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Thread: Fiberglass supplies in Juneau.

  1. #1

    Default Fiberglass supplies in Juneau.

    I got myself into a major winter project this year. I got a 1971 Fiberform runabout that I thought was a great deal. After poking around, it looks like I will be replacing the transom, floor, maybe a stringer or two, and moving the fuel tank under the deck. Needless to say I am going to have to fiind a descent place to pick up fiberglass supplies. Anyone have any reccomendations of places in Juneau to get mat, poly resin, ect?

  2. #2
    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    Western Auto carries some fiberglass repair stuff. You might also call the Boat Doctor and see if they can give you any ideas.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chauvotsm View Post
    I got myself into a major winter project this year. I got a 1971 Fiberform runabout that I thought was a great deal. After poking around, it looks like I will be replacing the transom, floor, maybe a stringer or two, and moving the fuel tank under the deck. Needless to say I am going to have to fiind a descent place to pick up fiberglass supplies. Anyone have any reccomendations of places in Juneau to get mat, poly resin, ect?
    Western Auto has some basic supplies. I know they have the mat, resin ,etc. Also, check out that plumbing store downtown, by Blockbuster. Can't remember the name, but they sell a lot of boating and boat repair supplies.

  4. #4
    Member smtdvm's Avatar
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    Harri's Plumbing and Marine seems to have better prices than others around town.

  5. #5

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    Thanks guys. I'll look around. If I do what I'm hoping for, I will need some bulk supplies. Hopefully I won't need to ship it in.

  6. #6

    Default Fiberglass

    There are 2 two types of resin for fiberglass, Polyester and Epoxy.
    The polyester is the cheapest and least forgiving resin with a work time of 20-45 minutes. It dries tacky and that is so the next coat will bond to the first. If you want the last coat to dry hard and not be tacky you have to add a wax addative. This wax has to be sanded off the surface to allow paint to stick.
    The epoxy resin is available in 2-3 viscosities and can be the consistancy of elmers glue to J-B weld. It has a work time of 40 mins-1 1/2 hrs. It dries hard and is 4 to 5 times stronger than the polyester version. It is also a little more brittle.
    Fiberglass resins are easily applied with a 4-6 inch foam paint roller and foam brushes will work as well,for large areas use a squeegy to level out.
    When you go to obtain resin be sure and get a NON-BLUSHING formula.
    When fiberglass blushes it leaves an oily film on the dry surface which must be cleaned and sanded so the next coat will stick, this is time consuming.
    When working with fiberglass resin, put a quart of white vinegar in a plastic 3 lb coffee can and use it to wash the sticky stuff off. It works very good and isn't as hard on the hands as acetone, just leaves a lite vinegar smell. It is however a lot cheaper than acetone.
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  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The best place to get fiberglass cloth, matte, roving tools et al is Fiberglass Inc in Washington state. Great folks to deal with, great prices, and shipping via USPS is pretty reasonable. I don't mind paying a bit more for local shops, but when they charge double, I take my business elsewhere.

    One additional note regarding polyester and epoxy resins is polyester resin will only stick to polyester, epoxy will stick to both. That said, if you have a boat that was built with polyester, stick with polyester. Working times with the resins is highly dependent on temperatures. You want at least 60F throughout the cure time, but every time the temp rises 10 deg, you have 1/2 the time to work with the resin before it kicks off.

    One disadvantage of polyester is that after it cures the catylist evaporates, and this provides a microscopic honeycomb structure. No problem for straight glass, but when the glass is applied to wood, that honeycomb allows just enough moisture through to allow the wood to swell and delaminate the glass over time. Epoxy is far superior when it comes to applying glass to wood.

  8. #8
    Member kioti's Avatar
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    Default glass cloth

    I have one new roll (whole roll) of 10.8 ounce Hexcel Top grade

    will let go for reasonable price? it's over 108 yrds.........

    p

  9. #9

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    May not need it after all. I found out that the military won't pay to have it shipped back to the lower 48. No point in putting alot of work into a boat I can't keep. If something changes kioti, I'll hit you up. I need to call and confirm the word I got is correct.

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