Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 74

Thread: Dipnetting-lesson learned

  1. #21

    Default Globalstar SPOT

    An alternative to a satphone is the SPOT from Globalstar. It works in more places than a satphone since its such a small amount of data. Hit a button and it sends your GPS coordinates to the rescue people over a satellite. You can also make it periodically send your coordinates to a google maps page so people at home can keep track of where you are. And you can buy rescue insurance with it in case somebody wants you to pay for helicopter time. It's all pretty cheap too, I saw one at Walmart.

  2. #22

    Default

    If color matters with the netting why dosn't anybody make a dirty brown color net? wouldn't that be even better than a white one? Something the fish can't see?

  3. #23
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,424

    Thumbs down

    Quote Originally Posted by Landis View Post
    An alternative to a satphone is the SPOT from Globalstar. It works in more places than a satphone since its such a small amount of data. Hit a button and it sends your GPS coordinates to the rescue people over a satellite. You can also make it periodically send your coordinates to a google maps page so people at home can keep track of where you are. And you can buy rescue insurance with it in case somebody wants you to pay for helicopter time. It's all pretty cheap too, I saw one at Walmart.
    If a Satphone will not work neither will SPOT as they use the same Satellites for communication. SPOT is just another way for the satphone companies to try are recoup their costs.

    Along the Gulf of AK and further south they are good and reliable. As you move inland or get into valleys they become a whole lot less reliable. I also heard that rescue crews are not dialed directly into the distress freq. like an EPIRB.

  4. #24
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Net color...

    Quote Originally Posted by peanuts View Post
    If color matters with the netting why dosn't anybody make a dirty brown color net? wouldn't that be even better than a white one? Something the fish can't see?
    Maybe. From the comment of many experienced dipnetters, brown might work at Chitina I guess. But the Kenai isn't brown. What I got from comments on this thread was that "the right net" depends on:

    1. Whether you're dipnetting on the Kenai or Copper River
    a. Clear or light green tint best on Kenai
    b. More compact net in black or any color mesh best on Copper. A longer handle is sometimes real helpful too.

    2. Whether you're dipnetting for salmon or hooligan.

    The guesses about water clarity and strength of current make sense to me, but only the fish really know why.

    I've never dipped at Chitina. Sounds like people do very well and learning the best spots and techniques pays off. The caution about carrying rope and tying yourself off is also pretty consistent advice for the Copper.

    Good luck!

  5. #25

    Default

    I was told by a few people that the black net dosn't work on the Kenai. I was inline getting my permit and after I had already purchest a black dip net. Needless to say I didn't catch any with that net. I did however catch some with a white one and even a blue salmon net. I don't no why it should be any different on the Chitna.

  6. #26
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    687

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by peanuts View Post
    I was told by a few people that the black net dosn't work on the Kenai. I was inline getting my permit and after I had already purchest a black dip net. Needless to say I didn't catch any with that net. I did however catch some with a white one and even a blue salmon net. I don't no why it should be any different on the Chitna.
    You can't see 2 inches into the water at Chitina, just submerge an Oreo Cookie in Chocolate milk... can you see it before it floats up? If the fish can see the net it is because they are wrapped up in it.

    I have used black, green, and clear nets... and they all work the same.
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  7. #27

    Default Spot, Sat, Plb

    Yes, do the research before choosing a sat phone, SPOT or PLB (personal locator beacon). My understanding is that SPOT can require up to 15 minutes or more to confirm that you are connected and that your message went through. If it didn't connect, you have to resend.

    In an emergency situation, this is not ideal . . .

    The PLB with GPS makes more sense, although it is much more expensive than SPOT, but less than a Sat phone. SPOT requires that you pay an annual subscription fee, by the way, PLB does not, although PLB replacement batteries are running over $200 and some require that batteries be replaced by the factory.

  8. #28
    Member tjm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,125

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aktrouttamer View Post
    I prefer not to eat their bones, which would occur if you use an electric knife.
    I hate bones in my fillets as well...I did however use an electric knife for the first time last weekend....it took me a couple of fish to figure it out but now I can fillet a fish with out cutting through the rib bones, just like a regular knife....one smooth cut, trim the belly meat and your done...I noticed that if I use it just like a regular knife (just ignore that it's buzzing in your hand...) and feel the bones it works just the same...I am now much faster/better at filleting them.....I almost gave up on it and went back to a regular knife but Im glad I gave it a chance...
    ------------------------------------------------
    pull my finger....

  9. #29
    Member akscotts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    39

    Default net color

    From my experience, while on the kenai, use clear net, on chitna, either clear or black, or any color for that matter. They all look the same in chocolate milk, invisible.

  10. #30
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Dipnetting from a boat and depth ...

    New lesson for us from Kenai, 2008:
    We dipnetted from both shore and boat this year.
    On the days we fished, dipnetting was slow.
    Some friends in a boat, changed their luck when instead of holding the dipnet deep (along the bottom is usually best), they found fish higher in the water column. They scored fish on a day when it was slow for other boats.

  11. #31

    Default

    This is what happened to me a few years ago. I had just got down to the south beach on the Kenai on the first friday night of the season. I had my net in the water for about 15 minutes when a commercial boat went by kicking up some wake water. As everyone started backing up into shallower water to ride the waves out, my net-handle broke in half at a splice I had made in the center of it(so it would fit inside my truck box). I could see other half of my handle and net bobbing out to sea and I headed into the river to grab it. I quickly reached my net and stood on it while getting pounded in the chest by the boat wakes. The water I was standing in was too deep to grab the net without bending over. I was already taking in water from the top of my chest waders so I plunged down and grabbed my net .... which I am still standing on. I was still holding the other half of my handle with one hand so I only had one free arm. As I am trying to untangle my feet out of the netting, then the buttons on my coat at my wrist tangle in the netting as well.. not good... . I can't even stand up to get my head out of the water. I rip the buttons and netting holding my arm with one hard jerk, stood up, got a breath and started dragging myself back to shore. My waders had filled up with so much water I could hardly walk but I was fine.

    I was dipnetting alone so no one nearby me knew me, or even knew why I walked out into the river and just disappeared below the surface. "darndest thing I ever saw, a dipnetter going totally under water. ", one guy said to me afterwards. Yep, it a funny story now....

    Lessons learned:

    - do a better job of splicing a handle if I ever cut one in half again.

    - bring an extra dip-net, an extra set of waders, and dry clothes.

    - tie a belt off at my waist on the outside of my chest waders to not allow water to go below my waist in the event of another emerrsion experience.

    - dip net with someone else so there is someone there to help.

    - maybe wear a pfd... one of those inflatable neck yokes?

    -leave your cell phone in your truck....


  12. #32

    Default The water is cold!

    I learned that I am a fair weather dipnetter. I went down on a rainy, windy, and cold weekend that really sucked. We caught a few fish, and I caught a nasty cold. I am not sure it was worth it.

  13. #33
    Member akhunter3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    824

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabowhunter View Post
    -leave your cell phone in your truck....



    This I learned this summer as well

    Can't believe how expensive the wireless store down there is if you don't want to buy a plan


    I do have insurance now though



    Jon
    Nurse by night, Alaska adventurer by day!

  14. #34
    Member garnede's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    soon to be back in Alaska
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akhunter3 View Post
    This I learned this summer as well

    Can't believe how expensive the wireless store down there is if you don't want to buy a plan

    I do have insurance now though

    Jon
    X2 I killed a cell phone this year too. less than a month after killing another in the little su. I now have insurance for this very reason.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  15. #35
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    between wasilla and palmer
    Posts
    1,061

    Default

    The big thing I realized is don't go by yourself. Went down to kenai this last season. I had a slow start, 1 pink and a couple of hits that got out in about 4 hours. Then I felt some thing hit the net and start to run out towards the deeper water. I dug in and pulled back as hard as I could, but could not stop it. I slid for a bit then what ever it was came loose. I suspect it was a large king that hit the back of my net, got caught for a couple seconds then got loose.

  16. #36

    Default

    Learned years ago that when you get a big nasty wind blowing towards shore, pick your net up into the top of the waves. reds ride the waves in.

  17. #37
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default So, sometimes higher in the water column too?

    Quote Originally Posted by akspecialus View Post
    Learned years ago that when you get a big nasty wind blowing towards shore, pick your net up into the top of the waves. reds ride the waves in.
    Akspecialus: Interesting... a twist on what friends shared with me this year: "...they found fish higher in the water column. They scored fish on a day when it was slow for other boats." Thanks.

    When dipnetting is slow, maybe try higher in the water column.

  18. #38
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Thread recap: Lessons learned

    Good ideas from experienced dipnetters so far. This technique/lessons learned thread was started to give newcomers and others still learning (like me) the benefit of others' experiences. Most comments in the thread are for salmon, but hooligan are also dipnetted using a smaller net (smaller mesh and smaller net opening) - along Cook Inlet beaches plus a few rivers. The salmon dipnetting comments support different gear (and techniques) depending on whether you dip the Copper River at Chitna, or the Kenai/Kasilof Rivers.

    1. Net color:
    a). Chitna: Net color does not seem to matter.
    b). Kenai or Kasilof: clear or translucent net mesh seem to work better, possibly due to clearer water?

    2. Net size:
    a). Chitna: The very strong current and long net handles (preferred by some for better reach) limit the size of the net opening - because a large net is more work to handle. Long consistant sweeps that don't bottom out on the rocks thereby dumping your net (aktrouttamer).
    b). Kenai/Kasilof: Large is good from shore - and so is weight. The large/maximum diameter, fairly heavy nets with hoop made from aluminum rod do a good job from shore. The opening maximizes opportunity and the weight makes working in strong current (tide changes) much less work. We use two nets from Mike's Welding in Soldotna, similar probably to others'.

    3. From a boat, some would use a lighter net - but any dipnet can work here. My first net was the flyswatter-shape, extruded aluminum tubing which I bought from Soldotna Hardware on the advice of my boat-dipnetting mentor. From the boat, this net is primo. We occasionally would net 2 or even 3 fish at a time. Summer, 2008 however, my wife and her friend used the large heavy nets from a jon boat (Kenai R) and did well.
    a). Any net should be tied off (from just above the net) to the bow
    b). Some net handles will break off if you try to pry the loaded net on the gunwale into the boat.

    4. Take care of your fish. This is our current system and seems to produce better tasting, better looking fish, especially around February coming out of the freezer:
    -bleed (cut or rip the gills) then gut the fish,
    -clean the dark kidneys from alongside the spine (an old spoon works well)
    -put the fish on ice ASAP, (hauling 1 or 2 bags of ice to the beach does increase the hassle factor but ...our fish doesn't taste "off" in February like it used to).
    -rub slime off with salt (Call me crazy, but saw some guys do this one year and tried it. Don't know why but the meat seems to stay brighter and better flavor the following spring).

    Miscellaneous:
    5. Zipties make for a fast net repair if needed when the fish are running (alaskanmoosehunter).
    6. Tie yourself off to keep from falling in on the Copper River. There is a real risk of drowning along the Copper River due to the fast, turbulent water and the high silt load - which can weigh you down quickly, complicating self-rescue.
    7. Tie a fish-bonker and a stringer to your waist to save time (GreenTea) if you're wading out at Kenai or Kasilof.
    8. Electric knife speeds filleting salmon - some remove bones with needle nose pliers before vacuum-sealing then freezing.
    9. Be careful: the rocky, steep shores along the Copper River present some fall hazards. And stay out of the Copper River. At the Kenai mouth, currents get strong when the tide changes and sometimes within minutes. When you feel the current picking up quickly, think about easing your way onto firm footing at least.
    10. Consider using a wading belt outside your waders - to limit their capacity for filling up (from the outside at least ).
    11. "-leave your cell phone in your truck...." (Alaskabowhunter).
    12. When dipnetting is slow, maybe try higher (or elsewhere) in the water column.

    Great contributions on this thread.
    The mouth of the Kenai is a good place for beginners - just get your permit, then bring a big, clear/transulcent mesh net and cooler and do what everyone else is doing. What you'll need: permit, appropriate net, fish bonker, cooler. You'll need to wear waders and most people use gloves. The water is cold and anything you can do to stay dry helps stay in the water longer.

  19. #39
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Crowding at ramps...

    Anyone else spend a long time waiting for ramp access during Kenai dipnetting season last year? I prefer to dipnet from shore, but fish returns have been unreliable past 3 yrs. Anything to do about crowding at ramps?

  20. #40
    Member .338-06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,045

    Default

    Take a boat ride from one of the ramps upriver? I know gas isn't cheap, but it's a lot less hassle.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •