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Thread: Opinions on a Wallas stove

  1. #1
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Default Opinions on a Wallas stove

    I am looking for those that have the wallas stove in their boats and what they think about it. I have the option of installing this, or to do a three burner propane stove for about the same cost. The boat will have a Webasto 3500 furnace in it, so I will not need the wallas for heat.

    The way I see it, the advantages of the Wallas is that it is safer, since there is no propane, and there is one less fuel source to keep filled, since it uses deisel instead of propane and it is safer than propane.

    The disadvantages are that it is a slower heat source, and does not cool down right away. Can those that own one of these comment? How is it to cook on this unit? Is the difference similar to a gas vs. electric range in a house, or is there more of a difference? I had also heard that the wallas could be used to dry gloves, etc. Can someone explain this to me. Is there any diesel smell in the cabin with the wallas unit?

    Thanks,

    Jim

  2. #2
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    I have the wallas cook top/blower in mine. I like it so far. There is absolutely no smell in the cabin from either the furnace, oven, or stove. The draw backs I see are that it takes awhile to cool down and heat up just like the gas versus the electric range at home. I am not a big fan of propane on a boat. I recommend running kerosene verses diesel. It burns hotter and cleaner.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  3. #3
    Member AkBillyBow's Avatar
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    I just installed one on my boat, and have only run it 1 time as a test. The things that sold me on it are : it has the safe burn box, propane will add moisture to your cabin air, where this will actually dry it out, it burns a very low amount of fuel.

    1 draw back is that it also requires electricity...but I can deal with that.

    If you get the blower lid (which I did), you simply close the lid after cooking, and it will blow the hot air into you cabin until the burner has totally cooled off. That will heat up the cabin, and keep the hot surface away from peoples hands!!

    It is kind of spendy, but I feel worth it.

    AkBillyBow
    2007 Glacier Bay Cat 2690 Coastal Runner, Twin Honda 150's

  4. #4
    Member GOT TOYS's Avatar
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    Cool Wallas

    If and when mine dies, I will replace it with a like unit. Our gear can be soaked when we go to bed, and dry when we wake up. Even with the cool temps last weekend, (the bay we were in froze overnight), we were comfy with the temp control set all the way down to 1 in our 25' tin can. No smell except for a few seconds outside during startup and shutdown. I use Kleen Heat. $10/gallon, but we only burned 1.5 gallons in 4 days of nearly constant heater use, and it is supposedly the best choice for this stove. Consumption this summer will drop to about 1/2 gallon in 4 days. It does take a while to make morning coffee if your stove hasn't already been on for night heat/drying. I have always run it on #1 marine starting battery, along with my GPS/sounder, some lights, and some music and never had a problem firing up the Honda 225 in the morning. I always keep battery #2 fully charged in case though.
    By the way, a buddy of mine has something like it, ceramic top but different brand, don't recall what. His fan ran all the time. I could smell his and it burned my eyes when I was in his cabin, though he was burning diesel.

  5. #5
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    Default Wallas

    I'll jump in with the previous approvers. We have run ours 3 years with out even one hicup. We use klean heat exclusively and like everything about the stove. Were on a 25 ft C-dory and NEVER cold!
    Mike

  6. #6
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    Default Wallas stove

    I really like mine,it does take some time to heat up and if you are a lite sleeper the clicking of the lift pump bothers some.

  7. #7
    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    Default Wallas

    My current boat has a single burner Wallas stove with blower lid. It works ok but I rarely use it. Runs on diesel. I also have a Wallas Diesel furnace I think it is a D-40. Works great use it a lot. Only draw back is I wish it had a regular type thermostat instead of just a heat control. High Medium Low. For cooking I use a hot plate or the microwave.

  8. #8
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    Default wallas

    I had one on my osprey--the only issue I had was the "sideways"rain in Whittier allowed water to collect in the exhaust vent hose. That had to be drained before the thing would start. After the water was drained, it worked GREAT!

  9. #9

    Default Wallas fuel

    Where are you guys buying the kleen heat fuel? Do you get better heat output than the straight diesel? Will be trying it on a 2 burner cook top with the blower lid.

  10. #10
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sport drifter View Post
    Where are you guys buying the kleen heat fuel? Do you get better heat output than the straight diesel? Will be trying it on a 2 burner cook top with the blower lid.
    Bought mine at home depot.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  11. #11
    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    I had a Wallas for several years, and it worked very well in my little 22 C-Dory. Having the heater was the key benefit, however. It ran on a jug of #1 grade kerosene for a very long time, with no troubles at all.

    I now have a propane cooktop, and I much prefer it for cooking, just as I prefer gas vs electric or ceramic stove tops for cooking at home. I'd choose the Wallas only if I wanted the heater function.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

  12. #12
    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    Used to have an Osprey with a Wallas single-burner stove/heater. Worked OK, but didn't really excel as either a heater or as a stove (took forever to heat up, and the heat was hard to control precisely). We've now got another boat with a Webasto furnace and a propane two-burner stove/oven. The Webasto does a much better job of heating than the Wallas, and the propane stove does a much job of cooking. The wife would never go back to the Wallas.

  13. #13

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    I have used a Wallas for the last 4 years. Works great until it quits, then there is no way in the world you can figure out what to do.

    Mine quit once. After I pulled everything apart and put it back together about 4 times, I packed it up and sent it down to Seattle.
    It was fixed and sent back pretty quickly, but not cheaply.

    I have run mine on diesel, kerosene, and Kleen-Strip, and mixed and matched. Seems to make no difference.

    The fan is a bit noisy for overnight, but it draws very little current.

    Dry heat with no moisture introduced into the cabin is a big plus.

    Overall, I have to rate it pretty highly. I like my hot cup of coffee in the morning.

    Also, I added a Webasto for heat last spring. It works great - fueled from the same tank. The bad part was the Webasto Do-It-Yourself kit, which came with about a million tiny parts, terrible instructions, and no parts list. Sure Marine in Seattle was a big help.

  14. #14

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    I love mine. It is slower than propane, but what's the hurry most of the time? It is cheap to run and keeps the cabin toasty warm on my CD 22 on all but the coldest days. This year, for the first time, I slept in the v-birth in the Seward on a weekend in March. It got down to 19. I went fishing the next day when it was about 35. I was surprised that it was reasonably warm during the night - not toasty, but ok. When it was in the 30s and sunny it was very warm - nearly too warm. I would buy another one in my next boat - if there is a next boat

  15. #15
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    When I first had my boat built, I had a Wallas stove top with blower lid and a Wallas oven installed. (Sea Sport thought I was crazy!! turns out they were right) I fought the oven for 2 years before I gave up on it. The stove top unit did work for about 2 seasons and then started to act up, all that computor stuff is just to complicated. I also had to send mine down to Seattle for repair. I finally replaced both units with a Force 10 propane stove/oven combo. We use the stove for cooking alot, gormet stuff etc. and the Wallas was imposible to do any fancy cooking on. If you don't need it for heat and want to cook real food, I would recommend a propane stove.

  16. #16
    Member smtdvm's Avatar
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    Default Wallas

    Well, I loved mine until last week. It stopped working, blew some fuses and started me trouble shooting. Ordered a new glow plug from Scan Marine and got it in two days for 67 bucks. Installed it tonight and she works great again. Now, I still like it but must say, beyond the initial expense, the frustration and complexity of it is a problem when it quits. Got me to thinking about another diesel heater in addition to the Wallas. When it works, it makes the boat. I have tried kerosene and Clean heat but use strictly diesel now (number one) and keep it fresh, recylcing the older stuff to the house heating oil tank.

  17. #17

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    How difficult was it to change the glow plug?

  18. #18

    Default Wallas

    I installed one and so far have not had a problem except for me being in a hurry. Sure propane is faster and maybe hotter but the amount of water it puts in the air sure made the sleeping bag cold to get into.
    The manual talks about old kerosene being a problem and what to add if it has sat, along with the fact it takes 5 min to fully fire up, the voltage has to be good for every thing to work right also. But safety & moisture was a big issue. If you install one make sure to read every last detail!
    Last edited by alaskapiranha; 09-23-2009 at 17:09.

  19. #19
    Member smtdvm's Avatar
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    Default Wallas Glow Plug

    It was surprizingly easy once I figured out how. I first pulled the whole stove out of the counter top, flipped it over and removed the two lock nuts at the heat cover for the fire chamber. Then removed the clamp and three wires on the glow plug and pulled it out with slight manipulations to clear the circuit board. I found the plug was bad, reinstalled the stove with old plug in place. When I got the new plug, I was able to pull it without pulling the stove. I needed again to remove the two lock nuts to get the heat plate out of the way and then was able to replce the plug. Took ten minutes. You will see the items I am talking about when you look at the area around the glow plug. There is a photographic Wallas manual on www. c-brats.com that can be helpful too. The factory says that the glow plug is about the only user servicable item due to techincal complications and close tolerances of everything else.

  20. #20

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    Thanks for the explanation.

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