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Thread: digiscoping?

  1. #1
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    Default digiscoping?

    Are any of you digiscoping? I've seen no mention of it here. I just started, and am looking forward to good images of water fowl this summer, but i have a lot to learn.

    Lesson 1... I need a considerably better tripod to keep things steady.
    Lesson 2.... I am having some difficulty get the focus right using the screen of my camera while I adjust my scope.

    Any advice would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Yes you need a rock solid tripod.

    I use the zoom on my camera to zoom in to get rid of the circle edges. Then I use the spotting scope to focus. I also use a remote so I don't have to touch the setup to take a pic, helps a lot.

    Good Luck

    Steve

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Steve, lets see some fruits of your labor!

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Got a new setup will try to take a few shots while out in Valdez over the next few weeks.

    Steve

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default yep...

    Digiscoping is a great way to get close ups of wild game/birds. But there is some technique/equipment needed. Solid tripod and a cable release are mandatory. Some people will tell you to use the self timer. Forget it! Animals/birds will not wait on that. A cable release is needed. I learned that the hard way and recently ordered a release for my Zeiss Diascope 85 from England. I have a Sony DSC ... camera that I choose after reading up on the subject. Some digital cameras are better suited to Digizooming than others. Rock/sand bags that you hang on the tripod (or hang your gear bag) will be helpful. The slightest movement from the earth settling, wind, and such, will make your viewfinder bounce all over the place. The more magnification, the worse obviously. I photographed some Musk Ox on the mountains near Nome while living there in 2006. I got about 1/10 images worth keeping. I had a nice Bogen 3021 tripod (still made but different model number), but did not have the cable release. Does the term "pissing in the wind" mean anything to you? Check out tripods on B&H Photo/Video. They sell everything. You can put "Bogen 3021" in the search box at the B&H site and it will direct you to the new model. Wonderful tripod and rock solid. Pick the head carefully. The larger the lcd on the camera, the better, as that is how you will be focussing. I would consider 3" a minimum. Below is a great website with lots of information for you. I learned a lot there myself. Great site.

    http://www.zbirding.info/HomePageCon...nstruction.htm
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  6. #6
    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    Digiscoping is a great way to get close ups of wild game/birds. But there is some technique/equipment needed. Solid tripod and a cable release are mandatory.
    ...
    Below is a great website with lots of information for you. I learned a lot there myself. Great site.

    http://www.zbirding.info/HomePageCon...nstruction.htm
    That is a lot of very good advice!

    I don't do "digiscoping", but I do use some really long lenses attached to a rather largish DSLR. The problems are pretty much all the same. I thought I might add some comments about tripods, simply because that is a not too well understood area, and once you decide on the optics and the camera, the tripod is what decides if you can get the best pictures your lens and camera are capable of.

    All of Dan's advice about using a remote release, hanging a camera bag under the tripod, etc. are the right way to go.

    Good tripods come in only two varieties. Heavy and/or expensive!

    And it does make a difference. There are two reasons for that, one is vibration from wind and the other is vibration from tripping the shutter on the camera. Obviously a DSLR used in a windy location (average wind here is 12 MPH!) means a good tripod is indispensable. In a less windy area, and using a camera that uses all electronics rather than a mirror/mechanical shutter can make a difference (as long as a remote release is used, so your hand doesn't cause vibration).

    Expensive tripods are made of carbon fiber, and typically cost a significant amount more than tripods made of aluminum. The advantage is two fold though; first carbon fiber is lighter, but it also vibrates less! Tripods resonate, much like a tuning fork, and the damping (how quickly the vibration stops) is much better with CF than with an Al tripod. And if you plan on backpacking far, every ounce of weight makes a difference.

    Four section legs are probably more stable than three section, but make it harder to set up too. And a center column for extra height might look nice to begin with, but the best advice is to never ever use it when you need a stable support. I can't bring myself to say never buy a tripod with a center column... I have one myself. So if I have an 800mm lens mounted, the column stays down, but if I'm using a 100mm lens and the tripod is mostly just so I don't have to hold the camera for two hours... I do use the column for extra height.

    So add up how much good pictures mean, and how much is in the piggy bank, and go spring for the best tripod possible. I haven't really looked, but I doubt there is a decent tripod available for under $100. A typical "good" tripod cost more than twice that, and a top flight tripod runs more than $500.

    And to be honest, tripods are petty much worth exactly what you pay for them!

  7. #7
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Here is my setup, I have a cable but prefer the remote. This is a cheaper tripod forgot the other.

    And here is the goods. One without the scope and one with.




    Steve

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