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Thread: What to buy?

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default What to buy?

    I have G.A.S. (aka- Gear Aquistion Syndrome), I am getting the bug to buy some halibut gear and trying to decide what to get....
    I live in the interior and will hopefully be able to go a couple of times a year. Dont need the best, but dont want to buy junk either, I am looking at 4 setups, so what kinda rod, reel and line should I use? Dacron or the synthetic type? (supplex?)
    We plan on fishing Homer over the 4th, but will be going to Valdez or Whittier as well.
    Thanks..........

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    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default lamiglas rods

    are good and not too expensive. i have the 5 foot 6, 50 to 100 pound and i bought my girlfriend a 4 foot 6 lighter rod that i actually like. has more sensitivity at the tip and still lots of backbone. for reels the penn 114 will fit the bill and i would go with a braided line so that you can fish deeper without the currents making you use pounds of weight to get down to the bottom. back it with a dacron and then finish off with 300 yards of good braided line.

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    Default

    Agree. Lamiglas is the way to go and if you do some good searching (i.e. EBAY) you can probably get a really good deal. I got mine off there about a year ago for $55 (6' 80-120lb) brand new. Matched it with a Penn 114HL and have never lost a but' since. Good quality and lower price. Dont be afraid of the used, but well maintained Penn reels. They are stout and can always be brought back to new.

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    Default

    hey if you don't mind buying from private users online check bloodydecks.com lots of good gear and I sent you a p.m. on some set ups if you are interested

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the great info, I was in sportmans today looking at the 4-6 lamiglas rode for 90 bucks, I looked at the Penn reels as well, the 114 is HUGE... needing that may be wishfull thinking on my part.????
    I am thinking a 113 would work ok? especially with braided line, And Oh, any suggestions on which braided line to buy?
    Thanks

  6. #6

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    I think I will buy one.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    My personal thought on but rods if you're looking to get 4 is get two boat rods for fishing bait, and two jigging rods that will also double for salmon rods. I have a couple of 5 1/2' boat rods, one lamiglas and one penn, they are both pretty decent rods for under $100, and have nice aluminum reel seats. I've been wanting to try one of the 4 1/2' rods, figuring it would be easier for the kids and my wife to handle. I'd advise against roller guides as they will corrode out in time, and the braided lines can cut into them. For reels, I've used the penn 113 4/0 high speed and it's a decent reel for the money. I just got a shimano tld 20 which is a similar sized lever drag reel for a couple more bucks, and prefer it over the penn senators. I can't see any reason to run a 114 6/0 unless you just want to tire yourself out.

    As for line, I've used 50 and 80 pound braided, I'll back the reel with 80# dacron and top it off with 300yds of braided. When the tide starts to move you'll appreciate the ability to stay on bottom, as well as the sensitivity. The downside is the lack of stretch puts more strain on the rod and reel drag.

    For jigging rods, seeker alaskan series is a nice rod, but not cheap, or the shimano trevalo butterfly rods. They do have the backbone to handle a heavy fish, but also a fairly sensitive tip. They can handle anything from a couple ounce herring style or butterfly jig to a 24oz lead head. I'd stick with 300 yds of 50# braided, the rod will take a bit of the strain and the thinner line will allow you to run lighter jigs. For a reel the tld 15 or 20, or if you want to plunk down some coin, a 2 speed shimano or avet is the ticket.

    On my jigging setup I run an 18" 300# mono line with a barrel swivel and 10/0 stinger hook w/ a hootchie where it ties to the main line, then a corkscrew swivel on the other end for quick changes of the jigs. The stinger hook has accounted for quite a few rock fish and even nabbed a silver once. I'll often put a postage stamp sized bit of herring on the hook to sweeten it up

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks again for the info, concerning line: is braided line made from spectra fibre? so is braided and spectra samo/samo? I have read/heard some reels are more senistive to braided line?
    Is this when you would make a choice between a level wind such as Penn GT or a Penn Senator? Am I correct that the thinner braided line will push through the underlying layers unless you manually level the line? Honestly I have fished for Halibut before, I just never paid much attention to the equipment, someone just put the rod in my hand and so "go fish".
    I got to admit I dont know the diffrence between a boat rod and a jigging rod???
    Im learning.......Maynot be space here to get me properly educated!!!!!
    Learn by doing is best, I just dont want to waste $$, especially if I PU 4 setups.

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Braided/spectre same/same. The key with the braided lines is you need to put them onto the reel under tension, or they will dig in and cause a serious problem. I like to drop down a 3# sinker and reel it in to get a good pack. None of my reels are level winds, the braided line can cut into the level wind mechanism, and level winds have a tendency to give out under the loads of halibut fishing.

    As far as boat rods vs jigging. The boat rods are the traditional short/stiff pool cue looking rods that provide great leverage for pulling the buts off the bottom. The problem is they are quite heavy and you'll wear yourself out jigging with them. The jigging rods look more like a salmon rod, about 7' long and most folks would expect them to just snap like a toothpick. But I've seen them pull up suprisingly large fish, just make sure you invest in a good rod as it'll hold up.

    Personally I greatly prefer jigging to fishing bait. You never have to reel up to check bait, as the setup keeps fishing so long as you jig.

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