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Thread: 1 1/2 y/o fenale weimaraner to good home

  1. #1
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    Default 1 1/2 y/o fenale weimaraner to good home

    She is a great dog. We need to get her to someone who has lots of land or a fence. She is running after small kids in the neighborhood and though she has not yet bitten anyone we think she just can't resist the "chase" of it. She is well behaved otherwise, no other issues but we can't afford to build a fence and she will chase even if we are right there with her.

    She has not had any formal training, she has just been a family dog. She does fetch and fetch and fetch and.... you get the idea, we can't throw the ball enough. She also retrieves very well and in fact gets the newspaper for us every morning.

    We would love to keep her, but we're afraid she is going to bite someone. Any takers? Any ideas?

    Let us know.

  2. #2

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    Your punishing a dog you haven't even tried to train? That doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. I hope your able to find some time to get her to classes, at least some sort of OB class if nothing else. She's still a pup! You think its hard on you to re- home her, just think, it'll be even harder on her when shes bounced around from home to home because of her lack of training.
    Weren't you just on here last fall wanting to breed her?

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    Thanks for your positive feedback AK HUNT. I took the dog out of a bad situation that it was in and did my best to train it. So I'm posting here to get some advice on how to break her of being so protective of our yard. I want to keep her not "re-home" her, but if training is not successful I need to find another place for her.

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    Mulno,

    I'd have to agree, you need to get this girl to some classes, There are many out there to choose from. It's up to you to control her. From the looks of things I would have thought you were rehoming her as well with the title

    "
    1 1/2 y/o fenale weimaraner to good home" also posted in Swap and Sell?


    Maybe I'm wrong, I have been in the past..... Have you tried contacting her breeder to see if they may be able to mentor you while you decide what to do? They may have some useful hints and know of a good trainer to get her to?
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Default Electronic Fence and training

    I have a German Shorthair Pointer and a Weim which are both about 1.5 years in age. It took them less than two hours to figure out the electronic fense. Both great dogs, especially if I can get my GSP to get over being car sick everytime.

    Terry

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    Default sorry about the length of the reply but.......

    We do want to keep her, first and foremost. We have done lots of in-home training for a family dog. When I was referring to "training" i was really referring to specialized "hunting" training as this is that type of forum.

    So, please let me clarify a few things. She normally follows all commands, she normally will stay in the yard with us and play so the behavior is unpredictable for her. She normally is very sweet and only barks for protection and is wonderful with our young children. But on several occasions, a small child will catch her eye and she will take off after the child and disobey commands. she has done so from playing in the yard with us as well as when the kids are going out to play, she will push through the front door to chase the child that has caught her eye. She has never bitten anyone yet but has come very close as we have watched her lunge as the child barely escapes her teeth. it is usually at that time she finally responds to us and comes back. We always scold her and seperate her from the family (kennel). She does seem "guilty", tucks what little tail she has and hangs her head.

    We have tried and electric collar with her, it seems to have almost no effect. We turn it up in increments and even at it's highest setting it does little more than make her turn her head to figure out what caused it. We have tested the collar, my husband shocked himself (: and it was a strong shock.

    So, maybe we were not very well educated on the needs of this breed when we got her, but she came from someone who is not a breeder and probably didn't provide the best situation for the puppies. We were not in the market for a dog, but felt compelled to take her out of that situation.

    We love her and are quite attached but we cannot afford to build a fence, nor can we risk that she may bite a child causing either pain/injury or just a dis-like for dogs. We are homeowners and business owners and have a lot to lose should we get sued.

    If her behavior was predictable we might be able to firgure it out but so far, we can't. We are absolutely open to POSITIVE advice and feedback, but ultimately we will not keep her in our neighborhood full of kids and risk the child, our financial future and her life should she have to be put down for biting if we can't reslove the behavior.

    Thanks for the positive advice thus far, keep it coming. Please keep any negativity to yourself or if you really must vent to us then please do so privately, you don't know us so you may not understand that we are a good family that loves her and really are trying to do the best we can.

  7. #7

    Default Weims...

    Weims can be a challenge, especially if you are not familiar with some of their quirks. Weims love people and need alot of exercise. I would suggest an e-collar and some training. My Weims have been very quick learners, two or three days in the front yard with an e collar on a low stimulation level (test on yourself) and you will be suprised at the difference. If you llike her, dont give up, train her to do what you want her to do. Weims can be outstanding companions, but they can also be stubborn especially in their teenage years. Good Luck!

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Most e-collar problems like you describe (no shock on the dog or limited shock even on high setting) stem from poor contact with the dog's neck. Just like a car battery with a corroded connection won't give enough juice to start a car, a loose e-collar will not administer a good correction to the dog. You have to get the prongs through the hair and tight up against the skin. It needs to be tighter than you might think, the prongs should be pushing against the skin. You should just be able to slip two fingers under the collar, and by slip I mean you have to squeeze your fingers under there. The prongs won't cause any damage to the dog because you should only have the collar on while you're training with her, not all day long. Also, fit the collar up high on the neck. A dog's neck is thinner at the top near the ears and if you fit it low on the neck they will scratch or shake it to the top where it won't make a good connection.

    And seriously, the problem you describe is that you can't keep your dog from running after children. A $10 leash will stop the problem and paired with a proper slip-chain or pinch collar will even correct it. For about $30 you could fix all of your problems just by keeping her on a leash; you don't even have to do any training, just hold the end and the dog will teach itself next time it tries to run away.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    what tricks does the dog know?

    Ray
    Semper Fi!

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    Mulno,

    Unfortunately you have to take the good with the bad when it comes to dog training. In other words, Have thick skin... (grin) It's not all kitties and lollipops. I'm sure the negative things your reading are concern for the dog, not to mention those two precious children you posted with your dog.

    I have said this many times, and I even use it on myself from time to time when I sit back and say "you dumb dog!" There is no such thing as a bad dog, just bad owners. We are the ones with the brains, just some dogs take more work. Please do not read between the lines there, we all have to start somewhere, and your doing the right thing by coming here.
    It sounds to me like you need to pack you and your family up and get her to training classes. She is not respecting you as the Alpha, and has no clue what "come" means otherwise she would stop dead in her tracks (if she was well trained) In the mean time K9 had the best idea so far since you don't think the e-collar will work on her. Keep her tethered, even in the house. The first time she bolts out that door with you on the other end of the leash, you go the opposite direction and take her off her feet, she'll think twice next time. You need to teach her (on leash) to sit and stay. Put her in a sit, open the door, if she moves correct her, and tell her to sit. She sits and stays until you release her to come out the door. If she sits and stays you allow her to come out with you, make her sit again. PRAISE her every time. Consistency is a big thing......YOU NEED TO DO EVERYTHING BEFORE HER! Do the same thing going in the house. You should always be the first one in and out the door, with her following you. (We even eat dinner before the dogs do)

    This is just one of many problems you have going on but it'll help you with your bolting situation. You have to get your position back in the family. Right now she doesn't think highly of you and her drive is pushing her past anything you have to say......


    I hope this helps! I'm sure one of us on here can give you trainers to go see. Where are you located? Wetland may even be able to help you out with the basics.......

    One last thing I forgot to mention. My fear of you putting her into a new home would be that it would become someone else's probablem and at that point could become a liability. If her own owner thinks that she might bite a child then its time to do the kindest thing, euthanasia. It's not fair to a new family to have to take on a potential time bomb.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Here is some good helpful tips that can at least get you on your way. Its a start until you can find someone to work with you on her basic commands.

    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIP...capeArtist.php
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  12. #12
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default a bit confusing

    Mulno,
    I must admit I was a little confused at first as well. I sent an email to some one who has a young female already & was possibly considering another. Now I think you just need to train her.
    Weims like to chase & you need to get through to her she can't chase bikes, runners, 4 wheelers, snow machines & especially screeming kids.
    One possible way to do this is repetition in a controlled envionment. Get a pinch collar & a short check cord. Have her out front with your husband holding the leash & have someone she doesn't know run, bike, by just like when she is chasing the kids. She will run until she hits the end of the leash he will pull on it while giving correcting instructions. After a couple reps of this she will know what the pinch collar is & what it means when he says no & pulls on it. This may take a few reps & over a couple days but she will get it.
    Then as huntress said never let her go out before you, that way you can check the area for kids & keep control of her.
    Finally you can get a stake ( try AK mill & feed ) to pound in your yard & always have the check cord attached to the stake. Then when ever you are out in the yard & she is with you she is attached to the stake & cannot run after anything. She will stop chasing & will know when the pinch collar or e-collar is on, so you must consistent with what ever method you choose.

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    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Default persistence pays

    There has been some good ideas here...mostly along the lines of training. I agree, it sounds like she needs more.
    There are good tools out there but they need to be used properly. Example, if you use the electric collar, the dog has to be conditioned to it before going straight to the button. The dog needs to know how to "turn off the juice". The dog has to know the command before it can be corrected for doing something wrong.
    Do not confuse the pinch collar with a choke collar. Some may disagree, but I do not like the choke collar. There is a difference.
    You can always keep her on a leash, but that in itself does not train her. It is a bandaid to the problem.
    If you are interested in training her to be a good pet and you want her to use some hunting skills it can be done. You have to be persistent.
    I have a Weim and I am a member of the Arctic Bird Dog Association. We are just finishing our novice class, bubt we have people, including myself who are willing to mentor and assist you. We are having a Fun Day on Saturday June7th. Come join us and meet some folks who might be able to help. Bring the girl dog!
    Or contact me via PM and I can get you more info.

  14. #14

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    I have trained a lot of dogs just like yours. They can be trained to live obediently, but it also takes a change in your lifestyle and an understanding of how your dog thinks and operates to maintain that control.
    Here I educate the dog, but sometimes training the owner is much more difficult. Because the owner doesn't think like a leader, doesn't want to change their lifestyle or simply doesn't understand dog psychology. Therefore the dog eventually takes over again. I get these dogs back for a "so called" refesher course but it's the owners that really need it. Consistency is what maintains obedience.
    Proper obedience is the key to everything.

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    Thanks to all for your advice.

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    Default Lifestyle change

    I'm in the middle of it. I've got a 6month old "hot" field bred Springer and a 2 year old Springer in the house. We have two kennels, a electronic collar, five different leads strategically placed around the house. A staked long lead for the front yard helps all the time. I always have him sit before going out, EVERY time. I always eat first. When he does eat I spit in his food and maintain "dominance" over it just momentarily. Its not all fuzzy puppies and hugs around my place anymore. I run a tight ship and in return I get a look from Z that speaks of comfort and belonging. He is learning and I'm afraid I'm into this for at least another year before it becomes second nature for him to fully understand me and visa-versa.

    I also have to work him every day. Not just fetch but make things challenging. Blind retrieves, double retrieves, obsticals, ect........

    Were having fun sometimes!

    Best wishes

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    Default Weimie trials....

    We adopted a yr old Weim who was chained in yard, no discipline, manners. Her idea of fun was to steal clothes off the line. Our initial trainer told us Weimies mature at anywhere from 18-24 months. She definitely was a challenge! But in the end, she was the most amazing (and beautiful) dog we ever had. 90 lbs in her prime, big boned female, all muscle, beautiful head (not whippy or rough looking), a perfect specimen... Dad hunted her on pheasants down here. We've had brittanies and GShorthairs before, but have to admit that Weimie was THE best. We did have to use an E collar on her (she decided one day she was going to follow the mallards out into the river and she almost got caught up in the treeline (river was flooded) and swept downstream. Needless to say, next time we "peeped" the whistle for her recall and she didn't respond (and kept advancing towards the ducks), she was a little surprised at the shock she got). Alot of people would stop me on our walks and ask/comment on the E collar; would tell them honestly, that it literally saved her life, otherwise she would end up (again) out in the river and swept away.
    I also agree with the other remarks that you need to rethink your dog training "energy" and ideas. I currently have a Chow/GShepherd mix I adopted at a year old. A total wild child, the prev owners installed NO discipline at all. The first year, I think I walked her 3x, she was so uncontrollable. Then I saw an episode of "The Dog Whisperer". Skeptics may laugh (and believe me, we had enough hunting dogs that I saw the various ways of training them) but his program totally changed the way I look at the relationship with dogs now. Believe me, the Chow and I have had "discussions" about things, esp who was the alpha female and her posessiveness of HER pig ear. Now, she's the perfect companion and protection dog; I can walk at night and not worry about anyone bothering me. Watch the program and read his book; truly amazing what he does with the red zone dogs. Rethink your ways and redirect your energy; you need to show the Weimie you're the alpha dog, yet you don't ever have to lay a hand on her. (Believe me too, the hunting breeds are TOTALLY different from this Chow/Shepherd mentality. Mine thinks she's a police dog...).
    Good luck in training her. She needs exercise, if not daily runs. Dog Whisperer says "Exercise, discipline, THEN affection", in that order. I walk the Chow mix EVERY day, sometimes 20 min, sometimes a 90 min hike if we're camping. Makes all the difference in the world.
    A good Weimie is hard to find....have loved all my dogs, but Weimie will ALWAYS share the most special place in my heart. When my Chow/Shep goes, she'll be right up there w/ the Weimie.
    (Feel free to PM me is you wish).
    PS Our Weimie never bit anyone...except when my Grandma stuck her hand thru the side yard fence! My Chow averages a bite a year...

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