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Thread: What is in your Crash Bag?

  1. #1
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    Default What is in your Crash Bag?

    I carry a small Filson field bag with an assortment of articles that I think would be useful if I am left out on the tundra, away from civilization, for reasons beyond my control. I'm always fiddling with this kit trying to up grade it and adjusting it for different areas or climates in which I travel. I guess I'm concerned I won't have the needed items. I was just wondering what others carry in the crash kit when flying here and there in the remote areas. What are the most important things to others.

    I try to organize mine based on my "rule of threes"; water survival, first aid, shelter, water, communication, land nav, etc. plus a couple other things in the nice to have category. Just wondered what others do.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  2. #2

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    The 2 most important things in my survival equipment are my bug spray and toilet paper. I seem to always forget them when I plan a quick fishing trip and then I have to dive into the survival kit.

    I carry 2 survival kits when Im out flying. I like to wear a vest with large pockets and stuff basic survival equipment in there. I also strap a firearm to my hip. My reasoning for having this basic one is a survival kit is no good if you cant get to it. I then keep a larger kit in the baggage compartment.

  3. #3
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    Default What is in your crash bag?

    I have been flying in Alaska's most remote area called the " North Burrow ". This is primaraly the northern coast line and any way to get up there . I have been doing this for 17 years and my bag is about the same as when i made my first flight . My prioreties are as follows: 1. water 2. shelter 3. food. In four days without water we are no longer a functional human, without shelter we could be in very serious trouble. We can function without food for 30 days even though at a reduced lever . My feeling is if you are to put your bag together with this thought in mind you have gone a long way with your survival bag.
    A J Rosser

  4. #4

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    I tend to go big when it comes to survival gear, though I have plenty room to fit it in the back with no back seat in.

    Basically, I could go backpacking for almost a week with my survival kit. It is a 60 liter dry bag with backpack straps. When I have a passenger I throw another sleeping bag in the plane; the kit is already set up for two people in other ways i.e. two head nets, two headlamps etc.

    But I plan on only getting out of the plane with what is on my body. I also wear a full "mini" survival kit in my vest (summer) or flight suit (winter.)

  5. #5
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I always have this box , besides whatever item that are specific for that time or year and the area where I am going.
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    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  6. #6

    Default A starting point

    A good starting point I suppose:

    ALASKA STATUTES Sec. 02.35.110. Emergency rations and equipment.
    An airman may not make a flight inside the state with an aircraft unless emergency equipment is carried as follows:
    (1) the following minimum equipment must be carried during the summer months:
    • (A) rations for each occupant sufficient to sustain life for one week;
    • (B) one axe or hatchet;
    • (C) one first aid kit;
    • (D) an assortment of tackle such as hooks, flies, lines, and sinkers;
    • (E) one knife;
    • (F) fire starter;
    • (G) one mosquito headnet for each occupant;
    • (H) two small signaling devices such as colored smoke bombs, railroad fuses, or Very pistol shells, in sealed metal containers;
    (2) in addition to the equipment required under (1) of this subsection, the following must be carried as minimum equipment from October 15 to April 1 of each year:
    • (A) one pair of snowshoes;
    • (B) one sleeping bag;
    • (C) one wool blanket or equivalent for each occupant over four.
    (b) However, operators of multi-engine aircraft licensed to carry more than 15 passengers need carry only the food, mosquito nets, and signalling equipment at all times other than the period from October 15 to April 1 of each year, when two sleeping bags, and one blanket for every two passengers shall also be carried.
    All of the above requirements as to emergency rations and equipment are considered to be minimum requirements which are to remain in full force and effect, except as further safety measures may be from time to time imposed by the department.

  7. #7
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Unless of course you catch a ride on many of our 135 carriers flying C-206s. They usually have nothing.. Pounds are money...
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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