't enough meat left to use the carcass as crab bait. I tried it on one fish last year and it worked really well. Unless you are looking to get a whole fillet this method got me pretty good meal size portions for the freezer. A guy I knew used to save the carcass with the little bit of meat left on it and bake it when he got home and just pick the extra meat off with a fork. That was usually his meal the day he caught the fish. Either way, any method that yields the most amount of the fish is definately preferable. I recently educated my friend on how tasty the belly meat can be. We went out crabbing and i asked what he had for bait. He had a bag full of belly strips that he had taken off of his sockeye so they would vaccum pack better. I couldn't believe it. So the next fish I caught I cooked up a piece of belly meat and he was amazed. As far as I'm concerned that's the best part of the fish.

  6. #6
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    Default I gotta try this

    Maybe I'm just a little slow. Can you explain the part about using the fine point fillet knife along the lower ribs. I'm having a little trouble orienting myself to the pic on the link.

  7. #7
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default carcass

    off of a halibutt, king, silver, or even a red can make a fine meal....never overlook the carcass as a fresh dinner when you get home.

  8. #8

    Default Sorry for the vagueness

    Quote Originally Posted by roknjs View Post
    Maybe I'm just a little slow. Can you explain the part about using the fine point fillet knife along the lower ribs. I'm having a little trouble orienting myself to the pic on the link.
    What I do in this situation is to insert the filet knife right under the rib cage, where you can see the knife through the ribs and follow the ribs toward the belly with your knife, thus peeling the ribs away from the filet. Hope that helps.

    fNp also has an awesome method, and frankly, I cut the filet into dinner sized sections at home anyhow.

    Again, this isn't the only way, just another way to salvage as much meat as possible from the fish.

  9. #9
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    Default take the carcass home,

    Scrape the meat off of the bones with a fork and you have a good amount of tartare, or the fixings for cakes or patties or croquettes or chowder (make stock with the bones) or spicy salmon or halibut sushi maki....
    Matt Drayton, Chef de Cuisine
    Captain Steve's Fishing Lodge
    www.captainstevesfishinglodge.com

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