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Thread: Revolver Tune-Up ??

  1. #1
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    Default Revolver Tune-Up ??

    One time a feller tolt meÖ.

    He sent his S&W revolver back to S&W for a tune up, or something like that. He had put boo-coo rounds through it and wanted it tightened, or something like that.

    Is this something that is commonly done?
    How do you go about it?
    Should an older, much fired, revolver be taken to a Gunsmith instead?

    Iím not talking about a revolver with a problem, but maybe one that doesnít lock up as good as a new one. Something well used, and perhaps with worn parts.

    Iím also wondering how I would determine the need for such action, and the cost effectiveness etc.

    Specifically, I bought an Older Light-weight S&W Mdl with a 3Ē barrel at a Gun Show some time ago. Iíve had no problems with it whatsoever, and it shoots well. I might shoot it more, but it seems to be well used/shot already.

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
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  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    One of the checks is to feel for any play in the cylinder with it locked up and hammer cocked. If you can 'wiggle' the cylinder, then it is time for a tune up. Most gunsmiths can do this work. While most guns will continue to function just fine with a little wear, at some point it will become a safety issue as the cylinder gets to the point of being out of time with the barrel.
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  3. #3

    Default tune up

    I don't know about S&W but I sent my Ruger Redhawk back for that very reason and they gave it a goin' over, replaced some parts, gave it a clean bill of health and sent it back to me. My only expense was getting it to them. NOW that's service.
    Sarge
    RIDE TALL, SHOOT STRAIGHT AND ALWAYS TELL THE TRUTH

  4. #4

    Default a little wiggle okay

    Having a little wiggle in a S&W with the action cocked is okay, a lot isn't. If you can't determine how much is too much, take it to a gunsmith. But, if your gun is shooting well and not "spitting" lead from between the cylinder and barrel when fired, it's probably fine. To find out, go to the range and place a piece of cardboard on either side of the range bench. Fire a cylinder or two of rounds downrange and see it anything has hit and punctured the cardboard. This will tell you if cylinder timing is acceptable. Also, with the gun unloaded, look at the front of the crane and see if there is much movement in it when you wiggle the cylinder side to side. If yours is the lightweight model, make sure it is rated for +P loads or not. I have a Ruger
    Security Six, about 30 years old. It has some "wiggle" in the cylinder and there is some play between the crane and frame, but it doesn't shave lead and shoots great. Go figure.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Thanks very much to ALL responders.

    Mauserboy:
    I've no indication of lead shaving, but I will do your test, next opportunity.

    I can hold it inside a little box while shooting it at the range.

    I would say, its like the Security Six you discribe.

    It's an Airweight Mdl 37 S&W, and probably not as strong as your Ruger.

    I don't shoot Plus P ammo, in practice, but I do CC it with 110 grain Win. HPs, and have fired a few of them and other Plus P loads in it.

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Something that hasnt been mentioned yet, but should, is, cock the revolver v-e-r-y slowly, then see if the cylinder will turn any further in the direction that it does when cocking, if you can hear the locking bolt click into place at that point, the timing is out, and should have a new hand fitted. Often it will only be one or two chambers that don't index all the way in. If it passes this test, I will also put a very slight drag on the cylinder while cocking to see if it positively indexes all the way into place. If it passes this test, it should work fine even if very dirty or very cold. If it doesn't, it's generally ok, but close to needing a hand fitted.


    Some people claim that the rotational momentem will carry the cylinder into place in "actual use", but I don't buy that, if it doesnt function properly, I dont want to take chances it will work when I really need it. It should positively rotate and lock into place even with some resistance.


    Another thing to look at with older Smiths that have the hammer mounted firing pin, you can cock the hammer, and look around both sides of the hammer through the firing pin hole in the frame and see if the chamber throats line up perfectly and evenly (from side to side)with the barrel. Check all six. Have a decent light coming in the barrel, just pointed towards a light source or window is plenty. Keep in mind that you are often looking at a land on one side and a groove on the other, giving the apearance of being uneven, so look very carefully before deciding it isn't quite right.

    You can do a similar thing with frame mounted firing pins by cocking, then lowering the hammer, leaving the trigger back and firing pin protruding through the frame, then shine a light against the firing pin from the side to bounce down the barrel and you can look into the muzzle and see the alignment of the individual chambers with the barrel. Check all six. It seems to take about 3 hands until you get it figured out.

  7. #7
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    I forget which revolver it was, but there was one that I knew of that would not rotate the cylinder into place when cocked very slowly, but at anything faster than a creep, then it would. For that gun, this WAS normal and the factory stated so. But I can't remember which one it was ...it's been awhile so it's probably not in production now anyway.

    Brian

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