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Thread: .270 WSM enough for interior/mountain grizzly?

  1. #1
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default .270 WSM enough for interior/mountain grizzly?

    All,

    I'm considering buying a new sheep rifle for this fall. I'm looking at a Tikka T3 Lite in .270 WSM. However, I also will be looking for a grizzly on the same hunt. What do some of you experienced bear slayers think about the effectiveness of the .270 WSM on interior grizzlies? I would probably use something along the lines of a 140 grain Barnes Tipped Triple Shock bullet. Do you think this combo would suffice? If not, I could step up to the .300 WSM or .300 Win Mag but I already have a .300 Weatherby (definitely NOT a lightweight sheep rifle) and would like to diversify caliber-wise. But the ethical obligation to make a clean kill takes precedence, of course. Not to mention making sure he goes down before he can take me down What do you all think?

  2. #2
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    ohh geez...lol
    it'll work..yes
    is it the best or even good...no
    i'd go with the .300 even for the sheep, i like heavier bullets
    all that being said (not that it was much), my first brownie i shot with a .270 and 140 noslers, knocked it right down, twice. i like to shoot alot, no one shot wonders for me. when i start shooting i heat the barrell up, no point in packing out ammo too.
    it'll work and i'd feel confident using one, just be ready to shoot again and again..but thats typical with any gun.
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Why not step up to a light weight 30-06? They can shoot the heavier 30 cal bullets and still be lightend up for mountain work.

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    Default use it

    if you are confident in the gun and you're shot placement. I'll concur with BRWNBR that a larger calibre is better, but your's will work-shot placement

  5. #5

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    I would agree witht the rest. 270 WSM would probably get the job done but I personally would pick the 300 WSM or WM. The 30.06 is a good cartridge but the 300's are putting a lot more punch behind the same bullets and a lot flatter for sheep hunting.

    I never shot a Griz, but did shoot about a 300 lb Bighorn Ram with a 7mm mag (which pretty close to a 270 WSM in ballistics) using 160 gr partitions. He didn't go anywhere, but it took 4 shots to put him down. 3 were through the boiler room and the 4th in the spine. All passed clean through. And if I were to come across a 500 lb Griz, I definetly would rather be holding the 300 vs the 270.

    Good hunting

  6. #6
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    Default 270

    Its no secret around here that Im not a fan of the 270 for northern hunting, that being said yea your 270 wsm will kill a bear, so will a 22 under the right conditions! There are to many other calibers much better suited to the type of hunting you are going to do! Thats why the 30/06 is so popular, with 150 grain bullets its a great sheep gun, with 220 grainers it will work for bear. If you want a light rifle look into the short calibers like the 358 winchester or the 338 federal, if you have heard they are only short range guns, look at the ballistics! They are not. Hope you have a great hunt!

  7. #7
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Thumbs up 270 Wsm

    Yes plenty enough with a 130 TSX or 150gr Nosler Part........but I suggest a Win 70 instead.

    If you had a 26" barrel it would get 270 Weatherby performance........very good!

    Even the 270 Win is plenty for Interior hunting.
    Alaska

  8. #8

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    Accuracy is more important than power. If you're accurate then the 270 WSM should be plenty sufficient.

    Good Luck!

    -HT

  9. #9

    Default Yes............

    If you put a tough 150 grain bullet in the right spot at a reasonable distance it will work fine. Is it what most would want to use if you have to go looking for one in the "pucker brush", then I would say no.

  10. #10
    New member captainsidehill's Avatar
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    Default 270 is a great rifle

    30-06 and .270 balistics are very similar. The 30-06 may shoot a heavier bullet 180 grain plus, but in my mind and experience accuracy and shot placement is what matters. I shoot a .270 with 150 grain lead tip jacketed bullets. I have killed moose, brown bear, and black bear with no difficulties. Only once have I taken more than one shot to take down an animal. If I was hunting brown bear on Rasberry or Kodiak I would opt for a larger rifle or a partner wielding a .416 as back up.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default 270 Wsm

    I'm taking mine, deep into the heart of the Brooks Range...Hopefully not to see any griz, but if a nice one happens to show up, bring it on!!!...Hmmm, hope I make it back to tell the story....CK

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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default recoil levels

    Has anyone shot both the .270 WSM and .300 WSM in similar rifles? How does the recoil compare between the two? Is there enough difference to notice off the bench?

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    270....recoil? A 6 lb 300 WSM (as in a Kimber 8400 Montana) is not unreasonable, more or less like an '06 in a light Ti actioned rifle. In fact one of the more stout "recoilers" that I venture onto the range with is one of the original Ti Rem 700 with the soda straw barrel and max 180 loads. No doubt about hang fires there! To answer your question, yes you will easily notice the difference off the bench between a 270 WSM with a 140 gr. bullet and a 300 WSM and a 180 gr load with both being shot from the SAME (i.e. same weight, stock, etc) rifle.

  14. #14

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    BTW, the .270 Win is a necked down 30.06

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by c04hoosier View Post
    Has anyone shot both the .270 WSM and .300 WSM in similar rifles? How does the recoil compare between the two? Is there enough difference to notice off the bench?
    I'm not sure that bench recoil should dictate your choice of caliber? The primary reason to shoot off the bench is to sight in your rifle, as well as to get an idea of ballistics and distance above/below zero at different ranges. Once you have the rifle sighted in and know the zero points, practice from hunting positions (sitting, kneeling, rifle on top of pack, etc). If you can handle the recoil from those positions, you're good to go. On the bench you shouldn't be trying to handle recoil, you should be trying to get your rifle sighted in as well as possible, with whatever aids might help.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdhunter View Post
    I'm not sure that bench recoil should dictate your choice of caliber? The primary reason to shoot off the bench is to sight in your rifle, as well as to get an idea of ballistics and distance above/below zero at different ranges. Once you have the rifle sighted in and know the zero points, practice from hunting positions (sitting, kneeling, rifle on top of pack, etc). If you can handle the recoil from those positions, you're good to go. On the bench you shouldn't be trying to handle recoil, you should be trying to get your rifle sighted in as well as possible, with whatever aids might help.
    Totally agree

  17. #17
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default True

    I guess I just used recoil off the bench as a baseline because that is the position where you will feel the most recoil. I'm just trying to look at all the differences between the different calibers to help me narrow down my choice. Recoil is definitely not my deciding factor. But as I said, I'm really only looking at one type of rifle, the ammo costs roughly the same for the .270 and .300 WSM, ammo availability (or lack thereof) should be roughly the same etc. So I'm just trying to decide if the slightly higher velocity and slightly lower recoil of the .270 WSM would make it a more effective sheep round, or if I'm better off with the .300, just in case a bear wanders into my crosshairs. Are there any other factors that I'm not thinking of?

    By the way, I do handload.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by c04hoosier View Post
    I guess I just used recoil off the bench as a baseline because that is the position where you will feel the most recoil. I'm just trying to look at all the differences between the different calibers to help me narrow down my choice. Recoil is definitely not my deciding factor. But as I said, I'm really only looking at one type of rifle, the ammo costs roughly the same for the .270 and .300 WSM, ammo availability (or lack thereof) should be roughly the same etc. So I'm just trying to decide if the slightly higher velocity and slightly lower recoil of the .270 WSM would make it a more effective sheep round, or if I'm better off with the .300, just in case a bear wanders into my crosshairs. Are there any other factors that I'm not thinking of?

    By the way, I do handload.
    I think the 270 WSM would make a fine sheep rifle. But I think you'll get a little more with the 300 WSM. The 300 is faster than the 270 if you compare same bullet wieght. The 270 will push a 130 gr bullet about 3280 (fed load) and the 300 about 3500. And the 300 will push a 168 gr bullet about as fast as a 270 will push a 150 gr bullet. I'm guessing the 300 will kick a little more, but I dont think you will notice it much in the field or hunting conditions. Yep, for a bear, Iwould rather have a 300, especially if you cant get the *ideal* shot. Also, your *good* range of bullet weights (IMO) are..... 110 - 150 in the 270, and, 130 - 180 in the 300. Some shoot a 200 gr in the 300 WSM, but I would go to a larger cartridge for that size bullet.

    Good Huniting

  19. #19
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    the factor your not considering is YOU.
    once you pull the trigger the gig is up..so if you can make good shots all the time in almost every circumstance staring at a grizz from any range...you'll be fine. but if you get buck fever at all..then it won't really matter what gun you've got.
    i had a guy miss a big brown bear this spring at 40 yards...second shot didn't but thats not the point, point is, someones gotta shoot the gun to get the bullet there in the first place. as mentioned above, in the right hands any gun is lethal in the wrong hands all guns are dangerous
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