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Thread: What flies for Grayling?

  1. #1
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Default What flies for Grayling?

    Got a good selection of dry and wet trout flies but want to target some Grayling. What flies work well? Also is there a fishable population of graling on the parks highway streams?

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Bead head nymphs and such.

    Normally little stuff might be used for grayling but make sure to try some larger flies like a sculpin or muddler too. I have caught some nice grayling on sculpins.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  3. #3

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    bead head prince nymphs
    as for parks streams, yes, people on this form have noted but I have not traveled that way myself.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Mosquito patterns...

    Another vote for beadhead Prince Nymphs. I carry #8, #10, and a couple #12 for grayling -

    If you get some calm water - try some dry flies. Mosquito patterns, gnat patterns. Some like Parachute Adams in #12 or 14 too. They were sold out at Mtn View last week.

    One day last year, nothing much would bite until we switched to anything buggy, black with a bit of red.

  5. #5

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    I have fly fished the Parks Hiway streams for 30 some years now and I have to agree with the beadhead prince nymphs as a very productive fly. You might want to round out your fly box with a few zug-bugs, pheasent tain nymphs, gold ribbed hares ears, and for drys, griffiths gnats, black gnats, and caddis flies. Of course you should throw in a few others just for a variation, but these are the "cream of the crop". Grayling just can't resist a hook with some feathers or fur tied to them! Love those fish!

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    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Fished sheep today and come up on some grayling messing around on the surface. I threw everything but the kitchen sink at them and no takers. Pheasant tail, mosquito, prince, knat, eggs, everything I had and no takes. I got pissed they wouldn't bite so I left. Saw some good size ones, but they jsut wouldn't bite. I'm pretty new to the whole fly fishing thing so it was prolly my presentation. Will have to try again soon.

  7. #7

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    usually if you aint getting bites you have drag issues or you're to big.

    Grayling you dont need small

    drys don't bother with anything smaller then 16's

    nymphs same but I generally use 14's.

    I carry 5 flies for grayling and use 2 of them most of the time.

    For dries
    griffths gnat size 16
    elk hair caddis (troth style) size 16 and 14's all in green bodys
    white parachute in 16

    nymphs beadheads:
    pheasant tail 14
    pearl scud 14

    Early season or early early in they day, stick with the the nymphs

    Once they start on top, I go to a griffths gnat. If you get refusals go to the white parachute. Almost always fish the griffths or the caddis....pretty rare from here on out I bother with nymphs. No point really, get the drag free drift, they WILL come up for it.

    The big key with grayling is drag free. Learn it, live it! Drag can be good every now and then, say with a caddis skated or a griffths waked...but generally speaking no drag catchs you fish day in and day out consistently with them. And you'll do very well. The white parachute is for days they've been gone over or they are refusing (which is extremely rare) the griffths or caddis. I'm lucky if I have 1 or 2 parachutes in my box at any given time. They work and work well when nothing else will. The griffths works for me 90% of the time, everywhere it's seen water that grayling live in.

  8. #8
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    By drag free you mean chuck it out there and left it drift past them with no strips? What angle would you take on them? Downstream and throw up to them or can you get away with horizontal? I'll have to stop and get some more flies but I threw all of those patters at them, except for the scud, and they wouldn't take. Like I said it was prolly my presention. Do you use a strike indicator? I know you wouldn't need one for dry flies but would you use one with the wets?

  9. #9

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    Replied to your pm...sorry trying to move out and leave for sitka at the same time. On the road yet tonight I hope.

    Forgot to mention in the PM. You can also high stick a dry fly to achieve drag free drifts. Look up high sticking. Generally it's used for nymping. by dropping the rod as the fly goes by before the line starts to pull you're essentially throwing more line to the cast by doing nothing but lowering the rod. It helps at time to keep the line off the water when currents are screwy.

    Reach casts, pile casts and curve casts can all come in handy but generally you dont need to know or use them. If I learned one other then just a regular cast it would be a pile cast.

    Good luck this summer

    Dan

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