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Thread: Mounting a Kicker

  1. #1
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Mounting a Kicker

    I am looking at an old merc 9.9 to use temporarily as a kicker for my 17.5 wooldridge. It is a long shaft with tiller controls. What is involved with mounting it? For now I think I will just toss it in the boat and clamp it on if needed. I would like to mount it properly though in the near future.

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    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure you'll need to get a lowering bracket to allow the prop to get down into fresh water. Running it with the prop behind the transom won't work very well, as the prop isn't biting into new water.
    Been out in the Wooldridge yet?

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    I have a Woldridge 17.5 that I put a kicker on at times it is a Suzuki 9.9 that I think is a long shaft(not a 15 inch) that I mount on the back of the boat and the prop goes below the bottom of the boat. It will push the boat up the Yukon. Just tried it to see if would work. When I bought the motor they said to bolt it to the boat to keep it from walking off. I did not want to drill a hole in the boat and the spot that the bolt holes ended up where right on a seem. If I have the motor on (which in not all that often) I use a cable and lock it to the boat. The motor weighs almost 100lbs so if I can save the weight I do not take the motor.

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    Member kammer's Avatar
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    Default The thing to remember.

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I am looking at an old merc 9.9 to use temporarily as a kicker for my 17.5 wooldridge. It is a long shaft with tiller controls. What is involved with mounting it? For now I think I will just toss it in the boat and clamp it on if needed. I would like to mount it properly though in the near future.
    Depending on how your transom is configured, a lowering bracket is advisable. It would allow the kicker to be raised completely out of the water and lower it to the ideal position when needed. However you mount it, the thing to remember is, when you are ready to use it, the cavitation plate on the kicker needs to be even with the bottom of the transom. This will place the prop in the ideal location in reference to your hull line to reduce cavitation. If you look at any boat with an outboard for outdrive, when trimmed down, you will see the cavitation plate at the bottom of the transom. Good luck.
    Kammer
    22' Seasport

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Soooo, I guess I need one of these...


    That stinks, I have $75 in the motor and am banking on another 25 to rebuild the carb. Another $50 in the tank and fuel line components and now I am looking at more than doubling the cost in order to hang the darn thing in the right position on the boat. Anyone know a "budget" way to accomplish this? Or at least a place to get an inexpensive lowering bracket?

  6. #6
    Member fishnngrinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Soooo, I guess I need one of these...


    That stinks, I have $75 in the motor and am banking on another 25 to rebuild the carb. Another $50 in the tank and fuel line components and now I am looking at more than doubling the cost in order to hang the darn thing in the right position on the boat. Anyone know a "budget" way to accomplish this? Or at least a place to get an inexpensive lowering bracket?
    Yep, one of those. I had similar experience with the costs. Keep a close watch on the sell/trade forum and on Craigslist. Brackets do show up and they go fast. I spent more than I wanted, but got a good one. The bracket extends your motor back from the transom, so you have 1-3 in of water coming up behind-allows for the motor to be mounted a little higher than having the cavitation plate flush with the bottom of the boat. Safe boating.
    NRA Lifetime Member

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    Member fishnngrinn's Avatar
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    One more thought! To save money I was thinking of building a fixed bracket, but a friend told me that he had one mounted this way, but even with the motor tilted it got a lot of spray. It eventually seized up from the salt water corrosion. It is important to raise the motor up out of the water sufficiently to avoid this.
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  8. #8
    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
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    You said the motor's a long shaft, right? Do you have any kind of kicker mount at all on the boat now? If not, you can get a fixed mount and attach it at the right level, then tilt the kicker up when you're not using it and take it off when you're trailering.

    Is there room to clamp it right on tho the transom? If so, is the cavitation plate near the bottom of the boat when you do that?

    Might not really have an immediate expensive issue; although in the future you might want to set up the lowering bracket.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Soooo, I guess I need one of these...


    That stinks, I have $75 in the motor and am banking on another 25 to rebuild the carb. Another $50 in the tank and fuel line components and now I am looking at more than doubling the cost in order to hang the darn thing in the right position on the boat. Anyone know a "budget" way to accomplish this? Or at least a place to get an inexpensive lowering bracket?
    Looks like this bracket runs $180 at W. Marine.
    I had this bracket on my boat and hung a ~110 lb. 18 hp kicker on it. After several seasons (and being in some rough water), the tabs where they bolted to the transom bent slightly. Not enough to where anything was going to fail or fall off or whatever. I talked to Garelick about it and got a great deal on the beefiest bracket they sell and so I put that one on instead.

    To make a long story short, I still have the other bracket in my garage. If you want it I'll let it go for $90. That'll get me 45 miles in my boat

    Send me a PM if you want it or need more information on it.

  10. #10
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    Default Kicker options

    Going through the same questions with my Wooldridge XtraPlus.

    To mount it on the transom without a bracket you need an extra long 25" shaft motor- normal short shafts are 15" and long shafts are 20". The measurement is from the inside top of the mounting clamp to the cavitation plate which should be even with the bottom of the boat.

    I don't read a lot of good experiences with the moveable brackets. As was mentioned the motor so mounted down low into the spray and then the tiller is way low also. I haven't found a 25" shaft motor larger than 9.9 hp; if you need one larger you are stuck with using a bracket.

    If you spring for a 25" shaft motor you can mount it normally on the transom and have the tiller in the right position - or use remote controls -if you desire. You can also get a 4 stroke and use the boat for dip netting on the Kenai. Dip netting was one of the requirements for my kicker.

    Bad news is the cost of a new 25" shaft 4 stroke - cheapest I have found is around $2200 for a 9.8 hp Tohatsu / Nissan. I haven't priced the Yamaha or Honda yet- I'll probably croak of sticker shock! On the other hand the Tohatsus have a good reputation and they make the samll motors for Mercuty and OMC I believe.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by kammer View Post
    ...the thing to remember is, when you are ready to use it, the cavitation plate on the kicker needs to be even with the bottom of the transom. This will place the prop in the ideal location in reference to your hull line to reduce cavitation. If you look at any boat with an outboard for outdrive, when trimmed down, you will see the cavitation plate at the bottom of the transom. Good luck.
    However you've seen motors mounted, I would recommend positioning the anti-cavitation plate about an inch BELOW the bottom of the boat, to avoid the natural cavitation that is released at the aft end.

  12. #12
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    I am planning on a kicker motor on my 20 foot riverboat as well, with a bracket that moves the motor back does the cav plate need to be even with the bottom?
    I know the kicker will never get the boat on step?

  13. #13

    Default Kicker mount.

    From what i understand, if your kicker is not going to be enough to get your boat on plane, the cavitation plate should be at water line height when boat is in water. May need to be a little lower though if your running in a place that there is enough chop to raise the prop out of water though. If im mistaken please corret me.

  14. #14
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    Since I built my own boat, I built the kicker mount as well. Partly to save some $ over the commercial units, but I've also found it really handy for changing props, and it would also aid in getting in the boat if God forbid I go for an unplanned water exit.


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