Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Knots for shrimp/crab pots.

  1. #1

    Default Knots for shrimp/crab pots.

    Does anyone have an example of a secure knot to use to tie your buoy line to the pot bridle? I tried a couple of things but the polypro rope is so slippery that I ended up just tying a bunch of square knots and wrapping that with a bunch of duct tape. It works but looks stupid.

  2. #2

    Default

    are you talking about holow braided rope, or twisted rope?
    with a hollow rope, you and use a Ball point pen to make a loop aaround the handle, then insert it into the center of the rope then exit out the sideand back through... (this is easy to 'splain eh?) i'll try to find a website that explains it better...

    if it is poly twist, you have to braid it... pretty easy.

    here are instructions.. just make the loop around the handle, or use a hook like it shows...

    http://www.uberpest.com/gangline.html

  3. #3
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    A couple of ways,
    1. tie it on with a bowline knot
    2. anchor hitch & tuck the end back thru the lay of the rope a couple of times
    3. Tie/splice a big loop in the end of the buoyline then you can pass the end of the loop thru the buoy eye and loop it back over the buoy. Its called a loop to loop connection in the fly fishing world.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  4. #4

    Default

    I am having a brain fart right now but I am pretty sure it's the black and orange braided floating poly pro. I like the idea of making that big loop eyelet. I tried some of those other knots and I was not real confident that they were going to stay without constant tension on them. Any idea how to go about braiding it back on itself?

  5. #5
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chauvotsm View Post
    I am having a brain fart right now but I am pretty sure it's the black and orange braided floating poly pro. I like the idea of making that big loop eyelet. I tried some of those other knots and I was not real confident that they were going to stay without constant tension on them. Any idea how to go about braiding it back on itself?

    Here's an animation of how to splice a loop into stranded nylon rope.

    http://www.animatedknots.com/splice/...matedknots.com

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks, that is perfect.

  7. #7
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    I take the end of the rope and make a loop. Then I make a knot so I have a loop. Then I use a clamp. The reason I do this is I have my rope in 300 feet section. If I'm going to shrimp shallow waters I don't need all that rope.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  8. #8
    Member steelguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wrangell/NJ
    Posts
    216

    Thumbs up quick connection

    Between the bridle and floating main line use a pair of HOOK BRUMMEL FAST EYE 200# AL/MG, which I bought of at Seattle Marine. I also use the same from my main line to buoy, and also to add additional lengths of line to go deeper. The connections are very simple, quick and keep things organized. Commercial friends gave me the tip and it works! You can find it at the following link:
    http://www.seattlemarine.net/product...idSupplier=10&
    idcategory=1078&custo

  9. #9
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    Between rigging pots, buoys, anchors, and all commercial longlining gear, 95% of the knots are bowlines. Easy to tie, almost no chance of coming loose on its own, and easy to untie.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Between rigging pots, buoys, anchors, and all commercial longlining gear, 95% of the knots are bowlines. Easy to tie, almost no chance of coming loose on its own, and easy to untie.
    With the rope I am using, the elbow that lock down the knot does not want to stay hitched without pressure being kept on the rope. It's slippery as hell.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •