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Thread: SMOKER Racks

  1. #1
    Member aksportsmen's Avatar
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    Default SMOKER Racks

    hi there folks

    Im getting ready to make my own smoker i got the plans and everythign all ready just not real sure where to find the racks i need to put the fish on. any ideas on where to find some? i have a little chief and a big chief smoker but they just won't cut it for the amount of fish i got. that and they suck alot of juice that i don't wanna pay for. so if some one could point me in the right direction i would appreciate it.

  2. #2

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    You could always go to the dump and pull the racks out of refrigerators, then base the dimensions of your new smoker on the size of the racks.

  3. #3
    Member aksportsmen's Avatar
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    Default fridge racks

    i had heard that something they use to coat the rack in refrigerators is toxic if it got heated. somethign along the lines like that at least. there any truth in this? pretty much jsut needing to find the racks then can build the smoker around it.

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Wooden dowels would work. I'm using nylon screens in my dehydrator, Aluminum screen mesh might work.

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    Default Refrigerator racks and smokers

    If I recall correctly, 'fridge racks are often made with a fair amount of zinc oxide in the chrome-like finish. It's a no-no in smokers.

    OVEN RACKS, on the other hand, are often stainless steel (even though the used ovens look pretty grungy inside, including the racks), and I've gathered over 40 racks now for the walk-in smoker that we built.

    **Always thoroughly clean used oven racks with a proper cleaner/solvent, as you often have no clue as to who owned it, why they threw it away, or what they did with it while they were using it. After cleaning it thoroughly, rinse well, and sterilize one last time by heating them up, 6-10 at a time, in your own oven, at a respectably high temperature.

    I find oven racks left at transfer sites, inside the discarded ovens. I've even encountered persons with quantities of them, who'd intended to build a smoker, but never followed through on it. You can sometimes find these folks with quantities of racks, or individual racks, by advertising in various locations; craigslist (in the 'wanted' or 'free' column), the various radio-born tradio-type programs, web tradio, etc..

    I run my 2"x2" rails the distance from the wall of the most opportune dimension of the racks, then fill in side-to-side. When I get to the end of the run, if it takes less than a full rack to fill it, then cut one rack with an angle grinder to the width remaining to be filled in on the rails.

    If you know someone who welds stainless, etc., they can take some similarly-sized stainless rod, and weld it down the side you cut with the grinder, reconnecting the various wires that were severed on one end of the rack, and firming the structure back up. If not, then over-lap the racks rather than cutting one.

    On the tall side of our walk-in, we have it designed for 6 shelves tall, by 5' long (on that particular wall), and the inner support rail of 2"x2" that holds the inside edge of the rack is slightly less than the width of a standard 30" oven rack from the wall. Short sheet rock screws, sticking up just a smidgeon, can allow the racks to be held more firmly in place without actually fastening them to the wood. Put these on the 2"x2" that is screwed to the wall, (the rear support), as well as the 2"x2" that forms the inside rail, supporting the inside edge of the racks.

    You can also buy custom-cut, stainless steel screen mesh or stainless steel expanded metal with sufficiently large openings, but in both cases, they are NOT cheap.

  6. #6
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Default

    Split the fish down the middle drape the halves over the poles that you make from birch. Let the tails be in the up position and go for it. Of course this means you will need a tall smoker.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  7. #7

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    Restaurant supply house doughnut racks all the same size, you can get a sheet tray that is a little bigger to catch drips when using smoker for other than fish IE chickens.

    You can build the box from plywood and use 1 1/2 stainless screws to hold the racks simple and fast smoker

  8. #8
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    Default Racks

    I built a smoker this winter and I built it around the racks I bought. I went to Home Depot in Kenai and bought the racks for a gas barbeque. They are Porcelain and 15"x27" and I got 6 of them. They are close to $20 a rack. I figured this smoker will last the rest of my life and sprung for some top quality racks. I am glad I did. I use dowls for smoking sausage. Good luck.

  9. #9
    Member JustinW's Avatar
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    allied kenco has a good selection of racks, and they have just about anything else you could need for building a smoker and running it and processing meat. Just got to alliedkenco.com and do a search for "rack." They have stainless steel and chrome and other stuff as well.

  10. #10
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JustinW View Post
    allied kenco has a good selection of racks, and they have just about anything else you could need for building a smoker and running it and processing meat. Just got to alliedkenco.com and do a search for "rack." They have stainless steel and chrome and other stuff as well.
    DONT USE CHROME UNLESS YOU WANT CHROMIUM POISONING!!! Use the stainless...and NEVER use refidgerator racks!
    Nice Marmot.

  11. #11
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Fridge racks are galvanized, aluminum or chromed.

    The zinc in galvanized racks reacts with the brine residue and affects the flavor of your fish. Same thing with aluminum. Chromium is a heavy metal/toxin that accumulates in the body(ref Erin Brockovich(sp))

    I have salvaged oven racks in mine and they hold 3 or 4 red / silver fillets per rack

    Whatever you use it needs to be either uncoated steel or cast iron. (ceramic/enameled ok too)

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