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Thread: Burbot in the Tanana.

  1. #1
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    Default Burbot in the Tanana.

    I love to fish for burbot in the Tannana River just wondering if any one is willing to share some tips for taking more home at the end of the day. Have caught alot but maye be someone knows a few tricks to do better every trip out.

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    I try to stay away from the heavily fished areas anymore (like the confluence of the tanana and chena)and i catch alot bigger fish and most of the time more.It seems like if I get off the beaten path even a little ways i always do alot better.I also use a couple different baits that i'm sure not many if anyone else in the area uses.I know burot are'nt that pickey but the more scent you get out the better.

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    Kind of funny here in Minnesota we can catch a barrel full of them on some of the bigger lakes. Down here they tast like mud and you really cant eat them. Some people do but i have never had burbot that i would eat and i have tried them many ways. Down here we call them eelpout.

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    Up here we call them '' poor man's lobster "! I eat them many different ways and like them all.

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    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default very good eating

    the ones that i have eaten anyway. maybe some bait soaked in herring oil or a chum canister nearby to scent them in. i am going to be headed up that way myself soon and am looking to do some burbot fishing. i fished the eddys and got off the beaten path and did pretty well. going to try and fish the clearwater inlets this time around.

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    I am not knocking anyone for eating them! I am sure the ones in Alaska re much better than the ones down here!

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    I'll tell you this, the burbies in the North West Territories are very good.
    If you put it side by side with Pacific Cod you can not tell the difference.

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    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default texture

    the texture on the burbot here in alaska is more of a scallop texture and quite different than i have eaten compred to any fish.

    kgpcr, no worries i didnt think you were insulting anyone. all will be just fine as long as you eat a big plate of burbot while you are up here and love it!!

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    Member Limetrude's Avatar
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    Talking Set Lines the only way?

    Just a quick question, I am planning on doing some burbot fishing this week on the Tanana, but I am really not the sort of person who likes doing setlines. I would much rather work either lures or at the very least sit there with my rod waiting for a strike. Its just my personality... using setlines is like trapping, nothing wrong with it and very challenging in and of itself, but I prefer the fun and thrill of hunting. So the question is this, has anyone had much success with normal angling techniques on river burbot? I was thinking of setting up a pair of poles with 6/0 Circle hooks with a whole 5" herring or maybe a grayling head as bait. Going out in the evening, and finding some deeper pools offshore of decent spruce forest, cast in and wait. Am I insane to expect results? Can anyone lend a tip as to what habitat to look for when searching out burbot? Thanks...

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    I have had success using walleye rigs and shiner minnows up here.
    The walleye rigs have 2 per snelled hooks that you bait up. The setup is line to rig to weight. Toss it out set it in a sand spike and have a cold one.

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    Here in MN a shiner on the bottom works better than just about anything. They are not to fussy about what they eat. The key is to keep it on the bottom.

  12. #12

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    The best bait for burbot is baby lampreys. When I was a kid I used to go down to the mud bank behind AlaskaLand and dig up a bunch of them then go out behind the airport and catch burbot.

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    The Burbot up here taste great and the little lamphries work like a charm. As of right now they are still pretty small. Dug up a bunch last Fri.

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    just a side note my kid had more fun diging for the eels than fishing for burbot. He thinks it is boring to watch a line in the water. I have to agree that it he is right.

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    Question Thread Ressurection

    Ok, I have been spending some time on the Tanana lately and have a question for those who love to Burbot fish out there. What kind of structure/water are you looking for to find them? I know I have heard about fishing the clearwater inlets, it just does not seem there are that many of them around. I have been stopping from time to time and leaving out the bait for 1/2 hour or so along steep cutbanks, but the current normally seems pretty fast compared to the traditional deep pools. Most of these areas are only 6 feet deep, thus I toss out my bait and wait for about a half hour before doubt sets in and I decide there is no self respecting burbot who is going to be found in water that fast without a back eddy at the very least.

    Any thoughts, hints, and tips would be greatly appreciated!

  16. #16
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by yukonPike View Post
    The Burbot up here taste great and the little lamphries work like a charm. As of right now they are still pretty small. Dug up a bunch last Fri.
    I've only fished for burbot in winter, and have never dug up lampreys. Since I live in Mat-Su, I figured the lampreys weren't around here, but I found out I was wrong. They even run into the Kenai River.

    But there may be much fewer of them in the Susitna and Kenai drainages than in the Yukon/Tanana.

    I've never figured out how to find them in the mud. Is it like clams where there are dimples in the mud, or do you just start digging until you find them?

  17. #17
    Member Limetrude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    I've only fished for burbot in winter, and have never dug up lampreys. Since I live in Mat-Su, I figured the lampreys weren't around here, but I found out I was wrong. They even run into the Kenai River.

    But there may be much fewer of them in the Susitna and Kenai drainages than in the Yukon/Tanana.

    I've never figured out how to find them in the mud. Is it like clams where there are dimples in the mud, or do you just start digging until you find them?
    I believe there are fewer in the Susitna, cant say anything about the Kenai since I have never been there. But I used to live close to the little su and went fishing there every year quite often. Several times I would see a couple dozen 6-12 inch lamprays wriggling along heading downstream. As far as finding them, I live 5 minutes away from the AlaskaLand mudflats the others in this post spoke of and have yet to dig one up, I ditto your statement of not knowing what to look for. Do we dig in the sand above the water until we get down to the water table? Is there any tell-tale hole/dimple or bubbles to look for or do you just blindly shovel mud and sift it to look for the wigglers? Anyone who can help us out, much appreciated.

  18. #18
    Member barleydog's Avatar
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    I'll try to help out...
    In the Chena, find a soft mucky bottom that's hard to walk on. Alaskaland is great! Next, dig a "sample" in about 3 ft. of the muck and bring it up. I use a laundry net on a piece of foam kids swimming noodle tied in a circle. Drop the sample into the mesh net and work it with your hands to get the sediment out. YOu should only have lampreys and debris left in your bag! You can use a small butterfly net too, or anything with a small mesh diameter that'll hold a shovel full of muck. Place the lamprey larvae into a small bucket and then flash freeze on wax paper at home. Move them to a plastic bag, and use as bait when needed.
    Hope this helps!

  19. #19
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    Thank you!

    Does time of year matter (spring/summer/fall)?

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    I don't know about the susitna but meadow creek has lamprey. I see them every spring. you can get a small net and scoup them out of the water pretty easily. The ones I have seen are around 6 inches long. There might still be a few but they won't be there much longer.

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