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Thread: Ruger M77/50

  1. #1

    Default Ruger M77/50

    I'm looking to possibly pick one of these up on the used/consignment market to get into muzzleloading. Any opinions on quality, accuracy, durability anyone could pass along?

  2. #2

    Default almost

    Quote Originally Posted by brasebear View Post
    I'm looking to possibly pick one of these up on the used/consignment market to get into muzzleloading. Any opinions on quality, accuracy, durability anyone could pass along?

    I don't own, but have shot with a couple of friends who have them. Both are as accurate as any I've seen and appear trouble free. I've seriously considered picking one up, but keep finding something "more important" to buy. If my interest ran more to modern styles than traditional, I think the Ruger would be first on my list for hunting.

  3. #3

    Default

    BrownBear,

    Thanks for the info, much appreciated. I've had great success over the years with Ruger centerfire stuff, and when I saw that they made a ML I was pretty excited, and have even chased a few down. Too bad it seemed to be a limited run/production, seems like they were discontinued around 2004 sometime.

    If looking at a used/consignment ML, what sort of things should I be on the lookout for in terms of wear, care, etc -- that are different from a centerfire rifle? One that I saw firsthand appeared as though it hadn't been cleaned (barrel seemed to have a bit of goo in the muzzle), but it was tagged as "new with box". Could it be some residue from mfg, or that someone hadn't cleaned it after shooting it a time or two?

  4. #4

    Default

    Most traditional muzzleloaders are shipped with some kind of bore protectant in them, so it wouldn't surprise me if the Ruger came that way, too. Lyman puts some kind of goo in their Great Plains Rifle that's a real dickens to get out. I've picked up a couple of new Knights on trades that came with clean bores, but that may be Knight's thing.

    If I was buying one, I'd insist on pulling the breech plug (not a big deal with the wrench provided along with the rifle, and in fact a normal part of cleaning an inline), so I could inspect the bore directly. If there's goo there, ask if you can run a patch or two down the bore for a better look. If the bore looked good and there were no obvious defects in the remainder of the rifle, I'd buy it.

    I'm with you on Rugers in general, and that's what attracted me to their inlines. I'm having so much fun shooting a cheap black powder revolver these days that I'm now thinking of picking up one that has lots more oomph. Mine won't handle heavy loads, but the Ruger Old Army is a tank in terms of pressures it will stand and velocities it will turn out. I hunted game exclusively with handguns for almost 20 years and kinda fell out of it. That Ruger Old Army is powerful enough for the job, and the thought of getting back into the game with black powder is really starting to get under my skin.

    I just wish Ruger would turn out a traditional model muzzleloader!!!!!! I really admire the style in general, and I'd love to see what Ruger could do with the idea.

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