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Thread: Rem 700 cold weather trigger concerns

  1. #1
    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Default Rem 700 cold weather trigger concerns

    I am looking to replace my Rem 700 375 H&H trigger. Does anyone have experience with the Timney trigger with regards to freezing with very cold wet conditions. Or the Jard Model H 2 lever, or any other trigger?

  2. #2

    Default Hi Eastwoods;

    Well.....If you have your rifle all lubed up with goop...it will make a real difference. Don't put a bunch of grease or oil on your trigger group. It won't make a particle of difference when it is warm out, but can gum it up in really cold conditions. Stay with graphite and moly lubes for really cold work, dry lubricants are not affected by temperature. Again, it has to be really cold to see the difference.

  3. #3

    Default

    I have never had trouble with my factory 700 trigger sticking in the cold , down to -50f. I also have a Rifle basix trigger I really like, it also works well in the cold.
    Snowshooze has very good advice, to much of the incorrect lubricant, you may have problems.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I hunted with Remingtons for years. The triggers were "degreased" and free of all lubes. Everytime I hunted on Kodiak in subfreezing wet conditions the triggers of my Remingtons and the other Remingtons in camp were frozen.
    Lube or oils were not the culprit. Water getting inside the trigger and then freezing was the issue. The triggers never froze due to simply low temperatures, they froze due to ice formed inside the trigger.
    I solved my problem by going to Win 70 style rifles and there simple, bulletproof trigger design.
    Others may never have this problem. We did. I sold off my Remmies.
    Tennessee

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Default

    Every “frozen trigger” issue I ever had with a Remington was due to one of the following: excess lube, old lube, or wrong lube…………..and most of the time it was not the actual trigger that caused the problem (failure to fire) but the bolt group, specifically gelled lube either in the bolt body, or on and around the cocking piece / hammer. I don’t personally use dry lubes on anything, but that isn’t due to any kind of problem. I just don’t like the stuff, and cant really give you a good reason why. Snowwolf has a point about the Winchester / Ruger style triggers being less susceptible to issues, but like I said above, for me at least the majority of problems was not the actual trigger its self, and I have experienced the same issues with my Winchesters in really cold weather. I have found that Kroil or WD-40 works better for winter use on the bolt and trigger group, although they do not provide the same level of lubrication as conventional gun oil, they will displace moisture and provide enough lubrication to allow consistent operation.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  6. #6

    Default

    I use G96 on my triggers with no problems to date. The only trouble I ever had was one time I found I still had causmoline in my bolt(or something like it) that prevented firing pin movement. Replaced with G96, no problems since.

  7. #7
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    Default

    An old Kenny Jarrett trick I've used for years is to wash out the trigger group with lighter fluid. You can get that little nozzle in those tight places and squeeze. I wipe down the exterior but don't blow out the interior letting it evaporate leaving a thin lubricating film. Unless the rifle gets really funky somehow I only take it apart every other year for a good cleaning and will do the trigger again then. Only other places I lube are the rear of the locking lugs and the the cocking cam notch. Everything else stays degreased but waxed.

    til later

  8. #8
    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Thanks for your input.

  9. #9
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    Default cold weather issues

    Either carb or brake parts cleaner in a spray can will flush ot any oil from the trigger and bolt assembly. This stuff is avaliable from the auto parts stores or wally world for less than $2 a can. Make certain you get all the grease gummed up oil and crud out of the bolt body. Just don't get it on the stock finish as either will dissolve about any finish.

    For a general cold weather lube automatic transmission fluid works greatdown to -40 or below. I use Mobile 1 synethic grease with a bit of graphite added for the camming surfaces on the bolt
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